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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

directed by Ridley Scott
USA 1982

One of the most visually influential science fiction films ever made, Blade Runner has a history as labyrinthine as any of its futuristic film noir sets. A fascinatingly contemplative detective story about a world-weary android-killer and his renegade prey, it has attracted a sizeable cult audience and retains a unique place in cinema.


Los Angeles, year 2019. Cynical ex-cop Deckard (Harrison Ford) is a retired assassin of rogue androids (called "replicants"). His former boss, Bryant (M. Emmet Walsh), presses him into service: he is to kill a group of physically superior replicants that are on the loose after escaping from an "off-world" colony. Deckard visits the Tyrell Corporation, where he encounters mogul Eldon Tyrell (Joseph Turkel) and his assistant, Rachael (Sean Young). Tyrell informs Deckard that Rachael is a new breed of replicant--implanted with memories, she believes herself to be human. Bent on speaking to Tyrell in order to find out what their "termination dates" are, two of the replicants--Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) and Pris (Daryl Hannah)--insinuate themselves into the home of geneticist J.F. Sebastian (William Sanderson), who created the replicant design for Tyrell. In the meantime, two more of the replicants have been disposed of and Deckard has become romantically obsessed with Rachael.

A critical and commercial flop in its initial, 116-minute domestic release, Blade Runner has been shown in numerous versions in the years since. Most notable are the original theatrical cut, an "unrated version" (featuring additional violent footage) prepared for home-video release, and director Ridley Scott's official "director's cut," which offered some key variations on the original theatrical version of the film. Whatever the version, and for all its stylistic achievements and excesses, this "future noir" contains performances as stunning as its look: Ford's pained, taciturn Deckard; Hauer's doomed, dangerous, tragic Batty; Sanderson's naive yet knowing Sebastian; and Young's icily cool yet terrified Rachael. The moody musical score evokes classic noir without sinking into caricature, and the pre-computer-animation special effects seem more lifelike than their sometimes sterile-looking counterparts in films made a decade later.

Excerpt from TV Guide located HERE

 

Posters

Theatrical Release: June 25th, 1982

Reviews         More Reviews        DVD Reviews

Comparison: 

Warner - Region 1 - NTSC vs. Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC vs. Warner (2-disc - FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC vs. Warner (5-disc Complete CE) - Region FREE - Blu-ray

 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC LEFT

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray RIGHT

 

DVD Box Cover

Distribution

Warner

Region 1 - NTSC

Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition)

Region 1 - NTSC

Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT)

Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC

Warner (5-disc Complete CE)

Region FREE - Blu-ray

Making sense of the  Blade Runner editions:

Blade Runner - The Final Cut (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Ridley Scott, 1982) is the barest SD edition (Compared on this page)

Blade Runner (Four-Disc Collector's Edition) (Ridley Scott, 1982) is the next SD version up with two more discs - DISC 3: 1982 THEATRICAL VERSION, 1982 INTERNATIONAL VERSION, 1992 DIRECTOR'S CUT and Disc Four: BONUS DISC - "Enhancement Archive":

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Ultimate Collector's Edition)* (Ridley Scott, 1982) Warner *

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Ultimate Collector's Edition)* [Blu-ray] (Ridley Scott, 1982) Warner *

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Complete) [Blu-ray] (Ridley Scott, 1982) is in hi-def but without the accoutrements listed below

* The Ultimate Collector's Edition) was packaged in a limited edition, numbered "Deckard" briefcase and features rare and collectable memorabilia such as a Spinner car replica, Unicorn figurine, Illustration and Photo cards, and a lenticular Motion Film Clip in lucite. It is now out-of-print.

Runtime 1:56:32 1:56:24 1:57:16 1:57:36.841

Video

2.20:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 4.77 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.1 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 7.7 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 23,317,377,296 bytes

Feature: 23,156,164,608 bytes

Video Bitrate: 16.87 Mbps

Codec: VC-1 Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate : Warner

Bitrate: Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition)

Bitrate: Warner (2-disc Final Cut)

Bitrate: Warner Blu-ray

Audio English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo) English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono) English (Dolby Digital 5.1), DUB: French (Dolby Digital 5.1) Dolby TrueHD Audio English 3766 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3766 kbps / 24-bit (AC3 Embedded: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps / DN -4dB)
Dolby Digital Audio English 640 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps / DN -4dB
Dolby Digital Audio French 640 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps / DN -4dB
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / DN -4dB
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / DN -4dB
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / DN -4dB
Subtitles English, Spanish, French, None English, Spanish, French, None English, Spanish, French, None English, Chinese , French, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Spanish, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.20:1

Edition Details:
• Cast bios (text screens)

Pan and Scan 1.33 version on opposite side

DVD Release Date: March 26th, 1997
Snapper case

Chapters 34

Release Information:
Studio: Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition)
 

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.35:1

Edition Details:
• none

 

DVD Release Date: September 4th, 2006
Keep Case

Chapters 36

Release Information:
Studio: Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT)
 

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.35:1

Edition Details:
• Ridley Scott intro (:36)

• Commentary by Ridley Scott
• Commentary by executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-screenwriter David Peoples; producer Michael Deely and production executive Katherine Haber
• Commentary by visual futurist Syd Mead; production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryer

Disc 2

• DOCUMENTARY: DANGEROUS DAYS - MAKING BLADE RUNNER (3:33:51)
 

DVD Release Date: December 18th, 2007
Keep Case inside cardboard sleeve

Chapters 36

Release Information:
Studio: Warner (5-disc Complete)
 

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.35:1

Edition Details:
• Supplements: Disc One (in HIGH DEFINITION!)
RIDLEY SCOTT'S ALL-NEW "FINAL CUT" VERSION OF THE FILM
Restored and remastered with added & extended scenes, added lines, new and cleaner special effects and all new 5.1 Dolby Digital Audio. Also includes:

Commentary by Ridley Scott
Commentary by executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-screenwriter David Peoples; producer Michael Deely and production executive Katherine Haber
Commentary by visual futurist Syd Mead; production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryer

Disc Two
DOCUMENTARY DANGEROUS DAYS: MAKING BLADE RUNNER
A feature-length authoritative documentary revealing all the elements that shaped this hugely influential cinema landmark. Cast, crew, critics and colleagues give a behind-the-scenes, in-depth look at the film -- from its literary roots and inception through casting, production, visuals and special effects to its controversial legacy and place in Hollywood history.

Disc Three (in HIGH DEFINITION!)
1982 THEATRICAL VERSION
This is the version that introduced U.S. movie-going audiences to a revolutionary film with a new and excitingly provocative vision of the near-future. It contains Deckard/Harrison Ford's character narration and has Deckard and Rachel's (Sean Young) "happy ending" escape scene.
1982 INTERNATIONAL VERSION
Also used on U.S. home video, laserdisc and cable releases up to 1992. This version is not rated, and contains some extended action scenes in contrast to the Theatrical Version.
1992 DIRECTOR'S CUT
The Director's Cut omits Deckard's voiceover narration and removes the "happy ending" finale. It adds the famously-controversial "unicorn" sequence, a vision that Deckard has which suggests that he, too, may be a replicant.

Disc Four
BONUS DISC - "Enhancement Archive": 90 minutes of deleted footage and rare or never-before-seen items in featurettes and galleries that cover the film's amazing history, production teams, special effects, impact on society, promotional trailers, TV spots, and much more.

Featurette "The Electric Dreamer: Remembering Philip K. Dick"
Featurette "Sacrificial Sheep: The Novel vs. The Film"
Philip K. Dick: The Blade Runner Interviews (audio)
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep Cover Gallery (images)
The Art of Blade Runner (image galleries)
Featurette "Signs of the Times: Graphic Design"
Featurette "Fashion Forward: Wardrobe & Styling"
Screen Tests: Rachel & Pris
Featurette "The Light That Burns: Remembering Jordan Cronenweth"
Unit photography gallery
Deleted and alternate scenes
1982 promotional featurettes
Trailers and TV spots
Featurette "Promoting Dystopia: Rendering the Poster Art"
Marketing and merchandise gallery (images)
Featurette "Deck-A-Rep: The True Nature of Rick Deckard"
Featurette "--Nexus Generation: Fans & Filmmakers"

Disc Five (in HIGH DEFINITION!)
WORKPRINT VERSION
This rare version of the film is considered by some to be the most radically different of all the Blade Runner cuts. It includes an altered opening scene, no Deckard narration until the final scenes, no "unicorn" sequence, no Deckard/Rachel "happy ending," altered lines between Batty (Rutger Hauer) and his creator Tyrell (Joe Turkell), alternate music and much more. It has a Scott intro and a full commentary.

 

Blu-ray Release Date: December 18th, 2007

Chapters 36

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

 

Firstly, the Ultimate briefcase Blu-ray version is out-of-print but the 5-discs as in the Complete package and are the exact same transfers and extras (minus the lenticular motion film clip from the original feature, miniature origami unicorn figurine, miniature replica spinner car, and collector's photographs, as well as a signed personal letter from Sir Ridley Scott.)

 

We have just repeated our comments from the Complete Blu-ray review HERE - THE FINAL CUT is an, occasionally, impressive upgrade over DVD. While the 4K resolution is, at times, initially awesome with all the futuristic cityscapes - the transfer could have been improved upon as it is limited by being single-layered with a very modest bitrate. The expansively lit city atmospheres are, no doubt, very pleasing. Colors are more vivid. It still exports the bluish/green hue we can see in the 4-discFINAL CUT DVD version. The 'cooler' look is not as prevalent in my opinion. As previously noted with hi-def - colors are bright and darker scenes can be pitch with subtle highlights accentuating the contrast. There is some minimal noise but the visuals are overwhelming enough that you don't notice much.

For more on the other 4-discs in the Complete package - see our review HERE.

Sporting Dolby TrueHD mix, the lossless surround is a big improvement over the SD 5.1. The film's track with Vangelis score and subtle background interferences are where separations sound more defined. This is the exact type of film that benefits most from an enhanced audio track. It seems flawless - solid range and depth. Dialogue on the FINAL CUT is supported by English SDH, French, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and Spanish subtitles. On the 'Archival' and 'Workprint' we have English SDH, French or Spanish options. My Momitsu has identified it as being a region FREE disc playable on Blu-ray machines worldwide.

Extras - see the extensive Complete edition full list above. The FINAL CUT on Blu-ray disc one has the same three optional commentaries. Scott's, executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-screenwriter David Peoples; producer Michael Deely and production executive Katherine Haber and finally one by visual futurist Syd Mead; production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryerand). I found all 3 enjoyable but would also have preferred an academic-type look at the film (perhaps Paul Sammon alone). The closest that it came to was the writer's input (Fancher and Peoples) on commentary 2. The third was unique in that it had multiple inputs - which is always refreshing to hear different viewpoints and anecdotal episodes. I think these 'discussions' will be good for those very keen on the film and even those with just a passing interest after they have seen the FINAL CUT.

I wasn't a fan of the Ultimate with the lucite case (incidentally with a 'Made in China' sticker). In the Complete Collector's Edition (exact same transfer but without the unnecessary accoutrements) - fans don't have much to think about here. It is the best available for the film(s) and I doubt another transfer is coming anytime soon. This is still an experience that extensively benefits from the high-definition video transfer and lossless audio. 

 - Gary Tooze

ON THE DVDs: In regards to content I refer you to Amazon that states: "In celebration of Blade Runner's 25th anniversary, director Ridley Scott has gone back into post production to create the long-awaited definitive new version. Blade Runner: The Final Cut, spectacularly restored and remastered from original elements and scanned at 4K resolution, will contain never-before-seen added/extended scenes, added lines, new and improved special effects, director and filmmaker commentary, an all-new 5.1 Dolby® Digital audio track and more. Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Edward James Olmos, Joanna Cassidy, Sean Young, and Daryl Hannah are among some 80 stars, filmmakers and others who participate in the extensive bonus features. Among the bonus material highlights is Dangerous Days, a brand new, three-and-a-half-hour documentary by award-winning DVD producer Charles de Lauzirika, with an extensive look into every aspect of the film: its literary genesis, its challenging production and its controversial legacy. The definitive documentary to accompany the definitive film version."

In regards to the image differences - the new FINAL CUT is definitely cooler with some heavier blue-ish/green shading. It is a bit darker - compression is excellent (note: bumped bitrate) and there are less artifacts. I expect the high-def versions will look even superior but this looks exceptionally good for SD. Our new format reviews will be forthcoming. Along with the different, and better image, in my opinion, there are some subtle differences - the opening rolling text screen font is larger (and clearer). The optional subtitle font is smaller, and I found, easier to read with a more prominent black border and less 'jaggies'.

I, personally, found the new look a little more visually arresting. It has a new atmospheric effect - I found it a deeper one.

Audio (as advertised) has a new 5.1 track that sounds very good at times. It has some decent separation and the film really benefits from the inclusion of this new track. I thought it sounded wonderfully buoyant and subtle. Big improvement to my crusty old ears.

Disc one has three optional commentaries (for those that can't get enough!). I've finished all three (Scott's, executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-screenwriter David Peoples; producer Michael Deely and production executive Katherine Haber and finally one by visual futurist Syd Mead; production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryerand). I found them enjoyable but would also have preferred an academic-type look at the film (perhaps Paul Sammon alone). The closest that it came to was the writer's input (Fancher and Peoples) on commentary 2. The third was unique in that it had multiple inputs - which is always refreshing to hear different viewpoints and anecdotal episodes. I think these 'discussions' will be good for those very keen on the film and even those with just a passing interest after they have seen the FINAL CUT. I enjoy Blade Runner but know there are others out there that are quite fanatical about the film. I'm not in their league. The many versions (2-disc, 4-disc, 5-disc) cater to those of varying appeal for Blade Runner.

As one can judge my the times - the FINAL CUT is not especially longer (45 seconds) but has some new digital fixes and improvements in continuity errors. It's hard to critique this version as it has the full support of the director Scott.

So all in all, Disc One of this 2-disc FINAL CUT has:
RIDLEY SCOTT'S ALL-NEW "FINAL CUT" VERSION OF THE FILM
Restored and remastered with added & extended scenes, added lines, new and cleaner special effects and all new 5.1 Dolby Digital Audio. Also includes:
Commentary by Ridley Scott
Commentary by executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher and co-screenwriter David Peoples; producer Michael Deely and production executive Katherine Haber
Commentary by visual futurist Syd Mead; production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and David Dryer

Disc Two
3.5 hour Documentary: DANGEROUS DAYS - MAKING BLADE RUNNER is a feature-length authoritative documentary revealing all the elements that shaped this hugely influential cinema landmark. Cast, crew, critics and colleagues give a behind-the-scenes, in-depth look at the film -- from its literary roots and inception through casting, production, visuals and special effects to its controversial legacy and place in Hollywood history.

it is divided into 8 self-explanatory sections: Incept Date - 1980: Screenwriting and Dealmaking, Blush Response: Assembling the Cast, A Good Star: Designing the Future, Eye of the Storm: Production Begins, Living in Fear: Tension on the Set, Beyond the Window: Visual Effects, In Need of Magic: Post production Problems and To Hades and Back: Release and Resurrection. NOTE: This documentary is interlaced.

Wow. Okay I'm going to finish the third commentary (report back) and then watch the 4-disc edition next (stay tuned) and soon after we hope to have high-definition reviews up. I can't imagine fans not loving this and swallowing it up whole. The image, audio and content changes are improvements and the supplements (commentary and bonus documentary seem more than  enough to sate even the staunchest of Blade Runner devotees. For $14 - it's the deal of the year.    

****

ON THE DIRECTOR'S CUT (September 2006)

NOTE: The restored "director's cut" debuted September 4th, 2006 and will remain on sale for only four months, after which time it will be placed on moratorium. Blade Runner: Final Cut will arrive in 2007 for a limited 25th-anniversary theatrical run, followed by a special-edition DVD with the three previous versions offered as alternate viewing. Besides the original theatrical version and director's cut, the expanded international theatrical cut will be included. The set will also contain additional bonus materials.

The new 'remastered limited edition' release is quite a pleasant surprise, although not the 'longer original theatrical version' that many fans crave - it is still the 'Director's Cut' at 116 minutes. The original Warner DVD was transferred in a 2.20:1 ratio from the 70 mm blowup prints where the new edition is 2.35:1 exposing more information in the frame on all 4 sides.

There were many issue in the original DVD that was produced way back in 1997. It had a significant black border circumventing the frame severely limiting the horizontal resolution. It had many artifacts, was single-layered, skin tones appeared very red and blotchy, colors bleed and were washed-out, and the disc had no viable extra features. The black-boosting done on the 97 release made a dark film even darker - obscuring objects in the background.

Warner have corrected many of these limitations - the DVD is now on a dual-layered disc, significantly brighter, tighter to the frame (although there is s much slimer border than on the original), artifacts are virtually gone and colors seem to be closer to the original state than ever before. Unfortunately, there are still no supplements. Subtitles are also visually improved and audio offers a 2.0 channel French DUB option absent in the 97' issue. Both remain anamorphic and progressive but the new remastered edition is vastly superior. Fans will be very happy, but not ecstatic - they can continue to patiently wait for the original theatrical length, a Scott commentary and more... Regardless this is the best it has looked on digital so far.    

 - Gary Tooze

 



DVD Menus

Warner (original release) - Region 1 - NTSC 

 

   

Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC LEFT vs. Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC  RIGHT)

 
 
 

 

Warner - FINAL CUT - Disc 2

 

 

Blu-ray Menus (FINAL CUT)

 


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Screen Captures

 

 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM


Subtitle Sample: Not exact frame

 

 


 

 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Warner - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition) - Region 1 - NTSC SECOND

3) Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT) - Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC THIRD

4) Warner (5-disc Complete Collector's Edition) - Region FREE - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

More Blu-ray Captures


 

Report Card:

 

Image:

Blu-ray

Sound:

Blu-ray

Extras: Blu-ray

 
DVD Box Cover

Distribution

Warner

Region 1 - NTSC

Warner (Remastered - Limited Edition)

Region 1 - NTSC

Warner (2-disc FINAL CUT)

Region 1,2,3,4 - NTSC

Warner (5-disc Complete CE)

Region FREE - Blu-ray

Making sense of the  Blade Runner editions:

Blade Runner - The Final Cut (Two-Disc Special Edition) (Ridley Scott, 1982) is the barest SD edition (Compared on this page)

Blade Runner (Four-Disc Collector's Edition) (Ridley Scott, 1982) is the next SD version up with two more discs - DISC 3: 1982 THEATRICAL VERSION, 1982 INTERNATIONAL VERSION, 1992 DIRECTOR'S CUT and Disc Four: BONUS DISC - "Enhancement Archive":

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Ultimate Collector's Edition)* (Ridley Scott, 1982) Warner *

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Ultimate Collector's Edition)* [Blu-ray] (Ridley Scott, 1982) Warner *

Blade Runner (Five-Disc Complete) [Blu-ray] (Ridley Scott, 1982) is in hi-def but without the accoutrements listed below

* The Ultimate Collector's Edition) was packaged in a limited edition, numbered "Deckard" briefcase and features rare and collectable memorabilia such as a Spinner car replica, Unicorn figurine, Illustration and Photo cards, and a lenticular Motion Film Clip in lucite. It is now out-of-print.




 

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