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A view on Blu-ray by Gary W. Tooze

The In-Laws [Blu-ray]

 

(Arthur Hiller, 1979)

 

  

Coming to Blu-ray in the UK by Criterion in August 2016:

 

Review by Gary Tooze

 

Production:

Theatrical: Warner Bros.

Video: Criterion Collection Spine #823

 

Disc:

Region: 'A'  - UK - 'B'(as verified by the Oppo Blu-ray player)

Runtime: 1:42:56.670 

Disc Size: 46,267,218,594 bytes

Feature Size: 30,319,558,656 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.90 Mbps

Chapters: 21

Case: Transparent Blu-ray case

Release date: July 5th, 2016 (UK - August 15th)

 

Video:

Aspect ratio: 1.85:1

Resolution: 1080p / 23.976 fps

Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

 

Subtitles:

English (SDH), none

 

Extras:

• Audio commentary from 2003 featuring director Arthur Hiller, actors Alan Arkin and Peter Falk, and writer Andrew Bergman
New interview with Arkin (24:08)
In Support of “The In-Laws,” a new interview program featuring actors Ed Begley Jr., Nancy Dussault, James Hong, and David Paymer (34:07)
Trailer (2:47)
PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by comedy writer Stephen Winer and a 2011 recollection of the making of the film by Hiller

 

Bitrate:

 

 

 

Description: Peter Falk and Alan Arkin make for a hilarious dream team in this beloved American sidesplitter. Directed by Arthur Hiller from an ingenious script by Andrew Bergman, The In-Laws may at first seem like a generic meet-the-parents comedy, as Arkin’s mild-mannered dentist suspiciously eyes Falk’s volatile mystery man, whose son is engaged to his daughter. But soon, through a series of events too serpentine and surprising to spoil, the two men are brought together by a dangerous mission that takes them from suburban New Jersey to Honduras. Fueled by elaborate stunt work and the laconic, naturalistic charms of its two stars, The In-Laws deserves its status as a madcap classic—and has continued to draw ardent fans in the years since its release.

 

 

The Film:

Dentist Sheldon Kornpett (Alan Arkin) is a respectable man. He has a daughter who is about to marry the son of a very suspicious character, Vince Ricardo (Peter Falk). They are practically relatives already, the wedding is so near. Certainly, Sheldon already despises Vince as if he were already a well-known relative. Nontheless, Vince calls on Sheldon and convinces him to go with him on a series of wild and hilarious adventures, claiming all the while that he is a CIA agent, and that what he is doing is in the national interest. Sheldon follows Vince to a South American country ruled by a very odd man, General Garcia (Richard Libertini), who talks to his hand (which talks back). It seems that the dictator is involved in a scheme to counterfeit and undermine U.S. currency.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

I was laughing so hard at "The In-Laws," a wonderful new comedy of errors opening today at the Beekman and other theaters, that after a while I was crying. Then I was wiping my eyes. Then I forgot to take any more notes. And now I can't remember exactly what was so funny. When anything is that funny, though, maybe the fine points don't matter.

"The In-Laws" is certainly not a movie for anyone interested in fine points. As directed by Arthur Hiller, it is, at best, a happy shambles, and it gets off to a muddy start. A Federal security truck is robbed, with the theft masterminded by Peter Falk; not so interesting, since Mr. Falk has lately been seen plotting a similar heist in "The Brink's Job." But wait. The truck is full of money, and the thieves don't even want it; they're after something else. This is the first of a number of new wrinkles.

It is dinnertime, and Mr. Falk and Alan Arkin are meeting for the first time. Mr. Arkin is playing one of the world's foremost dentists, and surely Mr. Falk is playing one of the world's great straight men. The dentist's daughter is scheduled to be married only a day or two later to the robber's son, but a lot will be happening between now and then.

Excerpt from Janet Maslin at the NY Times located HERE

 

Image :    NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

The In-Laws on Blu-ray from Criterion is advertised as from a "2K digital transfer" and it looks quite pleasing recalling the thicker-grade image quality of the late 70's to mid 80's. Colors are bright and there is texture. Contrast is adept and I can't image the film looking any better for your digital consumption. There minimal depth and no noise and this representation seems to adhere to the authenticity of the original production roots.

 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audio :

Criterion use a linear PCM mono track at 1152 kbps (24-bit) adhering to the original sound quality. It's flat but consistent and with some depth in the effects. The score is by John Morris (The Elephant Man, Young Frankenstein, Clue) and it sounds light and fun - some may notice "Buffalo Gals" being played. There are optional English (SDH) subtitles and my Oppo has identified it as being a region 'A' disc, although the UK disc will, presumably be region 'B'-locked.

 

Extras :

Criterion include the audio commentary from 2003 featuring director Arthur Hiller, actors Alan Arkin and Peter Falk, and writer Andrew Bergman. Plus there is a new 24-minute interview with Arkin and a new 1/2 piece entitled In Support of “The In-Laws”. It's a new interview program featuring actors Ed Begley Jr., Nancy Dussault, James Hong, and David Paymer about the making of the film and their experiences with the production, filmmakers and cast. lastly we get a trailer and the package has a booklet featuring an excellent essay by comedy writer Stephen Winer that I'd strongly recommend checking out - it's a wonderful addition - and a 2011 recollection of the making of the film by Arthur Hiller.

 

 

 

BOTTOM LINE:
What an absolutely hilarious film. Both Arkin and Falk are so good in comedic roles - and this buddy-comedy is a prime example. They are supported wonderfully here. Andrew Bergman's (Blazing Saddles) screenplay is delightfully offbeat and filled with zany-ness. Criterion have created the definitive package of this brilliant comedy with their Blu-ray release. We strongly recommend it - I can see myself revisiting this for years to come. What a great time. 

Gary Tooze

June 16th, 2016

 

  

Coming to Blu-ray in the UK by Criterion in August 2016:


 

About the Reviewer: Hello, fellow Beavers! I have been interested in film since I viewed a Chaplin festival on PBS when I was around 9 years old. I credit DVD with expanding my horizons to fill an almost ravenous desire to seek out new film experiences. I currently own approximately 9500 DVDs and have reviewed over 5000 myself. I appreciate my discussion Listserv for furthering my film education and inspiring me to continue running DVDBeaver. Plus a healthy thanks to those who donate and use our Amazon links.

Although I never wanted to become one of those guys who focused 'too much' on image and sound quality - I find HD is swiftly pushing me in that direction.

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60-Inch Class (59.58” Diagonal) 1080p Pioneer KURO Plasma Flat Panel HDTV PDP6020-FD

Oppo Digital BDP-83 Universal Region FREE Blu-ray/SACD Player
Momitsu - BDP-899 Region FREE Blu-ray player
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Marantz SR7002 THX Select2 Surround Receiver
Tannoy DC6-T (fronts) + Energy (centre, rear, subwoofer) speakers (5.1)

APC AV 1.5 kVA H Type Power Conditioner 120V

Gary W. Tooze

 

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