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directed by David DeCoteau
USA 1987

 

By 1998 (remember this is a 1987 film), the world powers have engaged in nuclear war leaving most of the surface of the earth uninhabitable due to mutant nomads and acid rain (neither of which we actually see). A quintet of army deserters - natural leader Jake (Richard Hawkins, FAMILY REUNION), blowhard Butch (actor-turned-reality TV editor Ken Abraham, TERROR NIGHT), smart Kate (Ashlyn Gere, EVIL LAUGH), sexy Bianca (Linnea Quigley, RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD), and nerdy Jesse (Michael Aranda, EL CHUPACABRA) - stumble upon an abandoned bunker while seeking shelter from a coming acid rain storm (signified throughout by stormy stock footage riddled wlvith white speckles). They quickly discover that the bunker was being used for an experiment invoing self-reproducible amino acids and that the people working on it didn't so much flee as die horribly. After Jesse dies in a gooey manner, the others worry that they have been infected; however, a hulking insectoid mutant could get to them first (well, that or the mutant rats).

Despite the post-apocalyptic setting, sober tone, and better effects, David DeCoteau's CREEPOZOIDS is otherwise very similar to his SORORITY BABES IN THE SLIMEBALL BOWL-O-RAMA (released the following year by Charles Band's Empire Pictures' offshoot Urban Classics) with its small cast running around dark corridors and getting picked off by monsters. In some ways, the film feels more like an Italian post-apocalyptic picture (possibly due to Thomas Calloway's gel-lighting and Hawkins' lead performance which at times sounds awkwardly-dubbed) yet it's never sufficiently outrageous suggesting that all involved were playing it safe. The bulk of the running time is an efficient time-waster with a bit of T&A (adult actress Gere keeps her clothes on, but the always dependable Quigley doffs her clothes for a shower sex scene and Abraham also strips down for DeCoteau's fans), some gooey deaths (although it appears that the filmmakers wanted to stay on this side of an R-rating with blood that is usually more black than red and limbs stay connected despite the creature's claws and pinchers); however, the finale is a bit frustrating since it has some nice tense bits with the monster's genuinely creepy offspring; but the sequence is dragged on way too long (the hero does more screaming than the two female characters combined and you'll soon be rooting for the monster).

Eric Cotenas

Posters

Theatrical Release: 2 October 1987 (USA)

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DVD Comparison:

Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL

Big thanks to Eric Cotenas for all the Screen Caps!

(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - LEFT vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

 

 

 

 

Distribution

Shadow Entertainment

Region 0 - NTSC

88 Films
Region 0 - PAL
Runtime 1:11:51 1:08:54 (4% PAL speedup)
Video

1.33:1 Open Matte format
Average Bitrate: 4.69 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.33:1 Open Matte format
Average Bitrate: 5.3 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Shadow Entertainment

 

Bitrate:

 

88 Films

 

Audio English Dolby Digital 2.0 mono

English Dolby Digital 2.0 mono

Subtitles none none
Features Release Information:
Studio: Shadow Entertainment

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Trailers for BACKLASH: OBLIVION 2, MURDERCYCLE, VAMPIRE RESURRECTION, DELTA DELTA DIE, DARKWALKER, and BIRTHRITE

DVD Release Date: 9 December 2003
Amaray

Chapters 14
 

Release Information:
Studio: 88 Films

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Bonus feature film FILMGORE (4:3; 1:59:12) - see below
• Theatrical Trailer (4:3; 1:50)
• Still Galllery
• Trailers for SORORITY BABES IN THE SLIMEBALL BOWL-O-RAMA, PUPPET MASTER, DR. ALIEN, PUPPET MASTER II
• TOURIST TRAP, ZOMBIES VS. STRIPPERS, THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM, PUPPET MASTER III, CASTLE FREAK, and
• CANNIBAL WOMEN IN THE AVOCADO JUNGLE OF DEATH

 

DVD Release Date: January 14th, 2013
Amaray

Chapters 8

 

Comments

Although apparently sourced from a PAL master of the same age as the distractingly-interlaced 2001 US release (possibly the same one for the now out-of-print 2004 Screen Entertainment [HERE] release), the 88 Films release sports better encoding and compression. The UK release also seems to be hair brighter, with slightly less saturated reds unfortunately; but it is definitely the better video presentation. The Dolby Digital mono audio is of similar quality for the most part. In terms of extras, the UK release is superior with its inclusion of the original trailer (with a nice tagline) and the unrelated bonus feature-length compilation FILMGORE (see below). The UK release also features a nicer cover and superior menus.

There does exist a German DVD release which not only includes an interview with actress Linnea Quigley, but also reportedly the film's script in English.

 - Eric Cotenas

 


DVD Menus
(
Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - LEFT vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - RIGHT)


 

 
 

 


 

Screen Captures

(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 

 


(Shadow Entertainment - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


 

directed by Ken Dixon
USA 1983

 

In the early eighties, producer Charles Band (not yet of Empire Pictures and later Full Moon Entertainment) got into the video distribution business with a trio of related labels (Wizard Video, Force Video, and Cult Video) and hired Ken Dixon (THE EROTIC ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE) to direct a trio of compilation videos showcasing several of the titles on those labels. THE BEST OF SEX & VIOLENCE (1981) was a horror/erotica combo while FAMOUS T&A (1982) focused on the latter. FILMGORE (1983) is a two-hour compilation of viewer's digest of Wizard, Force, and Cult's gorier horror titles with wrap-around quips by Elvira, Mistress of the Dark (Dixon's later, even more dire ZOMBIETHON focused solely on Wizard's zombie film output including many of the Eurocine titles).

First up is Herschell Gordon Lewis' BLOOD FEAST (released by Wizard Video and later Continental Video, who excerpted it for their own gore compilation TERROR ON TAPE), and every gory highlight is presented here in a twenty minute condensation that may obviate the need to actually see the full film for most people (all the good lines - and headlines! - are present, as is the ending). The highlights of TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (released by Wizard a few years before the easier-to-find Media Home Entertainment VHS) are covered in roughly fifteen minutes, although the film is intense without graphic gore (whoever edited the clip took care to include the makeshift dolly shots as the characters approach the house of doom), and THE DRILLER KILLER (first released by Wizard and then later by Magnum Entertainment) is summed up in about ten minutes.

Cult Video's DRIVE-IN MASSACRE's goriest murder was already sampled in the compilation's interminable eight minute pre-title sequence but it's there again along with the other confusingly-edited kills in less than five minutes. Ted V. Mikel's THE ASTRO ZOMBIES (released by Wizard) is dull, dull, dull; yet there are apparently fifteen minutes of exciting bits. Seven minutes of Cult Video's CARNIVAL OF BLOOD intercuts its cheap, gory murders of nagging women with snippets of the film's dreary love story (and its accompanying love them) and relies on Elvira more than expository dialogue bits to give a sense of the storyline and characters.

Five minutes of DR. JEKYLL'S DUNGEON OF DEATH (first out from Wizard and then later from Magnum) looks by turns terrible and intriguing, while eight minutes of Don Dohler's THE FIEND (intended for television sales but debuting on Force Video and then later from Prism Entertainment) is seven minutes too many. There's a bit more of interest in Herschell Gordon Lewis' TWO THOUSAND MANIACS (released first by Force Video and then by Continental) than the seven minutes of gore on view here (but not much more, although they could at least have included the theme song in its entirety); however, not even the thirteen final minutes of FILMGORE can coherently convey the mishmash of a story that is Cult Video's SNUFF (an Argentinian film about a Mansonesque cult redubbed by sleaze filmmakers Michael and Roberta Findlay), but its climax (shot by the Findlay's to justify the title) provides the perfect ending shot for the entire compilation. FILMGORE's main point of interest is mainly nostalgia over the video presentations in which we first saw some of these titles (most which have since become available in superior digital presentations).

Eric Cotenas

Poster

Reviews        More Reviews       DVD Reviews

DVD Review: 88 Films - Region 0 - PAL

Big thanks to Eric Cotenas for the Review!

Distribution

88 Films

Region 0 - PAL

Runtime 1:59:12
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.26 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio English Dolby Digital 2.0 mono
Subtitles none
Features Release Information:
Studio: 88 Films

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• (see above)

DVD Release Date:
Amaray

Chapters 10

 

Comments

As mentioned above, a compilation of scenes from releases on three related video labels, the quality is of course uneven as they are all sourced from the same soft and dark video masters used to strike the rental tapes of the individual films. The wrap-around footage is in similarly soft and dark condition (shot on the cheap in the early eighties). The NTSC presentation was already interlaced and the conversion to PAL hasn't done it any favors (the image also softened further by upscaling the image to the higher PAL resolution). Audio also varies based on the sources. One really can't complain since it's an bonus feature, but

  - Eric Cotenas

 


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


 

Report Card:

 

Image:

88 Films

Sound:

Draw

Extras: 88 Films
Menu: 88 Films

 
DVD Box Covers

 

 

 

Distribution

Shadow Entertainment

Region 0 - NTSC

88 Films
Region 0 - PAL

 




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