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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "The Beat that My Heart Skipped' or 'De battre mon coeur s'est arrêté" )

 

directed by Jacques Audiard
France 2005

 

In tune with the theme of the film, ”The Beat that my Heart Skipped” is more a variation of James Toback’s 1978 “Fingers”, than a reversion or remake. While characters, situations and plot elements are shared, mood and tone are different, similar to the same melody being played in two different variations and styles.

Looking solely on “The Beat that my Heart Skipped”, it (still) is a stunning and intense character study of a man torn between two worlds, the one dominated by his father and crime, the other by his talent and passion for music.

In many ways, I prefer Audiard’s variation to the one by Toback. Its tone and mood is more erratic, more distracted, having a hard time focussing, which adds strength to the struggles of Thomas Seyr, who never seem to be able to focus, except when committing acts of violence or playing the piano. His mind is not only torn between these two worlds, but also between the legacy of his late mother, who played the piano, and his gangster father, who has grown old, as well as between working on a project with some friends and his own project of playing the piano.

The mise-en-scene by Audiard is also more free and fluid than Toback, as if it doesn’t have to make a point of each composition, but just record it. One can argue that Audiard’s variation is liberated from the formulaic Hollywood style, which forces us – the audience – to pay attention, rather than the mise-en-scene to force attention upon us.

With a stunning performance by Romain Duris as Thomas Seyr, “The Beat that my Heart Skipped” is a painful character study of a man who attempts to find not only himself but also his place in the world. Not to be missed.

Henrik Sylow

Posters

Theatrical Release: February 17, 2005 (Berlin International Film Festival)

Reviews                                                                                     More Reviews                                                                        DVD Reviews

 

Comparison:

Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL vs. Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Big thanks to Henrik Sylow for the DVD Review!

 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL LEFT
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray RIGHT

 

Box Covers

 

Distribution

Artificial Eye

Region 2 - PAL

Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray
Runtime 1:42:21 (4% PAL Speedup) 1:46:31.041
Video

1.82:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.39 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 47,174,523,991 bytes

Feature: 28,163,850,240 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.00 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Bitrate Blu-ray

Audio 2.0 Dolby Digital French, 5.1 Dolby Digital French LPCM Audio French 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit
DTS-HD Master Audio
French 1688 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1688 kbps / 16-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48
kHz / 1509 kbps / 16-bit)
Subtitles English, None English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Artificial Eye

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.82:1

Edition Details:
Interviews
• - Jacques Audiard (17:56)
• - Jacques Audiard UK Exclusive (31:35)
• - Tonino Benacquista (8:22)
• - Alexandre Desplat (5:43)
• 34 Deleted Scenes (24:44)
• Rehearsal Footage (9:48)
• Q&A London October 6th 2005 (49:09)
• Original Theatrical Trailer (1:58)

DVD Release Date: March 26th, 2006
Double Amaray

Chapters 16

Release Information:
Studio: Curzon / Artificial Eye
 

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 47,174,523,991 bytes

Feature: 28,163,850,240 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.00 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

Interviews
• - Jacques Audiard (18:41)
• - Jacques Audiard UK Exclusive (32:53)
• - Tonino Benacquista (8:43)
• - Alexandre Desplat (5:58)
• 34 Deleted Scenes (25:45)
• Rehearsal Footage (10:13)
• Q&A London October 6th 2005 (51:05)

Romain Duris (0:41)
• Original Theatrical Trailer (2:02)


Blu-ray Release Date: March 14th, 2016
Standard
Blu-ray Case
Chapters: 12

 

 

 

Comments

NOTE: These Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

 

ADDITION: Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray (February 16'): The HD visuals show their superiority in the usual areas - contrast, detail and depth - all subtle improvements but visible regardless, especially in-motion. It's dual-layered with a high bitrate and no more PAL speedup. The DVD has a slight green cast but was still excellent for SD a decade ago. The Blu-ray, however, is noticeably better.

 

The Curzon / Artificial Eye Blu-ray of The Beat That Skipped My Heart offers the choice of a DTS-HD Master 5.1 at 1688 kbps or the option of a 2.0 channel linear PCM stereo at 1536 kbps. It has hints of separation but everything is of a gentle nature with only a couple of highly aggressive fight sequences. Aside from minor effects we get the piano music - JS Bach (Toccata en ré mineur etc.), Mozart (Sonate en do mineur), Tchaikovsky (Concerto 1), Liszt (Après une lecture de Dante), Brahms (2ème Rhapsodie) played beautifully by Caroline Duris (sister to the star Romain Duris!) -  and another impressive score by Alexandre Desplat (The Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, The Ghost Writer, The King's Speech, Venus in Fur) - the music sounds great via the lossless. There are optional English subtitles and my Oppo has identified it as being a region 'B'-locked.

 

Supplements duplicate the DVD with over 2.5 hours worth (now in NTSC time) of in-depth and revealing interviews, deleted scenes, rehearsal footage, a Q&A etc.

 

It's not often that the French remake an American film and I really enjoyed Toback’s 1978 “Fingers with the young Harvey Keitel. It's a very interesting premise and this remake is an excellent film in its own right. Nice to see it reach Blu-ray - strongly recommended!

***

ON THE DVD: A stunning transfer. Flawless, no artifacts, original colour palette. It simply looks beautiful.

Sound comes in either 2.0 Dolby Digital or 5.1 Dolby Digital, and here I prefer the 2.0, as it sounds more "focused" than the surround.

Additional material consists of four quiet in-depth interviews in regards to film, material, source and thematics, some deleted scenes and an excellent Q&A.

 - Henrik Sylow




DVD Menus

 

 

Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Screen Captures
 

 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL TOP
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL TOP
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL TOP
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL TOP
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

1) Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL TOP
2) Curzon / Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

More Blu-ray Captures



Box Covers

 

Distribution

Artificial Eye

Region 2 - PAL

Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray




 

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