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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "Seven Samurai" or "Shichinin no samurai")

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/kurosawa.htm
Japan 1954

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"Farmers are stingy, foxy, blubbering, mean, stupid and murderous! God damn! That's what they are! But then, who made them such beasts? You did! You samurai did it! You burn their villages! Destroy their farms! Steal their food! Force them to labor! Take their women! And kill them if they resist! So what should farmers do?"

— Kikuchiyo, Seven Samurai

****

A desperate village hires seven samurai to protect it from marauders in this crown jewel of Japanese cinema. No other film so seamlessly weaves philosophy and entertainment, delicate human emotions and relentless action. Featuring Japan’s legendary star, the great Toshiro Mifune, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai is an inspired epic a triumph of art, and an unforgettable three-hour ride.

****

One of the most beloved movie epics of all time, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai (Shichinin no samurai) tells the story of a sixteenth-century village whose desperate inhabitants hire the eponymous warriors to protect them from invading bandits. This three-hour ride—featuring legendary actors Toshiro Mifune and Takashi Shimura—seamlessly weaves philosophy and entertainment, delicate human emotions and relentless action into a rich, evocative, and unforgettable tale of courage and hope.

Posters

Theatrical Release: April 26th, 1954 - Japan

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Criterion - REISSUE Package (CLICK to enlarge)

CineKorea Package (CLICK to enlarge)

Comparison:

Criterion (REISSUE) - Region 1- NTSC vs. CineKorea co. (2-disc) - Region 0 - NTSC vs. Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL vs. AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL vs. Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Big thanks to and Mark Wilson, Guillaume and Geert Jan Alsem for many of the Screen Caps!

(Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC LEFT vs. CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC MIDDLE vs. Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - RIGHT)

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Distribution

Criterion Collection REISSUE (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

CineKorea Co.

Region 0 - NTSC

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

(click titles for DVDBeaver reviews)

Criterion (without any extras) also available in The Essential Art House - 50 Years of Janus Films - a 50-disc celebration of international films collected under the auspices of the groundbreaking theatrical distributor. It contains Alexander Nevsky (1938), Ashes And Diamonds (1958), L'avventura (1960), Ballad Of A Soldier (1959), Beauty And The Beast (1946), Black Orpheus (1959), Brief Encounter (1945), The Fallen Idol (1948), Fires On The Plain (1959), Fists In The Pocket (1965), Floating Weeds (1959), Forbidden Games (1952), The 400 Blows (1959), Grand Illusion (1937), Häxan (1922), Ikiru (1952), The Importance Of Being Earnest (1952), Ivan The Terrible, Part II (1958), Le Jour Se Lève (1939), Jules And Jim (1962), Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949), Knife In The Water (1962), The Lady Vanishes (1938), The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp (1943), Loves Of A Blonde (1965), M (1931), M. Hulot's Holiday (1953), Miss Julie (1951), Pandora's Box (1929), Pépé Le Moko (1937), Il Posto (1961), Pygmalion (1938), Rashomon (1950), Richard III (1955), The Rules Of The Game (1939), Seven Samurai (1954), The Seventh Seal (1957), The Spirit Of The Beehive (1973), La Strada (1954), Summertime (1955), The Third Man (1949), The 39 Steps (1935), Ugetsu (1953), Umberto D. (1952), The Virgin Spring (1960), Viridiana (1961), The Wages Of Fear (1953), The White Sheik (1952), Wild Strawberries (1957), Three Documentaries By Saul J. Turell plus the hardcover, full color 240-page book.

 

 (BFI - Region 2 - PAL - LEFT vs. AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - MIDDLE  vs. Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - RIGHT)

 

 

 

BFI
Region 2 - PAL
AV Channel
Region 4 - PAL

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

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Distribution

Criterion Collection - REISSUE (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

CineKorea Co.

Region 0 - NTSC

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

BFI
Region 2 - PAL

AV Channel
Region 4 - PAL

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Runtime 1:51:48 + 1:34:54 = 3:26:42 1:51:32 + 1:34:54 - 3:26:26 3:26:16 3:09:11 (4% PAL speedup) 3:26:37 3:27:04.495
Video 1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 8.10 + 7.48 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s
1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.61 + 6.66 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.80 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.88 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.96 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 49,420,797,314 bytes

Feature: 48,881,676,288 bytes

Video Bitrate: 25.49 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Criterion (REISSUE)

(Disc 1 + 2)

Bitrate:

 

CineKorea

(Disc 1 + 2)

 

  

Bitrate:

 

Criterion (original)

Bitrate:

 

BFI

Bitrate:

 

AV Channel

Bitrate:

 

Criterion Blu-ray

Audio Japanese (Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono), Japanese (Dolby Digital 4.0 Stereo) Japanese (Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono), Japanese (Dolby Digital 5.1) Japanese (Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono)

Japanese (Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono)

Japanese (Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono), Japanese (Dolby Digital 5.1)

LPCM Audio Japanese 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit
LPCM Audio Japanese 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
Subtitles English, None English, Korean and none English and none English (burned in) English and none English and none
Features Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Two audio commentaries: one by film scholars David Desser, Joan Mellen, Stephen Prince, Tony Rayns, and Donald Richie; the other by Japanese-film expert Michael Jeck
• A 50-minute documentary on the making of Seven Samurai, part of the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create
• My Life in Cinema, a two-hour video conversation between Akira Kurosawa and Nagisa Oshima produced by the Directors Guild of Japan (1:55:51)
• Seven Samurai: Origins and Influences, a new documentary looking at the samurai traditions and films that impacted Kurosawa's masterpiece (55:06)
• Theatrical trailers and teaser
• Gallery of rare posters and behind-the scenes and production stills
• Liner notes booklet featuring essays by Peter Cowie, Philip Kemp, Peggy Chiao, Alain Silver, Kenneth Turan, Stuart Galbraith, Arthur Penn, and Sidney Lumet and an interview with Toshiro Mifune

DVD Release Date: September 5th, 2006
Four-tiered digipak inside cardboard box with book

Chapters 29

Release Information:
C
ineKorea Co.

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Commentary by Japanese film expert Michael Jeck (same as Criterion)
• Original U.S. Theatrical Trailer
• 56-page liner notes booklet with color posters, photos (in Korean)
• 20' X 15 color poster

• Trailers

• Making of the Seven Samurai (Japanese audio, Korean subtitles) (49:05)

DVD Release Date: April 8th, 2005

Double slim keep case inside VHS sized box

Chapters 30 + 21 = 51

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Commentary by Japanese film expert Michael Jeck
• Original U.S. Theatrical Trailer
• Two page liner notes by David Ehrenstein
• Restoration demonstration (1st out of print version only)

DVD Release Date: August 5th, 1998
Keep Case

Chapters 30

Release Information:
Studio: BFI

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Video essay by film historian Philip Kemp
• Akira Kurosawa biography
• Toshiro Mifune biography
• Leaflet with film notes and director's biography
 

DVD Release Date: November 22, 1999
Keep Case

Chapters 28

Release Information:
Studio: AV Channel

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Trailer: Kurosawa, Yojimbo
• Eastern Eye Montage
• Main Menu Audio
• Theatrical Trailer
• Booklet

 

DVD Release Date: February 11th, 2004
Keep Case

Chapters 12

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

 

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 49,420,797,314 bytes

Feature: 48,881,676,288 bytes

Video Bitrate: 25.49 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:
• Two audio commentaries, one featuring film scholars David Desser, Joan Mellen, Stephen Prince, Tony Rayns, and Donald Richie, and the other Japanese film expert Michael Jeck
• Fifty-minute documentary on the making of Seven Samurai, created as part of the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create (49:11 in HD!)
• My Life in Cinema, a two-hour video conversation from 1993 between directors Akira Kurosawa and Nagisa Oshima
(1:56:00 in HD!)
• Seven Samurai: Origins and Influences, a documentary looking at the samurai traditions and films that helped shape Kurosawa’s masterpiece (55:12 in HD!)
•Gallery of rare posters, behind-the scenes photos, and production stills

3 Trailers and 1 Teaser
• 40-page liner notes booklet featuring essays by Kenneth Turan, Peter Cowie, Philip Kemp, Peggy Chiao, Alain Silver, Stuart Galbraith, Arthur Penn, and Sidney Lumet and an interview with Toshiro Mifune from 1993

Blu-ray Release Date: October 19th, 2010
Custom Blu-ray Case

Chapters 29


Recommended Reading for Kurosawa Fans (CLICK COVERS or TITLES for more information)

Check out more in "The Library"


Comments: Blu-ray

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Criterion Region 'A' - Blu-ray - September 2010: Spine # 2 but pretty much considered Criterion's flagship title. We should state that , yes, there is another Region 'A' Seven Samurai Blu-ray - by Toho in Japan - with no English subtitles - but it was a disaster with excessive DNR and contrast boosting (we compared a few captures HERE in the AK100 Box).

For many cinephiles this is the film they wanted in 1080P - and they wanted Criterion to release it. Wishes do come true. For a reviewer it doesn't get much more... relevant.

So, how does it look? - smoother, less damage (speckles, scratches) than ever... and grain. Brighter whites, richer blacks... This is, BY FAR, the best digital presentation going way back to LaserDisc and through many incarnations including Criterions initial foray on SD-DVD way back in 1998 (even before spine #1!), and the last pictureboxed DVD in 2006. Scratches below the surface still exist but in-motion this is a wonderful treat in 1080P. There are even instances of depth. It needs to be seen - but this is, at times, mesmerizing what Criterion have done in terms of restoration and transfer competency. The grain can be a shade clunky at times but the 3.5 hour feature takes up almost 49 Gig of the, maximum, 50 available! Compression couldn't be any better via this format - probably detail as well. It's from the same fallible source but it's simply amazing what Criterion have transformed it into. This is a massive improvement.

We lose the 4.0 track but do get two lossless options (mono and 2.0 channel stereo linear PCMs - NOT 'DTS-Master' as advertised - see paragraph below*) plus the two commentaries. I have now made extensive comparisons - I tried the 2.0 channel first time - sampling a the mono in a subsequent viewing. We should note that the cleaner mono is, definitely, the preferred track of the two. It seems the stereo is really here as a 'supplement' and not as restored as the mono - less focused and solid. The Blu-ray contains, excellent, optional English subtitles and my Momitsu confirms that the disc is region 'A'-locked.

*Regarding the track discrepancy - Criterion have replied to me: "The stereo surround track on our disc is indeed encoded as 2 channel linear PCM and should be DTS HD-Master Audio 2.0." That said, "The viewer's experience is essentially the same here. Both lossless codecs result in 2 channel linear PCMs being output to the receiver, the only difference being that the lossy DTS core of the DTS HD-MA stream (which viewers with older, non HDMI 1.3 equipped receivers would hear) carries a Dolby Pro Logic flag that triggers surround decoding of the stereo track by their receivers. Anyone listening to a lossless stereo surround (aka LT/RT, Dolby Pro Logic) track needs to manually engage Pro Logic decoding as PCMs can't carry that flag."

Supplements speak for themselves with two audio commentaries, one featuring David Desser, Joan Mellen, Stephen Prince, Tony Rayns, and Donald Richie (described as a 'scholar's roundtable commentary'), and the other Japanese film expert Michael Jeck. Both were found on the last Criterion DVD. Aside from the feature film - this is all that is on the first dual-layered Blu-ray disc (aside from the timeline feature). There is a second Blu-ray - is stacked with almost 4 hours of material including a fifty-minute documentary on the making of Seven Samurai, created as part of the Toho Masterworks series Akira Kurosawa: It Is Wonderful to Create, My Life in Cinema, a two-hour video conversation from 1993 between directors Akira Kurosawa and Nagisa Oshima, Seven Samurai: Origins and Influences, a 55-minute documentary looking at the samurai traditions and films that helped shape Kurosawa’s masterpiece. We also get 3 theatrical trailers and one teaser - like all the video extras these are in HD. There is a gallery of rare posters, behind-the scenes photos, and production stills plus 3 trailers and 1 teaser. Included is a 40-page liner notes booklet featuring essays by Kenneth Turan, Peter Cowie, Philip Kemp, Peggy Chiao, Alain Silver, Stuart Galbraith, Arthur Penn, and Sidney Lumet and an interview with Toshiro Mifune from 1993.

It's an incredibly impressive package - see images below - with a two-tiered digi-pack and slipcase with space for the hefty liner notes booklet - surely getting a slew of votes at our year end poll. Criterion have come through for their fans with their usual level of unrivaled expertise in digital-film production supporting their ravenous world-cinema customer base. STRONGLY recommended!

NOTE: BFI are scheduled to release their region 'B' Blu-ray in 2011!

- Gary W. Tooze

Comments: Criterions

ADDITION: Criterion - REISSUE - (Aug -06) : Even though spine #2, Seven Samurai may very well have been Criterion's very first DVD release (spine #1, Renoirs La Grande Illusion, was delayed). It was way back in August 1998. It had the 3.5 hour film (including intermission) and Michael Jeck commentary crammed into one disc. It showed flickering contrast, deterioration marks and obvious edge enhancement from the crude digital manipulation attempts to visually rectify them. Over the years other editions have surfaced with improvements in removing some of the wear-and-tear shown on the original Criterion, but barring a restoration, the transfers always showed some weaknesses. The latest, CineKorea, appears to have been taken from a French or Toho edition with yellow English and Korean subtitles added. Frankly, it was still the best option for English-locked audiences.... up until now of course.

NOTE: A 'B' edition of the original Criterion came out with the restoration demonstration removed (for legal purposes I believe).

Rumored for a while, in 2006 Criterion officially announced that they would REISSUE one of their most popular digital versatile discs with improvements in the re-mastering process. Knowing Criterion's commitment and their diligent work ethic we expected a reparatory improvement, but what they produced has far outweighed any expectations fans could have hoped for. Criterion has spread the film over two discs with 2 optional commentaries. They have added a third disc containing further feature documentaries and included in the package a beautiful 56-page booklet with essays and related literature. It is yet another potential DVD of the Year candidate from Criterion who continue to soar heads and tails above any other DVD production house anywhere in the world. If behind them are MK2 or Warner - either would be a distant second.

Image: Criterion's transfer is progressive in the 133:1 ratio and pictureboxed - with a black border circumventing the frame. For a detailed description of picture-boxing see our Kind Heart and Coronets review HERE. It appears the practice that many DVD-o-philes detest is continuing.

 

The Criterion website states:

'The original negative of the film is no longer available, so a new duplicate negative was created with wet gate processing from the original fine-grain master positive. This new high-definition digital transfer was created in 2k resolution on a Spirit Datacine from the new dupe negative. For the extensive restoration of Seven Samurai for this release, several different digital hardware and software solutions were utilized for flicker, instability, dirt, scratches and grain management including: daVinci’s Revival, Discreet’s Fire, Digital Vision’s ASCIII Advanced Scratch and Dirt Concealer, and MTI’s Digital Restoration System. To maintain optimal image quality through the compression process, the picture on this dual-layer DVD-9 was encoded at the highest-possible bit rate for the quantity of material included. '

You may be as ignorant as I am about many of those details listed above but the impressiveness of that litany of technological information is superseded by the very image itself (and the towering bitrate of the transfer), which has an appearance even beyond what many were anticipating. In viewing you may certainly notice at first how significantly cleaner it is with almost all of the large visible scratches, prevalent on other editions, irradiated (image # 2 - riding at dusk - below - is a good example as is the title image - # 1). Another are of extreme superiority is in the contrast - Criterion's REISSUE has more pure blacks and whites - it gives the impression of boosting on most of the other DVD releases. The Criterion is occasionally cropped - mostly along the right edge (sometimes left) - I have no explanation for this, but we have seen it before. There is still some very minor flickering in a couple of spots and light scratches infrequently visible. Both though are virtually non-existent. The cleanliness and improved black levels give the impression of advanced sharpness over the competition.

Frankly though, there really is no competition - this is so far ahead that visually (screen captures) comparing it seems to report it as an understatement. Criterion should be given a huge grant as what they are doing is helping pristinely archive some the greatest cinema the world has ever known. What they are achieving is really quite incredulous. The comparative improvement in this coveted films' digital rendering is one of the most flagrant I can recall. What adds to my amazement is that we are comparing it to 4 (no 5!) other editions - all of which drastically pale beside the REISSUE.   

Subtitles - another area where Criterion are tops - not only in translation but how appealing and unobtrusive they are to the eye. NOTE: they are using a slightly larger font size than we have seen in the past.

Audio - Criterion have the original Japanese mono track and have added a 4.0 upgrade option. In my first viewing I only listened to the mono track but sampled the 4.0 a few times. There is a drastic difference between the two with the 4.0 channel resonating far deeper and the mono sounding quite tinny at times. RE: the mono - although I have no hard evidence, to my ear it sounded like a slight improvement over the original Criterion release that I re-watched only a week earlier in preparation for this comparison. I could be wrong about that, but regardless I suspect many should listen to the 4.0 channel for the most dynamic sound. NOTE: It is often neglected how important the audio in Seven Samurai is - as it is often overshadowed by the striking visuals.

On the Criterion website it states:

'The new 4.0 mix was created from original optical track recordings, original stereo music masters, and original production sound effects masters. The original monaural soundtrack was mastered at 24-bit from on optical soundtrack print. Audio restoration tools were used to reduce clicks, pops, hiss, and crackle.'

Extras: The Criterion REISSUE has included the original adept Michael Jeck commentary plus a 2nd new one with film scholars David Desser, Joan Mellen, Stephen Prince, Tony Rayns, and Donald Richie passing off to each other through varying stages of the film. All are very good but I enjoyed Joan Mellen, Rayns (perfectly deft as always) and Richie's the most. Frankly, I think the multiple commentarians is a fantastic idea - you get different interpretations, fewer gaps and each seems an expert in one specific area without inducing the occasional boredom that sometimes comes from listening to one steady voice over an extended period. I hope we hear more of this DVD production attribute in the future. A great idea!

The Criterion duplicates the 50 minute Making of the Seven Samurai documentary shown on the CineKorea (originally part of the Toho Masterworks series). It features interviews with many Kurosawa collaborators. The REISSUE adds much more - the 2 hour 'My Life in Cinema' will be riveting for many Kurosawa fans, as will the new Seven Samurai: Origins and Influences documentary. There is a production gallery, 3 trailers and a teaser and the marvelous 56-page booklet, beautifully bound, filled with photographs as well as essays by Peter Cowie, Philip Kemp, Peggy Chiao, Alain Silver, Kenneth Turan, Stuart Galbraith, Arthur Penn, and Sidney Lumet and an interview with Toshiro Mifune.     

Conclusion - In my opinion the Criterion REISSUE package is essential for all fans of film. It is at once; educational, reaffirming, enlightening and painstakingly compiled. Unanimously hailed as one of the greatest masterpieces in the history of the motion picture the film has never looked better, excluding initial theatrical runs. Criterion's professionalism is an inspiration of achievement. No DVD collection is complete without it.

Comments: CineKorea + BFI

*****

ADDITION: CineKorea edition (Aug -05) - Frankly, I am a little tired of speculating whether some of these Korean DVDs are pirated transfers or not. We have asked the involved parties repeatedly yet are never given a conclusive answer.

I don't know where the CineKorea transfer came from but spread over two dual layered discs, it is the best - sharpest and least cropped - minimal damage - possibly progressive (find no evidence of 'combing') and from the correct standard (see times - no 'ghosting'). It has the same Michael Jeck commentary as the Criterion. It comes in a beautiful package with a booklet (albeit not in English but loaded with photos and images). Like the R4 release it offers both a mono and 5.1 audio option. The big plus for many will also be that it is Region 0 and NTSC meaning it can play in 'normal' DVD players in the US and Canada... and has optional English subtitles - that for the most part seem quite accurate.

I think this may have been taken from the Toho release and English and Korean subtitles added, but it doesn't really matter, I suppose. A negative would be the gaudy and large yellow subtitles and of, course that the 'Making of Seven Samurai' supplement does not have English subtitles. Other than that this appears to be the release to buy - tack onto that it is less than $30 and you have yourself a Kurosawa classic in its most appealing digital format.

*****

ADDITION: BFI edition (Dec -04) - The BFI release is similar to the Australian Region 4, but may be a shade sharper. The Criterion again shows to be the sharpest, if it does have some edge enhancement and some slight damage showing.

Worth noting again - "Aside from the opening Title, the Criterion (only their second release DVD) is sharper with a slight hint of brightness boosting and edge enhancement. The Criterion is very marginally cropped on all 4 sides. The AV Channel as the option of the original audio or boosted 5.1 soundtrack. Criterion wins the Extras with their Michael Jeck commentary. Criterion's hallmark contrast is superior, but the digital manipulations are evident."

Criterion announced a new release of Seven Samurai for 2005. I don't know the details, but that could be the definitive version and might be worth waiting for.

NOTE: The French edition shown (no English subs) is still no match for the Criterion.

*****

We are still doing some investigation as to the running times. The Criterion has an intermission (ex. not on the BFI disc), but I think the AV Channel also has this "intermission", but the running times are very close - meaning one is taken from an alternate type (PAL, NTSC) source. We will update this page as we come to a more definite conclusion.

It appears that the Toho Region 2 (Japan) release is still the sharpest although it does not have English subtitles . CLICK HERE to view.

We are still recommending the Criterion at this stage
.

- Gary W. Tooze

 

Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray Package

 

 


DVD Menus

 

Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC DISC 1

 

Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC DISC 2

Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC DISC 3



CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC (Discs 1 + 2)

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DVD Menus

(
Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - LEFT vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL - MIDDLE vs. AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - RIGHT)
 

 

 

Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 


 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Subtitle Sample

 

 TOP vs.  - NTSC BOTTOM

 

1) Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1 - NTSC TOP

2) CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

NOTE: not exact frame!

 


 

Screen Captures # 1

 

1) Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - THIRD

4) BFI - Region 2 - PAL - FOURTH

5) AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - FIFTH

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Here is an example of the French - Region 2 PAL edition (OOP- No English subs) listed HERE

 


Screen Captures # 2

 

1) Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - THIRD

4) BFI - Region 2 - PAL - FOURTH

5) AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - FIFTH

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Here is an example of the French - Region 2 PAL edition (OOP) listed HERE

 


Screen Captures # 3

 

1) Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - THIRD

4) BFI - Region 2 - PAL - FOURTH

5) AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - FIFTH

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Here is an example of the French - Region 2 PAL edition (OOP - No English subs) listed HERE

 

 


Screen Captures # 4

 

1) Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - THIRD

4) BFI - Region 2 - PAL - FOURTH

5) AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - FIFTH

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Here is an example of the French - Region 2 PAL edition (OOP - No English subs) listed HERE

 

 

More Criterion Blu-ray Captures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Criterion - REISSUE - Region 1- NTSC LEFT vs. CineKorea Co. - Region 0 - NTSC MIDDLE vs. Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

Thinking of buying from YesAsia? CLICK HERE and use THIS UPDATED BEAVER PAGE to source their very best...

 

 

 

 

Distribution

Criterion Collection REISSUE (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

CineKorea Co.

Region 0 - NTSC

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 1 - NTSC

(click titles for DVDBeaver reviews)

Criterion (without any extras) also available in The Essential Art House - 50 Years of Janus Films - a 50-disc celebration of international films collected under the auspices of the groundbreaking theatrical distributor. It contains Alexander Nevsky (1938), Ashes And Diamonds (1958), L'avventura (1960), Ballad Of A Soldier (1959), Beauty And The Beast (1946), Black Orpheus (1959), Brief Encounter (1945), The Fallen Idol (1948), Fires On The Plain (1959), Fists In The Pocket (1965), Floating Weeds (1959), Forbidden Games (1952), The 400 Blows (1959), Grand Illusion (1937), Häxan (1922), Ikiru (1952), The Importance Of Being Earnest (1952), Ivan The Terrible, Part II (1958), Le Jour Se Lève (1939), Jules And Jim (1962), Kind Hearts And Coronets (1949), Knife In The Water (1962), The Lady Vanishes (1938), The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp (1943), Loves Of A Blonde (1965), M (1931), M. Hulot's Holiday (1953), Miss Julie (1951), Pandora's Box (1929), Pépé Le Moko (1937), Il Posto (1961), Pygmalion (1938), Rashomon (1950), Richard III (1955), The Rules Of The Game (1939), Seven Samurai (1954), The Seventh Seal (1957), The Spirit Of The Beehive (1973), La Strada (1954), Summertime (1955), The Third Man (1949), The 39 Steps (1935), Ugetsu (1953), Umberto D. (1952), The Virgin Spring (1960), Viridiana (1961), The Wages Of Fear (1953), The White Sheik (1952), Wild Strawberries (1957), Three Documentaries By Saul J. Turell plus the hardcover, full color 240-page book.

 (BFI - Region 2 - PAL - LEFT vs. AV Channel - Region 4 - PAL - RIGHT)

 

 

 

BFI
Region 2 - PAL
AV Channel
Region 4 - PAL

Criterion Collection (Spine #2)

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 

Report Card:

Image:

Blu-ray

Sound:

Blu-ray

Extras: Blu-ray

.


Recommended Reading for Kurosawa Fans (CLICK COVERS or TITLES for more information)

 

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