Firstly, a HUGE thanks to our Patreon supporters. Your generosity touches me deeply. These supporters have become the single biggest contributing factor to the survival of DVDBeaver. Your assistance has become essential. We are always trying to expand Patron benefits... you get access to the Silent Auctions and over 5000 unpublished screen captures (in lossless PNG format, if that has appeal for you) listed HERE. Please consider helping with $3 or more each month so we can continue to do our best in giving you timely, thorough reviews, calendar updates and detailed comparisons. Thank you so much. We aren't going to exist without another 100 or so patrons.


 

Search DVDBeaver

S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "Macabro" or "The Frozen Terror")

 

Directed by Lamberto Bava
Italy 1980

 

Lamberto Bava was taught his trade by his father, horror legend Mario Bava. Macabre, his first film as director, showed how well he'd learnt his lessons.

Still recovering from a pair of tragic and traumatic bereavements, Jane Baker (Bernice Steggers; Xtro, Sky Pilots) moves into a new apartment in New Orleans. The owner's son, Robert, is blind but that doesn't stop him hearing what Jane gets up to. It sounds like she's resumed her passionate affair with her lover, Fred. Except that Fred died a year ago...

Not quite a giallo, not quite a ghost story and with a final twist that will make you re-think everything you've already seen, Macabre showed that Bava Jr. who'd go on to make the horror classic Demons was a chip off the old block..

***

New Orleans. Long, hot summers. Beautiful, decaying buildings. Frustrated housewives. After a long apprenticeship working with his father Mario and with Dario Argento, Lamberto Bava jumped straight in at the deep end with this one, and it really paid off. It's based on the true story of a woman who remained somewhat unusually attached to her dead lover, and was originally conceived as a joke but soon developed into a full blown gothic melodrama alternating between dark humour, gruesome revelations and high camp.

Bernice Stegers, looking like a refugee from Dynasty but with heavier make-up, is Jane, a bored mother who likes to while away the afternoons with her lover in a guest house. One day she gets a telephone call telling her that something terrible has happened to her young son, and in her rush to get back she crashes her car; she is injured and her lover is decapitated.

Excerpt from Eye For Film located HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: April 17th, 1980

Reviews                                                                                                       More Reviews                                                                                       DVD Reviews

 

Review: 88 Films - Region FREE - Blu-ray

Box Cover

CLICK to order from:

Bonus Captures:

Distribution 88 Films - Region FREE - Blu-ray
Runtime 1:29:47.590        
Video

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 34,236,892,647 bytes

Feature: 27,726,145,536 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.99 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate Blu-ray:

Audio

DTS-HD Master Audio English 1774 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1774 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio Italian 1779 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1779 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

Subtitles English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio:
88 Films

 

1.85:1 1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 34,236,892,647 bytes

Feature: 27,726,145,536 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.99 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

Don't Lose Your Head - An Interview with Director Lamberto Bava (22:04)
Audio Commentary by Troy Howarth and Nathaniel Thompson
Italian Opening and Closing Credits (3:33)
Trailer (2:16)

Reversible Sleeve featuring Original Poster and VHS artwork

12-page liner notes booklet with photos and essay by Rachael Nisbet


Blu-ray Release Date:
May 18th, 2020
Transparent Blu-ray Case inside slipcase

Chapters 9

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: 88 Films Blu-ray (May 2020): 88 Films have transferred Lamberto Bava's Macabre to Blu-ray. It is cited as being from a "NEW 2K Restoration from the Original Camera Negative". It looks quite pleasing on a dual-layered disc with a max'ed out bitrate. The image quality is clean and consistent - a smidgeon of color depth in some of Bernice Stegers' dresses. Not a ton of depth but there is a film-like grittiness. No complaints. 

NOTE: We have added 67 more large resolution Blu-ray captures (in lossless PNG format) for DVDBeaver Patrons HERE

On their Blu-ray, 88 Films use DTS-HD Master dual-mono tracks (24-bit) in both the Italian or English language DUB. The film doesn't have much in the way of audio effects or even music with a score credited to Ubaldo Continiello (Jungle Holocaust, Play Motel, Live Like a Cop, Die Like a Man) that was fairly sparsely utilized. 88 Films offer optional English subtitles on their Region FREE Blu-ray.

The 88 Films Blu-ray offers an audio commentary by Troy Howarth and Nathaniel Thompson who cover many topics including the ineffective marketing of the title Frozen Terror, Lamberto's films having poor DUB'ing, how he was more of a journeyman type filmmaker rather than expressing the flair and the creativity of his father. They discuss films of Lamberto's that they appreciate like Body Puzzle, Blade in the Dark (but in Italian). These guys are great - I especially appreciate the discussion of how spoilt we are - getting hyper-anal about cover-art etc. - as opposed to the value of simply seeing the film. Hear hear! I enjoyed it enough to probably revisit one day. There is a 22-minute interview with director Lamberto Bava entitled Don't Lose Your Head - and 88 Films include the Italian opening and closing credits, a trailer while the package itself has ac reversible sleeve (see below) featuring original poster and VHS artwork and there is a 12-page liner notes booklet with photos and essay by Rachael Nisbet.

Macabre makes its journey into the Giallo genre - partly by virtue of Lamberto's formidable lineage, rather than the use of black gloves, Justerini & Brooks whiskey or light flashing on wielded knives. Macabre has a languid pace but is actually a very decent film - part mystery and part psychological fetish thriller. Macabre has plenty going for it including pleasing a/v, a commentary and another nice Blu-ray package from 88 Films with reversible artwork and a booklet. A keeper for fans. Thumbs up!

Gary Tooze

 


Menus / Extras

 


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

More full resolution (1920 X 1080) Blu-ray Captures for DVDBeaver Patreon Supporters HERE

 

 

 
Box Cover

CLICK to order from:

Bonus Captures:

Distribution 88 Films - Region FREE - Blu-ray


 


 

Search DVDBeaver

S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

 

Hit Counter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DONATIONS Keep DVDBeaver alive:

 CLICK PayPal logo to donate!

Gary Tooze

Thank You!