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A view on Blu-ray by Gary W. Tooze

Dheepan [Blu-ray]

 

(Jacques Audiard, 2015)

 

 

Review by Gary Tooze

 

Production:

Theatrical: Why Not Productions

Video: Criterion Collection Spine #871

 

Disc:

Region: 'A' (as verified by the Oppo Blu-ray player)

Runtime: 1:54:55.513 

Disc Size: 47,340,571,788 bytes

Feature Size: 34,754,629,632 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.66 Mbps

Chapters: 18

Case: Transparent Blu-ray case

Release date: May 23rd, 2017

 

Video:

Aspect ratio: 2.41:1

Resolution: 1080p / 23.976 fps

Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio French 3362 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3362 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio French 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

 

Subtitles:

English, English (for the commentary), none

 

Extras:
Audio commentary from 2015 featuring Audiard and co-screenwriter Noé Debré (in French with optional English subtitles)
New interview with Audiard (21:14)
New interview with actor Antonythasan Jesuthasan (21:52)
Deleted scenes with audio commentary from 2015 by Audiard and Debré (9:03)
Trailer (2:02)
PLUS: An essay by critic Michael Atkinson

 

Bitrate:

 

 

 

Description: With this Palme d’Or–winning drama, which deftly combines seemingly disparate genres, French filmmaker Jacques Audiard cemented his status as a titan of contemporary world cinema. In an arresting performance, the nonprofessional actor Antonythasan Jesuthasan (himself a former child soldier) stars as a Tamil fighter who, along with a woman and a child posing as his wife and daughter, flees war-torn Sri Lanka only to land in a Paris suburb blighted by drugs. As the makeshift family embarks on a new life, Dheepan settles into an intimate social-realist mode before tightening into a dynamic turf-war thriller, as well as an unsettling study of the psychological aftereffects of combat. Searing and sensitive, Audiard’s film is a unique depiction of the refugee experience as a continuous crisis of identity.

 

 

The Film:

Winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, the new film from acclaimed director Jacques Audiard (A Prophet, The Beat that My Heart Skipped) is a gripping, human tale of survival. On the losing side of a civil war in Sri Lanka, a Tamil soldier (Antonythasan Jesuthasan) poses as the husband and father of two other refugees in order to escape their ravaged homeland. Arriving in France, the makeshift "family" sets about establishing a new life—only to find themselves once again embroiled in violence on the mean streets of Paris. A heartrending saga of three strangers united by circumstance and struggle, Dheepan is both a tour-de-force thriller and a powerful depiction of the immigrant experience.

Excerpt from Slant Magazine located HERE

There is such exhilarating movie mastery in this powerful new film about Tamil refugees in France from director Jacques Audiard, who gave us A Prophet, Rust and Bone and The Beat that My Heart Skipped. It’s bulging with giant confidence and packed with outbursts of that mysterious epiphanic grandeur, like moments of sunlight breaking through cloud-cover, with which Audiard endows apparently normal sequences and everyday details. There is also something not always found in movies or books or TV drama – that is to say, intelligent and sympathetic interest in other human beings. Every scene, every line, every frame has something of interest. All of it is impeccably crafted and the work of someone for whom making films is as natural as breathing.

Excerpt from TheGuardian located HERE

Image :    NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

Dheepan looks as pristine and excellent, as you would expect a new film to, on Blu-ray from Criterion and is cited as a "High-definition digital master, supervised by director Jacques Audiard and cinematographer Éponine Momenceau".  I have the aspect ratio at about 2.4:1 and the image quality is flawless. Colors (reds, yellows and greens) show modest richness, contrast is exceptional and the visuals are are impressively realistic. The camera is very kinetic with plenty of human motion with depth frequently apparent.  This dual-layered Blu-ray, with max'ed out bitrate, reproduces a dynamic 1080P presentation.

 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Feature subtitle sample

 

 

Optional Commentary subtitle sample

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audio :

Criterion utilize a DTS-HD Master 5.1 surround in the original French, Tamil and some English at 3362 kbps (24-bit). It sounds flawless with some shocking depth and surprising separation in the film's most aggressive scenes. There is a score, credited to Nicolas Jaar but there is a variety of music in the film from Vivaldi and The Maestro Ilaiyaraaja to S-Crew and The Brian Jonestown Massacre. It sounds wonderful and clean adding a touch of resonance. There are optional English subtitles for both the feature and the French-language commentary and my Oppo has identified it as being a region 'A' disc.

 

Extras :

Criterion include an audio commentary from 2015 featuring Audiard and co-screenwriter Noé Debré. It is in French with optional English subtitles and they are very frank about the production divulging small and significant details in bringing the project to fruition. There is also a new, 21-minute, interview with Audiard conducted in Paris, by Criterion, in February 2017. It's a different look at the film, than the commentary, by the director and is worth the indulgence. There is also a new, 22-minute interview with actor/writer Antonythasan Jesuthasan conducted at the same time and reveals some of his life being distraught by the Black July anti-Tamil riots of 1983, he joined the militant Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) as a "helper" when he was around 15 years old. He is fascinating to listen to. There are 9-minutes of deleted scenes with audio commentary from 2015 by Audiard and Debré plus a trailer. The package has a liner notes boojklet with an essay by critic Michael Atkinson.

 

 

BOTTOM LINE:
Dheepan is a film that will blow you away with its impact. It singular stories draw you in to their desperation, injustice and survivalism. It's heat-achingly human and deserves all its accolades. This Blu-ray is a very strong recommendation. Criterion's package adds even further value with the commentary, interviews and booklet. DO NOT miss this one!

Gary Tooze

April 20th, 2017


 

About the Reviewer: Hello, fellow Beavers! I have been interested in film since I viewed a Chaplin festival on PBS when I was around 9 years old. I credit DVD with expanding my horizons to fill an almost ravenous desire to seek out new film experiences. I currently own approximately 9500 DVDs and have reviewed over 5000 myself. I appreciate my discussion Listserv for furthering my film education and inspiring me to continue running DVDBeaver. Plus a healthy thanks to those who donate and use our Amazon links.

Although I never wanted to become one of those guys who focused 'too much' on image and sound quality - I find HD is swiftly pushing me in that direction.

Gary's Home Theatre:

60-Inch Class (59.58” Diagonal) 1080p Pioneer KURO Plasma Flat Panel HDTV PDP6020-FD

Oppo Digital BDP-83 Universal Region FREE Blu-ray/SACD Player
Momitsu - BDP-899 Region FREE Blu-ray player
Marantz SA8001 Super Audio CD Player
Marantz SR7002 THX Select2 Surround Receiver
Tannoy DC6-T (fronts) + Energy (centre, rear, subwoofer) speakers (5.1)

APC AV 1.5 kVA H Type Power Conditioner 120V

Gary W. Tooze

 

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