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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

Directed by Hubert Cornfield
USA / UK 1969

 

The Higher the Stakes, the Higher the Terror! Screen greats Marlon Brando (On the Waterfront) and Richard Boone (The War Lord) star in this taut psychological thriller that examines the darkest impulses of the human psyche. A gang of four professional criminals brazenly kidnaps a wealthy teenage girl (Pamela Franklin, The Innocents) from an airport in Paris in a meticulous plan to extort money from the girl’s father. Holding her prisoner in an isolated beach house, the gang’s scheme runs perfectly until their personal demons surface and lead to a series of betrayals that culminate in a furious and explosive climax. The film that Time called “a keenly conducted seminar in the poetics of psychological terror” is a must-see for Brando fans. Co-written, produced and directed by Hubert Cornfield (Plunder Road) and co-starring Rita Moreno (West Side Story), Jess Hahn (Grand Duel) and Al Lettieri (Mr. Majestyk).

***

A gang of four professional criminals kidnaps a wealthy teenage girl from an airport in Paris in a meticulous plan to extort money from the girl's wealthy father. Holding her prisoner in an isolated beach house, the gang's scheme runs perfectly until their personal demons surface and lead to a series of betrayals.

Posters

Theatrical Release: February 19th, 1969

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Review: Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Box Cover

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Bonus Captures:

Distribution Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray
Runtime 1:33:22.597        
Video

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 31,053,203,788 bytes

Feature: 29,413,545,984 bytes

Video Bitrate: 37.91 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate Blu-ray:

Audio

DTS-HD Master Audio English 1554 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1554 kbps / 16-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 16-bit)
Commentaries:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

Subtitles English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio:
Kino

 

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 31,053,203,788 bytes

Feature: 29,413,545,984 bytes

Video Bitrate: 37.91 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

NEW Audio Commentary by Film Historian Tim Lucas
Audio Commentary by Director Hubert Cornfield
TRAILERS FROM HELL with Joe Dante (3:45)
Theatrical Trailer (3:04)


Blu-ray Release Date:
May 25th, 2021
Standard Blu-ray Case

Chapters 10

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Kino Blu-ray (May 2021): Kino have transferred Hubert Cornfield's The Night of the Following Day to Blu-ray. It is on a dual-layered disc with a max'ed out bitrate but the image has a few inconsistencies - no doubt, part of the source. Through most of the presentation it can look fairly pleasing but there are two sequences (one at around 40-minutes and a second at around the 1 1/4 mark) that are inordinately soft (see sample below.) I can't say what happened but it looks worse than a simple SD-bump. There is also one small instance of damage (see other sample below.) Many parts of the film in 1080P look quite tight and appealing with depth but other parts have a film-like thickness. Overall, it didn't hinder by enjoyment of the film experience.

NOTE: We have added 76 more large resolution Blu-ray captures (in lossless PNG format) for DVDBeaver Patrons HERE

On their Blu-ray, Kino use a DTS-HD Master 2.0 channel track (16-bit) in the original English language. The film has some later aggressive effects that come through with impact and a subtle jazz score by Stanley Myers (The Greek Tycoon, The Wind, The Wilby ConspiracyEureka, Cimino's The Deer Hunter, Roeg's Insignificance, Harold Becker's The Boost, Pete Walker House of Mortal Sin and Frightmare, etc.) including his own One Early Morning sung by Annie Ross. Kino offer optional English subtitles on their Region 'A' Blu-ray.

The Kino Blu-ray offers a new commentary by Tim Lucas. He cites biography's of Morena (Rita Moreno: A Memoir) and Brando (I think it was "Brando: Songs My Mother Taught Me") - their previous relationship and subsequent pregnancy and abortion of the child, how Pamela Franklin had made such an impression on him in his younger years, he talks about director/writer Hubert Cornfield, disagreements with the often enigmatic and self-destructive Brando (no surprise), Richard Boone (who directed sequences), most of the minor supporting cast and some crew (cinematographer Willy Kurant - Orson Welles' The Immortal Story) with references to their filmographies, touches later seen in The Night of the Following Day as influenced by the Belgian surrealist artist René François Ghislain Magritte and significantly more. It's wonderfully informative and, as always, interesting - exporting anecdotes and details from a myriad of sources. Lucas is certainly one of the very best commentarists. There is also a commentary from producer/director Hubert Cornfield, previously found on the 2005 Marlon Brando 4-Movie DVD Collection. Unfortunately while the details he imparts are fascinating, he appears to be using a electrolarynx, sometimes referred to as a "throat back" as he was having voice issues. It can be quite grating listening throughout but he does tell how Stanley Kubrick had the rights to the Lionel White novel although Hollywood had a 'ban' on kidnapping films. Cornfield tells how he eventually got around that utilizing the British film Dead of Night plot and making it a premonition/dream. There is also a Trailers From Hell episode with Joe Dante as well as a theatrical trailer for the film.     

Well, The Night of the Following Day is not a typical thriller, but I found it nonetheless satisfying. It's very character driven with excellent performances from the cast including Richard Boone's 'Leer' as a particularly unsavory psychopath. Brando effortlessly carries his screen-time and there is a lot going on between the characters with the kidnapping details less fleshed-out. I enjoyed it as will those who find Brando fascinating. The Kino Blu-ray has plenty of value with the two illuminating commentaries. Yes, I definitely think this is worth picking up and it's a film I will revisit soon.

Gary Tooze

 


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Drop in quality

 

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Frame -specific damage

 

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Bonus Captures:

Distribution Kino - Region 'A' - Blu-ray


 


 

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