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Vincent Price Six Gothic Tales [Blu-ray]

 

The Fall of House of Usher a.k.a House of Usher (1960)         The Pit and the Pendulum (1961)


   Tales of Terror (1962)                         The Raven (1964)


The Haunted Palace (1963)                                          Tomb of Legeia (1964)

 

 

From the Merchant of Menace, Vincent Price, and the King of the Bs, Roger Corman, come six Gothic tales inspired by the pen of Edgar Allan Poe.

In The Fall of the House of Usher, a young man learns of a family curse that threatens his happiness with his bride-to-be. In The Pit and the Pendulum, a brother investigates the untimely death of sister, played by Barbara Steele. Tales of Terror adapts three Poe classics, Morella, The Black Cat and The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, each starring a horror icon. The Raven is a comic take on the famous poem concerning three rival magicians. In The Haunted Palace, a newcomer in a New England town is suspected of being a warlock. And in The Tomb of Ligeia, filmed in Norfolk and at Stonehenge, a widower s upcoming marriage plans are thwarted by his dead first wife.

The six films boast a remarkable cast list: not just Price and Steele, but also Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre, Lon Chaney Jr, Basil and a very young Jack Nicholson. Adapted for the screen by Richard Matheson and Robert Towne, these Six Gothic Tales now rank as classic examples of sixties horror cinema.

 

Box Cover

   

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Distribution

Arrow Video - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Subtitles

English (SDH), None

Features

Release Information:
Studio: Arrow

Edition Details:


FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER
• Audio commentary with director and producer Roger Corman
• Interview with director and former Corman apprentice Joe Dante (26:47)
• Fragments of The House of Usher: a specially-commissioned video essay by critic and filmmaker David Cairns examining Corman's film in relation to Poe's story (10:47)
• Jonathan Rigby (32:59)
• Archival interview with Vincent Price (11:46)
• Original Trailer (2:30)
• Collector's booklet featuring new writing on the film by author and critic Tim Lucas and an extract from Vincent Price s long out of print autobiography, illustrated with original archive stills and posters

 

THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM
• Optional Isolated Music and Effects Track
• Audio commentary with director and producer Roger Corman
• Audio commentary by critic Tim Lucas
• Behind the Swinging Blade – A new documentary on the making of The Pit and the Pendulum featuring Roger Corman, star Barbara Steele, Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price and more! (43:07)
• Added TV Sequence – Shot in 1968 to pad out the film for the longer TV time slot, this scene features star Luana Anders (5:04)
• An Evening of Edgar Allan Poe with Vincent Price [52 mins] – Price reads a selection of Poe’s classic stories before a live audience, including The Tell-Tale Heart, The Sphinx, The Cask of Amontillado and The Pit and the Pendulum (with optional English SDH) (53:07)
• Original Trailer (2:30)
• Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Gothic Horror author Jonathan Rigby, illustrated with original archive stills and posters

TALES OF TERROR
• The Directors: Roger Corman (58:32) - An hour-long documentary on Roger Corman featuring contributions from James Cameron, Martin Scorsese and Ron Howard
• Kim Newman on Edgar Allan Poe (29:33)

Critic and novelist Anne Billson discusses the contributions of our feline friends to genre cinema - Cats in Horror Films (9:12)
• The Black Cat, a 1993 short film adaptation of Poe s classic tale directed by Rob Green (The Bunker) (18:21)

• Theatrical Trailer (2:22)

 

THE RAVEN
• Peter Lorre: The Double Face, Harun Farocki s 1984 documentary, subtitled in English for the first time (1:01:21)
• An interview with the legendary novelist and screenwriter Richard Matheson (6:35)
• An interview with Roger Corman about making The Raven and the comedy in the film (8:11)
• The Trick, a short film about rival magicians by Rob Green (The Bunker) (12;19)
• Promotional Record (5:41)
• Stills and Poster Gallery

• Theatrical Trailer (2:27)

THE HAUNTED PALACE
• Audio commentary by Vincent Price s biographer David Del Valle and Derek Botelho
• Kim Newman on H.P. Lovecraft (27:59)
• An interview with Roger Corman - A Change of Poe (11:18)
• Stills and Poster Gallery

• Theatrical Trailer (2:14)

THE TOMB OF LIGEIA
• Audio commentary by director and producer Roger Corman
• Audio commentary by star Elizabeth Shepherd
• All-new interviews with cast and crew:

- Uncredited assistant to producer, and co-screenwriter Paul Mayersberg (24:25)
- Assistant director David Tringham (8:15)
- Clapper Loader Bob Jordan (7:41)
- Composer Kenneth V. Jones (6:19)

• Theatrical Trailer (2:31)

• 200-PAGE BOOK LIMITED EDITION EXCLUSIVE
Collector s book containing new writing the films, an interview with Roger Corman, extracts from Vincent Price s autobiography and full reproductions of tie-in comic books for Tales of Terror, The Raven and The Tomb of Ligea


Blu-ray Release Date: December 8th, 2014

 

Comments:

NOTE: These Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

Firstly, the 6 films - The Fall of House of Usher (1960), The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), Tales of Terror (1962), The Raven (1964), The Haunted Palace (1963) and The Tomb of Legeia (1964) - are on 6 separate, dual-layered Blu-ray discs (unlike Shout! Factory who, often, share 2 features per disc as in their Vincent Price Blu-ray Collection Vol 1 - The Fall of House of Usher, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Haunted Palace, The Masque of the Red Death, Witchfinder General, The Abominable Dr. Phibes - and Volume 2 -The House on Haunted Hill, The Return of the Fly, The Comedy of Terrors, The Raven, The Last Man on Earth, Tomb of Ligeia and Dr. Phibes Rises Again.)

I've included some captures and the comments, below, from the two previously compared features (The Fall of House of Usher, The Pit and the Pendulum) that are now part of this Arrow Collection - as they are the same transfers and same supplements as Arrow's previously released individual Blu-ray packages. I've also compared The Haunted Palace - German Koch Media + Shout! Factory Blu-rays vs. the new Arrow 1080P.

All six Arrow Blu-rays are in-and-around the original 2.35:1 and have optional English (SDH) subtitles and offer Isolated scores except The Fall of The House of Usher, which does not. All offer uncompressed soundtracks - with linear PCM mono tracks at 1152 kbps on each excepting The Fall of The House of Usher  which has a, similarly robust, DTS-HD Master. All have original theatrical trailers.

Video: I'm very pleased as all seem to have max'ed out bitrates getting the most out of the source elements. Tales of Terror and Tomb of Legeia (which shows some Cinemascope 'mumps' horizontal stretching) have a couple of less consistent rougher patches (visible surface scratches) but they are brief and, in no way, impinged on my viewing. All three that are compared are the best of their, respective, issues - generally appearing slightly smoother in-motion, sometimes minutely darker, than their US or German counterpart(s). Ex. the Shout! Factory Usher is not up to the robust Arrow transfer found in this Six Gothic Tales set. The UK is lighter, skin -tones a shade cooler and the US image is slightly noisier. Blacks levels are deep and contrast layered. Overall though it is quite watchable. NOTE: The Shout! Factory release is three minutes+ longer as it has the Overture starting the presentation. The Pit and the Pendulum has a lot of parity with the Region 'A' as does The Haunted Palace although the Arrow is a notch superior in-motion. It has the same marks and light scratches. I feel confident that these are the best we are likely to get for home theatre presentation with no fatal anomalies to hinder the enjoyment. Colors are impressively rich.

On The Fall of the House of Usher Arrow add some great supplements. We get the audio commentary with director and producer Roger Corman - that I first heard on MGM's Midnite Movies DVD from 2001. He comes across as friendly, charismatic and points out some interesting tidbits from the production. We get a 27-minute interview with director and former Corman apprentice Joe Dante who extols the low-budget B movies filmmaker and adds an anecdote or two. Fragments of The House of Usher is a specially-commissioned video essay by critic and filmmaker David Cairns examining Corman's film in relation to Poe's story. It runs about 11-minutes to specific scenes of the film. Jonathan Rigby (author of American Gothic: Sixty Years of Horror Cinema) discusses the film, AIP's involvement and Corman for an additional 1/2 hour. He is quite excellent and brimming with knowledge. We get a 12-minute archival interview with Vincent Price with burned in French subtitles and an original trailer.

Arrow's Pit and the Pendulum offer a ton of extras. We get the same commentary with Roger Corman as found on the Shout! Factory as well as a second, very professional commentary from critic Tim Lucas. He is, easily, the best for this genre and imparts some valuable information that fans will be keen to indulge in. There is also a third, optional track with the isolated music and effects. Behind the Swinging Blade is a 2013, 43-minute documentary on the making of The Pit and the Pendulum featuring Roger Corman, star Barbara Steele, Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price and others discussing the production. We get a 5-minute added TV Sequence – shot in 1968 to pad out the film for the longer TV time slot. This particular scene features star Luana Anders. An Evening of Edgar Allan Poe with Vincent Price is a 53-minute, TV-quality, show from 1970. In it, Price reads a selection of Poe’s classic stories before a live audience, including The Tell-Tale Heart, The Sphinx, The Cask of Amontillado and The Pit and the Pendulum. It offers English subtitles - the a/v is not very strong although it is transferred in 1080P

On Tales of Terror, Arrow include an hour-long documentary, entitled The Directors: Roger Corman, on Corman featuring contributions from James Cameron, Jonathan Demme, Martin Scorsese and Ron Howard plus included is a new 1/2 hour piece with Kim Newman discussing Edgar Allan Poe and some of the key cinema adaptations of his work. Critic and novelist Anne Billson discusses the contributions of cat to genre cinema in a 10-minute video appropriately titled Cats in Horror Films. We also get The Black Cat, an 18-minute 1993 short film adaptation of Poe's classic tale directed by Rob Green (The Bunker).

The Raven also has substantial supplements including an hour-long German documentary - Peter Lorre: The Double Face. It was made by Harun Farocki in 1984 and subtitled in English and is a competent examination of the actors entire career, from Lorre's early days in the theatre with Bertholt Brecht to his untimely death in 1964. There is a 61/2 minute interview with the legendary novelist and screenwriter Richard Matheson and an 8-minute interview with Roger Corman about making The Raven and the comedy found in the film. The Trick is another a short film by Rob Green. This is about rival magicians and runs just over a dozen minutes. There is an audio-only reading for 6-minutes promoting the film, a stills and poster gallery and a trailer.

The Haunted Palace has an audio commentary by Vincent Price's biographer David Del Valle coupled with replacement Derek Botelho and another excellent Kim Newman piece - this one on on H.P. Lovecraft and runs 1/2 hour. We get another vintage interview with Roger Corman entitled A Change of Poe running over 10-minutes and the obligator stills and poster gallery as well as a theatrical trailer.

The Tomb of Legeia has not one, but 2, informative, audio commentaries. The first is by director and producer Roger Corman and the second by star Elizabeth Shepherd. There are 4, all new, interviews with cast and crew - as follows; 25-minutes with uncredited assistant to producer, and co-screenwriter Paul Mayersberg, 8-minutes with assistant director David Tringham, another 8-minutes with Clapper Loader Bob Jordan and 6-minutes with composer Kenneth V. Jones. There is also a theatrical trailer.

This incredible package also contains a 200-page book as a limited edition exclusive (2,000 copies). It is a collector's book containing new writing the films, an interview with Roger Corman, extracts from Vincent Price s autobiography and full reproductions of tie-in comic books for Tales of Terror, The Raven and The Tomb of Ligeia.

Easily the definitive capsule for Corman, Poe, Price fans - a set that never stops giving in the form of extensive and educational supplements. One of the most complete Blu-ray collections of the entire year! Our highest recommendation! 

Gary W. Tooze

 

 


 

 

The first of Roger Corman's Edgar Allan Poe films, Fall of the House of Usher was originally released as simply House of Usher. Vincent Price stars as the foredoomed Roderick Usher. Living in his decaying family mansion with his young sister Madeline (Myrna Fahey), Roderick does his best to shoo away Madeline's fiancÚ Philip Winthrop (Mark Damon). He tells the young swain that Madeline suffers from the family curse of encroaching madness, and thus cannot be permitted to bear children. After a series of suspicious, near-fatal accidents, Phillip insists that Madeline be allowed to leave with him at once. But Roderick sadly announces that this is impossible: Madeline has died, and is slated to be entombed. Informed by the family butler that Madeline has previously been prone to near-catatonic spells, Phillip angrily insists that the girl may very well have been buried alive. The climactic conflagration would be recycled as stock footage in future Corman/Poe efforts, as would the set representing the Usher home.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

 

Arrow - Individually:

 

 

Also available in a limited edition steelbook:

 

Comments:

The Fall of the House of Usher gets an impressive transfer to Blu-ray from Arrow Films. There is softness here but it seems totally in-line with the production not the max'ed dual-layered transfer with high bitrate. The DVD has similar and the visuals will probably never be pristine or crisp. There is some grain, a bit clunky at times, but colors (notable crimson, reds) are very rich and impressive. The 1080P supports solid contrast exhibiting healthy, rich black levels and some minor, infrequent, depth in the 2.35:1 frame. It's really clean and makes some of the limited effects a bit transparent. This only adds to the flavor, IMO. This Blu-ray provides a wonderful presentation in a pitch-black home theater room. Thumbs up!

 

Audio comes via a linear PCM 2.0 channel at 1536 kbps. Effects come through well - adding responsively. The 'gothic' atmospheric score is by Les Baxter (notable for the salaciously titled US version of Summer with Monika aka Monika, the Story of a Bad Girl, The Young Racers and other Corman, or Corman-esque pulpy 'B' films). Audio is essentially subtle with some dramatic surprises - benefitting from the lossless. There are optional English (SDH) subtitles and my Oppo has identified it as being a region 'B'-locked.

 

Arrow add some great supplements. We get the audio commentary with director and producer Roger Corman - that I first heard on MGM's Midnite Movies DVD from 2001. He comes across as friendly, charismatic and points out some interesting tidbits from the production. We get a 27-minute interview with director and former Corman apprentice Joe Dante who extols the low-budget B movies filmmaker and adds an anecdote or two. Fragments of The House of Usher is a specially-commissioned video essay by critic and filmmaker David Cairns examining Corman's film in relation to Poe's story. It runs about 11-minutes to specific scenes of the film. Jonathan Rigby (author of American Gothic: Sixty Years of Horror Cinema) discusses the film, AIP's involvement and Corman for an additional 1/2 hour. He is quite excellent and brimming with knowledge. We get a 12-minute archival interview with Vincent Price with burned in French subtitles and an original trailer. The package contains a collector's booklet featuring new writing on the film by author and critic Tim Lucas and an extract from Vincent Price s long out of print autobiography, illustrated with original archive stills and posters.

 

The Fall of the House of Usher has some of the best atmosphere in horror. The decaying house is one of the characters and the iconic Corman created a real gem. The trifecta of Poe/Corman and a Richard Matheson screenplay is rich and juicy for the genre film buff. This is a film you can revisit your entire life. The Arrow Blu-ray provides excellent a/v and wonderful supplements. The 1080P presentation is a memorable one and this Blu-ray is strongly recommended!

 

1) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

Bitrates:                                                                                                                    

 

  Arrow Video Shout! Factory

Runtime:

1:19:08.744

1:22:23.980 (includes 3-minute Overture!)

Disc Size:

48,697,205,908 bytes

46,989,531,688 bytes

Feature Size:

23,974,969,344 bytes

19,524,784,128 bytes

Video Bitrate:

34.99 Mbps

24.00 Mbps

Chapters:

12

12

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit
Commentary: LPCM Audio English 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit

DTS-HD Master Audio English 1958 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1958 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio English 1561 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1561 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio English 1963 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1963 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

1) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

 


 

 

directed by Roger Corman

1961, USA

 

 

American-International's standing "haunted castle" set is exhibited to peak advantage in Roger Corman's Pit and the Pendulum. Save for the climax, Richard Matheson's script bears but little resemblance to the Edgar Allen Poe original, though there are pronounced echoes throughout of Poe's The Premature Burial. Vincent Price stars as Nicholas Medina, the son of a notorious Spanish Inquisition torturer. Nicholas' wife Elizabeth (Barbara Steele) has died under mysterious circumstances, prompting Elizabeth's brother Francis (John Kerr) to arrive at the Medina castle to investigate. The tormented Medina believes that Elizabeth was buried alive, and is convinced that he can hear his wife's voice calling out to him. In truth, Elizabeth has faked her death, part of a plan concocted with her lover Dr. Leon (Anthony Carbone) to drive Medina mad. She succeeds in this goal (albeit to her own grief, as the film's very last shot reveals), pushing Medina over the brink. Convinced that he's his own father, Medina dons Inquisition robes, straps Francis to a table, and arranges for a huge steel-bladed pendulum to slowly, slooooowwly descend on his helpless victim. You'd never know that Pit and The Pendulum was shot on the budget and schedule of a B western; the film is consistently good to look at, with eerily evocative color camerawork (Floyd Crosby) and sumptuous art direction. Stock footage of the climactic torture sequence would later find its way into the 1966 spy spoof Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine, which also starred Vincent Price.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Theatrical Release: August 12th, 1961

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Comparison: 

Shout! Factory (The Vincent Price Collection) - Region 'A' - Blu-ray vs. Arrow (+ Steelbook) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray LEFT

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray RIGHT

 

Box Covers

 

 

 

Also available in a regular Blu-ray Edition with the exact same transfer:

Distribution

Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Subtitles

English, None

English (SDH), None

Features

Release Information:
Studio: Shout! Factory

THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM

• Vintage and rare Introduction and final words from Vincent Price (5:06)
• Audio Commentary with Roger Corman
• Theatrical Trailer (2:28)
• Still Gallery

Blu-ray Release Date: October 22nd, 2013

Release Information:
Studio: Arrow

THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM

• Optional Isolated Music and Effects Track
• Audio commentary with director and producer Roger Corman
• Audio commentary by critic Tim Lucas
• Behind the Swinging Blade – A new documentary on the making of The Pit and the Pendulum featuring Roger Corman, star Barbara Steele, Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price and more! (43:07)
• Added TV Sequence – Shot in 1968 to pad out the film for the longer TV time slot, this scene features star Luana Anders (5:04)
• An Evening of Edgar Allan Poe with Vincent Price [52 mins] – Price reads a selection of Poe’s classic stories before a live audience, including The Tell-Tale Heart, The Sphinx, The Cask of Amontillado and The Pit and the Pendulum (with optional English SDH) (53:07)
• Original Trailer (2:30)
• 
Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Gothic Horror author Jonathan Rigby, illustrated with original archive stills and posters

Blu-ray Release Date: May 19th, 2014

 

Comments:

NOTE: These Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

Firstly, in the 4 Blu-ray discs, 6-film, Vincent Price Collection (reviewed HERE) The Pit and the Pendulum shares the first Blu-ray with The Masque of the Red Death. Arrow have released a new Blu-ray package - in both a regular transparent case version and a Steelbook (both UK transfers are the same). It is now available as part of Arrow's Vincent Price - Six Gothic Tales Boxset - and it is the same transfer discussed below.

The Pit and the Pendulum gets a more robust transfer via Arrow with a much higher bitrate than the US edition. The images look very similar in the static captures comparisons below (color, detail) but, in-motion, the Arrow is smoother and superior. Textures are supported - there is a bit of frame-specific damage but otherwise contrast supports an excellent 1080P image.

Audio: Arrow use a linear PCM mono track, faithfully replicating the original production audio. It sounds predictably flat with a shade of noticeable depth. Like the Shout! Factory the Arrow offers optional English subtitles but is a region 'B'-locked Blu-ray.

Arrow offer a ton of extras. We get the same commentary with Roger Corman as found on the Shout! Factory as well as a second, very professional commentary from critic Tim Lucas. He is, easily, the best for this genre and imparts some valuable information that fans will be keen to indulge in. There is also a third, optional track with the isolated music and effects. Behind the Swinging Blade is a 2013, 43-minute documentary on the making of The Pit and the Pendulum featuring Roger Corman, star Barbara Steele, Vincent Price’s daughter Victoria Price and others discussing the production. We get a 5-minute added TV Sequence – shot in 1968 to pad out the film for the longer TV time slot. This particular scene features star Luana Anders. An Evening of Edgar Allan Poe with Vincent Price is a 53-minute, TV-quality, show from 1970. In it, Price reads a selection of Poe’s classic stories before a live audience, including The Tell-Tale Heart, The Sphinx, The Cask of Amontillado and The Pit and the Pendulum. It offers English subtitles - the a/v is not very strong although it is transferred in 1080P. Included is an original trailer and the package contains a collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Gothic Horror author Jonathan Rigby, illustrated with original archive stills and posters.

Once again, Arrow produce the definitive Blu-ray package for a pseudo-classic. It's an incredible package - max'ed out a/v - and some real effort going into the extras. Plus a Steelbook case (which is marvelous, btw) if you desire. This is a perfect film, for a late Friday night double-feature (suggest The Fall of the House of Usher!) Heartily endorsed!

Gary W. Tooze

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

Bitrate

Shout!

Factory:

Bitrate

Arrow:

  Shout! Factory Arrow Video

Runtime:

1:20:33.995

1:20:32.577

Disc Size:

45,371,255,959 bytes

41,393,854,526 bytes

Feature Size:

18,189,023,232 bytes

25,293,739,584 bytes

Video Bitrate:

24.00 Mbps

34.86 Mbps

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio English 2060 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2060 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Commentary:

DTS-HD Master Audio English 2140 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2140 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Dolby Digital Audio Commentary:

English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
Dolby Digital Audio Commentary:

English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
LPCM Audio Undetermined 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit

 


Sample Menus

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray LEFT

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray RIGHT


 
 

 


CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 


 

 

Roger Corman 1962

 

Roger Corman's Tales of Terror stars Vincent Price in a trio of short stories, liberally adapted by Richard Matheson from the works of Edgar Allan Poe. The film gets off to a rousing start with "Morella," in which Price's bitterness over the long-ago death of his wife results in tragedy for his estranged daughter Maggie Pierce. The last of the three terror-filled tales, "The Case of Mr. Valdemar," finds Price being put into a state of suspended animation by the diabolical Basil Rathbone; when Rathbone claims Price's bride Debra Paget for himself, Price briefly revives, only to melt before our eyes (this horrific image was reproduced on the film's advertising posters). The film's best story is its centerpiece, "The Black Cat," which weaves elements of "The Cask of Amontillado" into a mordantly funny revenge tale concerning Price, his bitter enemy Peter Lorre, and Lorre's two-timing wife Joyce Jameson. This is the one in which a besotted Lorre walls up Price and Jameson in his cellar, then endures a hellish hallucination of Vincent and Joyce playing a football game with his head! A mixed bag, to be sure, but Tales of Terror remains one of the best of Corman's Poe cycle (though it does lose a lot when not shown in its original Cinemascope form.)

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

 

Bitrate:

Runtime:

1:28:40.023

Disc Size:

46,017,194,010 bytes

Feature Size:

27,615,665,088 bytes

Video Bitrate:

34.97 Mbps

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Isolated Score: LPCM Audio Undetermined 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 
 
 

Menus


 

 

Roger Corman 1963

 

Although Roger Corman narrowly managed to avoid self-mockery in his pulpy, flamboyant adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe tales, it appears that the director chose this opportunity to let loose with outright parody; the result is a wonderfully entertaining romp with tongue planted firmly in cheek. The first screen teaming of legendary horror stars Boris Karloff, Vincent Price, and Peter Lorre -- later billed as "The Triumvirate of Terror" -- this so-called "adaptation" uses Poe's most famous poem as a springboard for Grand Guignol comedy from scriptwriter Richard Matheson. Melancholy magician Erasmus Craven (Price), having recently relinquished his membership in the Brotherhood of Sorcerers after the apparent death of his wife Lenore (Hazel Court), is paid a visit by a foul-mouthed talking raven, claiming to be small-time wizard Adolphus Bedlo (Lorre). After some persuasion, Craven returns Bedlo to human form, reversing a spell placed by the evil Dr. Scarabus (Karloff), Craven's chief rival. After learning that a woman bearing a strong likeness to Lenore was seen in the Doctor's company, Craven accompanies Bedlo to Scarabus' castle, where the resulting battle of wills escalates into all-out magical warfare between the two embittered sorcerers. Corman and company relished the opportunity to poke fun at the staid Poe series, and the distinguished leads contribute to the spirit of fun by lampooning their own cinematic reputations. Fans of Jack Nicholson (who cut his acting teeth on this and other AIP productions) should enjoy his melodramatic performance here as Bedlo's straight-arrow son; Nicholson would later co-star with Karloff in Corman's The Terror, which was shot in two days using the same sets.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

 

Bitrate:

Runtime:

1:26:06.202

Disc Size:

42,851,881,669 bytes

Feature Size:

26,812,681,152 bytes

Video Bitrate:

34.96 Mbps

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Isolated Score: LPCM Audio Undetermined 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit

 

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The Haunted Palace is a witches' brew of stories written by Edgar Allan Poe and H. P. Lovecraft--with the fine hand of sinister scenarist Charles Beaumont stirring the pot. Vincent Price plays two roles this time: A New England doctor burned as a sorcerer in 1745, and the dead man's great-grandson of 1855. Arriving in the village where his grandfather was killed, Price and his bride Debra Paget are shunned by the community. They are told that the mutant progeny of the "sorcerer"'s evil experiments are still roaming the countryside--with hulking manservant Lon Chaney Jr. a good example of these monstrosities. The longer he stays in the family mansion, the more Price is taken over by the spirit of his ancestor. The result: The possessed Price, together with Chaney and a warlock assistant, set about to create a mutant race to overtake the world. Concluding with the near-sacrifice of bride Debra Paget and the torching of the mansion, The Haunted Palace is a marvelous--and economically produced--exercise in Grand Guignol.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Arrow Bitrate:

  Koch Media (Germany) Shout! Factory Arrow

Runtime:

1:27:06.304

1:27:09.265 1:27:08.223

Disc Size:

15,427,391,428 bytes

46,989,531,688 bytes 33,732,495,215 bytes

Feature Size:

15,152,910,336 bytes

21,035,747,328 bytes 27,276,696,960 bytes

Video Bitrate:

19.99 Mbps

24.00 Mbps 34.96 Mbps

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio German 1002 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1002 kbps / 16-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 768 kbps / 16-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio English 906 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 906 kbps / 16-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 768 kbps / 16-bit)

DTS-HD Master Audio English 2041 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2041 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio English 2034 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2034 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio English 2031 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2031 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Isolated Score:

LPCM Audio Undetermined 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Commentary:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

 

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Subtitle sample - Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 

 

1) Koch (Germany) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray MIDDLE

3) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Koch (Germany) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray MIDDLE

3) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Koch (Germany) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray MIDDLE

3) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Koch (Germany) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray MIDDLE

3) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

1) Koch (Germany) - Region 'B' - Blu-ray TOP

2) Shout! Factory - Region 'A' - Blu-ray MIDDLE

3) Arrow - Region 'B' - Blu-ray BOTTOM

 

 

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Roger Corman 1964

 

Once again Vincent Price stars for director Roger Corman in The Tomb of Ligeia, the last of Corman's eight Edgar Allen Poe adaptations, a film graced by a script by Robert Towne and moody cinematography by Nicolas Roeg. Price has the creepy lead role of Verden Fell. In 1821, when Verden's wife Ligeia (Elizabeth Shepherd) dies, she is buried in a churchyard, despite the parson's objections that she can't be buried there since she isn't a Christian. Before the grave is closed, abetted by the screech of a black cat, Ligeia eyes shoot open, startling Verden, who becomes convinced that she is not dead. Months later, Lady Rowena (also played by Shepherd) is thrown from her horse and lands at the foot of Ligeia's grave. Verden tends to her and soon falls in love with her. They marry and move into Verden's gloomy Gothic abbey, where Rowena begins to have strange dreams involving Ligeia and a black cat. One night she awakens to discover a dead fox in her bed. When Ligeia's grave is exhumed, instead of Ligeia's corpse, a wax figure is discovered. Then Rowena finds, to her horror, Verden in the arms of his dead wife in a hidden room of the abbey. Having hypnotized Verden before she died, Ligeia had Verden convinced she will live forever. Verden, now possessed by the spirit of his dead wife, takes a torch to the abbey, trapping himself and Rowena in the flaming conflagration. But Christopher (John Westbrook), an admirer of Rowena, endeavors to rescue Rowena from the flames.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Box Cover

   

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Distribution

Arrow Video - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 

 

Bitrate:

Runtime:

1:21:42.272

Disc Size:

32,757,727,952 bytes

Feature Size:

25,735,760,832 bytes

Video Bitrate:

34.96 Mbps

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit
Isolated Score: LPCM Audio Undetermined 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit

Commentaries:

Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps
Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps

 

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Box Cover

   

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Distribution

Arrow Video - Region 'B' - Blu-ray



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