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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

Directed by Leigh Jason
USA 1947

 

If when the cat's away the mice will play... then henpecked husband Arthur Earthleigh is due for a real rave-up of a weekend when his domineering wife Mae (Carole Landis) goes out of town to visit her sister.

After dropping off his wife at Grand Central Station, Arthur (George Brent) plans to dine alone at a local restaurant, but unexpectedly meets up with tipsy flibbertigibbet Olive Jensen (Ann Dvorak) and later invites her back to his place for a nightcap. It's all perfectly innocent, of course, but Olive has a tendency to ignore any sign that she's worn out her welcome. And although she seems to have an iron constitution, Olive soon confesses that she's subject to fainting spells -- a fact Arthur ignores as he later believes he's killed her when she succumbs to one of her ''episodes.''

To avoid scandal, Arthur moves the unconscious Olive to the terrace of his neighbor David Galleo (Turhan Bey) and is doubly pleased in doing so because he's been trying to evict the bohemian artist and his vexing dog Rabelais. But David and girlfriend Deborah (Virginia Mayo) are on to his scheme and think up their own plot to ensure that Arthur won't be pushing for dispossession any time soon.

A delightful comedy that echoes the classic screwball farces of the 1930s, Out of the Blue features Carole Landis in one of her final roles (also playing against type as the disapproving Mae) before her tragic passing in 1948, and both Turhan Bey and Virginia Mayo who make an attractive couple as they're swept up in the insanity. But it's Ann Dvorak who steals the show as the delightful Olive... the infuriatingly funny and unstoppable force who turns poor Arthur's world upside down.

Author Vera Caspary, whose works were adapted for such classic films as Laura and A Letter to Three Wives, wrote the story and co-scripted Out of the Blue which was directed by screwball comedy veteran Leigh Jason.

***

If Eagle-Lion's Out of the Blue looks more like a slick Warner Bros. product at times, it's because the film was peopled by former Warners personnel, both in front of and behind the cameras. George Brent and Carole Landis play the Earthleighs, tenants in a roomy Greenwich Village apartment. When Mr. Earthleigh isn't being nagged by his domineering bride, he's enmeshed in a feud with his neighbor, loose-living artist David (Turhan Bey). During his wife's absence, Earthleigh makes the mistake of inviting Olive (Ann Dvorak), a glamorous interior decorator who's somewhat the worse for drink, to his apartment. When Olive passes out on his floor, Earthleigh assumes that she's dead-and in the course of subsequent events, so does everyone else. Adding to the general zaniness is Deborah (Virginia Mayo), one of David's sexier models, who weaves in and out of the proceedings at the most inopportune moments, and a huge, cantankerous canine named Rabelais. Despite some formidable competition, the comedy honors in Out of the Blue are won hands-down by Ann Dvorak, in a truly offbeat performance.

Excerpt from B+N located HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: April 21st, 1947

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Review: Classicflix - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Box Cover

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Distribution Classicflix - Region 'A' - Blu-ray
Runtime 1:25:19.614         
Video

1.33:1 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 24,516,723,259 bytes

Feature: 21,602,912,256 bytes

Video Bitrate: 29.97 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate Blu-ray:

Audio

DTS-HD Master Audio English 1961 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1961 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

Subtitles English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio:
Classicflix

 

1.33:1 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 24,516,723,259 bytes

Feature: 21,602,912,256 bytes

Video Bitrate: 29.97 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:

Trailers


Blu-ray Release Date:
December 10th, 2019
Standard Blu-ray Case

Chapters 21

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Classicflix Blu-ray (December 2019): Classicflix have transferred the 1947 'Screwball' comedy Out of the Blue to Blu-ray. It is on a single-layered disc with a high bitrate. It looks impressive with consistent, fine, grain textures and only a sporadic speckle or two. Contrast is well-layered in 1080P and the image in-motion is extremely pleasing. Looks great.

On their Blu-ray, Classicflix use a DTS-HD Master 2.0 channel mono track (24-bit) in the original English language. The film's audio is clean and although the score is credited to Carmen Dragon (Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Cover Girl) the notable song is the theme 'Out of the Blue' soulfully rendered (and uncredited) to Hadda Brooks who performs it on the piano in a nightclub and is later heard on a phonograph. It is almost out-of-place in this screwball comedy with its beautiful melancholy overtones. Gorgeous. Classicflix offer optional English subtitles on their Region 'A' Blu-ray.

The Classicflix Blu-ray has nothing but a handful of trailers for their own similar genre output.

This is really fun. Out of the Blue seems to wander in its attempts at appealing to an audience with some cheesecake flirtatious sexuality from the gals; Mayo and Dvorak (and not enough of it from Carol Landis), the unfitting, but heart-rendering, theme song performance and I can't help but think modern feminists would not approve of some of the concluding circumstances (Mayo slaps Landis and the husband states that he 'should have done it sooner' - and Landis' powerful female character is usurped into becoming a doting housewife). But yes, a time gone by, and a well-executed 'gag' comedy often carrying Screwball pacing. It's a film I am happy to have seen and the Classicflix Blu-ray provides an excellent presentation.

Gary Tooze

 


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Distribution Classicflix - Region 'A' - Blu-ray


 


 

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