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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

Directed by Leslie Norman
UK 1955

 

The Chinese theory that life is pre-ordained and that dreams are a glimpse into the future prompts Commander Lindsay (Michael Hordern, Where Eagles Dare) to relate a dream he has experienced to his fellow dinner guests, including Air Marshal Sir John Hardie (Michael Redgrave, The Captive Heart). The dream involves a Dakota aircraft carrying thirteen people, one of whom is Hardie. The plane is lost over the sea, the radio fails, and fuel is running short when, through a break in the clouds, a rock-strewn beach appears and the plane crashes horrifically. Lindsay then starts to live out his nightmare as different pieces from his dream start to fall into place. Are these similarities just coincidences or did his dream foretell the disaster? Ealing Studios veteran Leslie Norman (Dunkirk, X the Unknown) directed this thrilling and mysterious adventure yarn co-starring Alexander Knox (The Psychopath) and Denholm Elliott (The Sound Barrier).

***

At a fashionable dinner party in Hong Kong a Royal Navy officer is coaxed into revealing details of a dream in which eight persons take off from Bangkok in a Dakota bound for Tokyo and crash in the Japanese mountains. Amongst those listening is Air Marshal Hardie who is due to fly to Tokyo the next day. Hardie initially dismisses the dream because he is scheduled to fly out in a Liberator, but as Hardie arrives at the airport he discovers that the Liberator has developed mechanical problems and has been replaced by a Dakota. When, just before the flight is due to depart, two soldiers board the plane making a complement of eight, Hardie fears that the dream may be coming true and he is destined to die.

Posters

Theatrical Release: March 22nd, 1955

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Review: Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

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Distribution Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray
Runtime 1:35:47.783        
Video

1.33:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 30,967,363,476 bytes

Feature: 30,034,010,112 bytes

Video Bitrate: 37.91 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate Blu-ray:

Audio

DTS-HD Master Audio English 1554 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1554 kbps / 16-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 16-bit)
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

Subtitles English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio:
Kino

 

1.33:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 30,967,363,476 bytes

Feature: 30,034,010,112 bytes

Video Bitrate: 37.91 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

NEW Audio Commentary by Film Historian Samm Deighan
Theatrical Trailer (2:41 in HD)


Blu-ray Release Date:
May 19th, 2020
Standard Blu-ray Case

Chapters 9

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Kino Blu-ray (May 2020): Kino have transferred Leslie Norman's The Night My Number Came Up to Blu-ray. It is on a dual-layered disc with a max'ed out bitrate and looks very strong in 1080P. There are a few speckles but contrast is upper tier with pitch black levels and excellent shadow detail. The image is extremely clear with depth present - it is in the 1.33:1 aspect ratio and the HD presentation is very pleasing in-motion.

NOTE: We have added 56 more large resolution Blu-ray captures (in lossless PNG format) for DVDBeaver Patrons HERE

On their Blu-ray, Kino use a DTS-HD Master 2.0 channel track (16-bit) in the original English language. We have an abundance of plane engine sounds but nothing is overly aggressive carrying substantial depth - this is more in-line with the film production than the audio transfer effectiveness. There is a score by Malcolm Arnold (The Captain's Paradise, The Holly and the Ivy, Tunes of Glory, No Highway in the Sky. The Bridge On the River Kwai, Island in the Sun, Stolen Face, Hobson's Choice) and it adds another layer of suspense and mystery. Kino offer optional English subtitles on their Region 'A' Blu-ray.

The Kino Blu-ray offers a wonderful new commentary by film historian Samm Deighan who does an excellent job in trying to define a genre for The Night My Number Came Up. I learned about 'film blanc' which is a kind of bridge from fantasy-element features that couldn't be described as outright horror films - and were often comedies or musicals. She makes some great analysis quoting from two books; Celluloid Saviours: Angels, Deus Ex Machina and Reform Politics in Hollywood Film by Emily Caston and Giving Up the Ghost: Spirits, Ghosts, and Angels in Mainstream Comedy Films (Contemporary Approaches to Film and Media Series) by Katherine A. Fowkes. Samm mentions may of the other interesting fantasy films from Powell and Pressburger's A Matter of Life and Death to many others - more in the comedy vein. She makes the case that these were popular as they helped people accept their mortality - especially during the war. Her commentary goes to mentioning war-camps, Ealing, Leslie Norman, Denholm Elliott and significantly more. I found it extremely interesting - great job Samm! There is also an HD theatrical trailer.

I loved The Night My Number Came Up. It was akin to a full-length, British, Twilight Zone episode. It's a film with constantly building suspense, great performances and multi-layered themes regarding fear, death, premonition - forcing you to question your own response if thrust into that situation. The Kino Blu-ray is a keeper for me with a chilling and rewarding film experience plus the Samm Deighan commentary. Strongly recommended!

Gary Tooze

 


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Distribution Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray


 


 

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