We have started a Patreon page with the hopes that some of our followers would be willing to donate a small amount to keep DVDBeaver alive. We are a tiny niche, so your generosity is vital to our existence.

We are talking about a minimum of $0.10 - $0.15 a day, perhaps a quarter (or more) to those who won't miss it from their budget. It equates to buying DVDBeaver a coffee once, twice or a few times a month. You can then participate in our monthly Silent auctions, and have exclusive access to many 'bonus' High Resolution screen captures - both 4K UHD and Blu-ray (see HERE).

To those that are unfamiliar, Patreon is a secure/verified third-party service where users can agree to a monthly donation via credit card or PayPal by clicking the button below.


 

Search DVDBeaver

S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/Tourneur.htm
USA 1943

 

A superior horror film from the partnership of producer Val Lewton and director Tourneur. A travelling zoo loses a leopard after a publicity stunt in a New Mexico town, and soon after there are a series of gruesome killings. The police and townsfolk are peering into every shadow to find the big cat, which could leap out on them at any moment, but remain baffled by aspects of the deaths. Their doubts are confirmed when the killings continue even after the body of the cat is discovered. Then the real fear begins. Not a starry cast, but good acting and some real jump-out-of-the-seat moments.

Excerpt from Channel 4 located HERE

***

Adapted from the Cornell Woolrich novel Black Alibi, The Leopard Man is a lesser but still fascinating psychological-horror effort from producer Val Lewton. Someone has been killing off the citizens of a small New Mexico town, and the most likely suspect is a huge leopard, purchased for a local nightclub act by press agent Jerry Manning (Dennis O'Keefe), which has escaped from its cage. Neither Manning nor his star Clo-Clo (Margo) are totally convinced that the big cat is responsible. The haunting finale takes place during the annual "Day of the Dead" festivities. The opening sequence of Leopard Man, atmospherically detailing the last few moments of murder victim Teresa Delgado (Margaret Landry), is so powerful that the rest of the film seems anticlimactic. Long available only in its 59-minute reissue form, the film was restored to its original 65-minute running time in the mid-1980s.

Excerpt from B+N located HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: May 8th, 1943

Reviews                                                                                                       More Reviews                                                                                       DVD Reviews

 

Comparison:

Warner (Val Lewton Box) - Region 1 - NTSC vs. Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Box Cover

  

  

Bonus Captures:

Distribution

Warner

Region 1 - NTSC

Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray
Runtime 1.05.59         1:06:04.000 
Video 1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.29 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.33:1 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 21,862,959,796 bytes

Feature: 19,575,109,632 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.94 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Bitrate Blu-ray:

Audio

Dolby 2.0

DTS-HD Master Audio English 2062 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2062 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / DN -4dB
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / DN -4dB

Subtitles English, French, Spanish, None English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Filmmaker William Friedkin commentary
• Theatrical trailer

DVD Release Date: Oct. 4, 2005
keep case

Chapters 22

Release Information:
Studio:
Shout! Factory

 

1.33:1 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 21,862,959,796 bytes

Feature: 19,575,109,632 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.94 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

NEW Audio Commentary With Filmmaker/Film Historian Constantine Nasr
Audio Commentary With Filmmaker William Friedkin
Theatrical Trailer (1:05)
Still Gallery (8:36)


Blu-ray Release Date:
July 30th, 2019
Standard Blu-ray Case

Chapters 12

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Shout! Factory Blu-ray (July 2019): Shout! Factory have transferred Jacques Tourneur's The Leopard Man to Blu-ray and it is a very welcome advancement over the lackluster DVD from 2005. It is advertised as a new "4K Scan Of The Original Nitrate Camera Negative". It towers over the murky SD appearing brighter, far more detailed and has some pleasing textures in the 1080P resolution. It is on a single-layered disc but the short feature embraces a max'ed out bitrate looking much cleaner and tighter in-motion. The softness is inherent in the production and produces a film-like presentation experience.

NOTE: 22 more full resolution (1920 X 1080) captures for Patrons are available HERE.

On their Blu-ray, Shout! Factory use a, reasonably robust, DTS-HD Master 2.0 channel mono track (24-bit) in the original English language. It is another advancement in the film's audio and score by Roy Webb (A Bill of Divorcement, Notorious, The Spiral Staircase, The Curse of the Cat People, I Married a Witch, The Fallen Sparrow, The Window, Journey Into Fear, I Walked with a Zombie etc.) that adds further atmosphere. Shout! Factory offer optional English subtitles on their Region 'A' Blu-ray.

The Shout! Factory Blu-ray includes the same audio commentary with director William Friedkin (that Adam found a disappointment - see below) from the old DVD but they also add a new fact-filled commentary by the director of Shadows in the Dark: The Val Lewton Legacy  Constantine Nasr (author of Roger Corman: Interviews (Conversations with Filmmakers Series). The discussion revolves a lot around Lewton and his preferences, some of the cast and Jacques Tourneur. It's quite interesting and has plenty of information I was not aware of about the producer. There is also a short theatrical trailer and extensive stills gallery.

One of the richest of short horrors - Jacques Tourneur is a poet and this is a thoroughly re-watchable effort. It's a film I am very thrilled to own on 4K-restored Blu-ray with the new commentary. An easy, and very strong, recommendation! 

Gary Tooze

ON THE DVD: The transfer: A seriously flawed transfer from Warner’s, which is a shame given that this is the only real fault in otherwise stupendous boxset (think of Criterion’s Renoir box and the tragedy that is The Golden Coach transfer). Lots of dirt and scratches are prevalent throughout the film, and considering how much of Tourneur’s work depends upon his play between light and shadows, you may find these print blemishes more noticeable than usual. The major flaw is the appearance of an obtrusive black line on the right hand side of the frame that rears its ugly face at about the 20-minute mark and continues to appear off and on for the remainder of the film. Whether this ‘black line’ is the result of a botched transfer or was present on the original filmic elements I cannot say, but I suspect that once others have taken a look at the disc, we will be able to report back to you with more details.

The transfer on The Ghost Ship fairs much better fortunately (see below). Present here, are Warner’s usual standards of high quality, sharp progressively scanned image, relatively dirt free and glistening with a life that we associate with only the best transfers of 1940’s black and white films on DVD.

The audio: Each transfer sounds relatively the same, and depending if you are listening to these through your TV set or through a home sound system, your impressions might vary. Each film is presented with a mono audio track. Played through your set this audio can sound a little flat and muted, but played through a sound system (which I assume it was optimized for) the audio is clear. A picky observation perhaps, but something for you to keep in mind before viewing.

Extras: Keeping the trend of The Leopard Man transfer, the William Friedkin commentary track is also a disappointment. Friedkin offers none of the meaty observations you’d suspect a filmmaker to offer up, and instead you get hour-long snooze fest where the filmmaker simply dictates the events that happen onscreen. I recommend skipping over this one and devoting your time to one of the Film historian commentaries on the other discs, preferably Tom Weaver’s on Bedlam.

 - Adam Lemke

 


Warner - Region 1- NTSC

 

Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

1) Warner - Region 1- NTSC - TOP

2) Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) Warner - Region 1- NTSC - TOP

2) Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) Warner - Region 1- NTSC - TOP

2) Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) Warner - Region 1- NTSC - TOP

2) Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


1) Warner - Region 1- NTSC - TOP

2) Shout! Factory -  Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 


 

More full resolution (1920 X 1080) Blu-ray Captures for DVDBeaver Patreon Supporters HERE

 


 
Box Cover

  

  

Bonus Captures:

Distribution

Warner

Region 1 - NTSC

Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 


 

Search DVDBeaver

S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

 

Hit Counter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DONATIONS Keep DVDBeaver alive:

 CLICK PayPal logo to donate!

Gary Tooze

Thank You!