(aka "the Son")

 

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/dardenne.htm
Belgium 2002

 

It was with great anticipation that I prepared my viewing of "The Son" in my Home Theatre. I had considered the Dardenne Brothers two previous efforts as masterpieces of modern cinema. I soon settled into a cerebral mindset with my infant son playing on the floor at my feet. The film started, ran and floated to its eventual conclusion. My initial impressions were that I enjoyed it in the same manner that I had "Rosetta" and "La Promesse". The structure was complimentary: details brought to our attention through inference and action rather than blatant repetitive dialogue. The focus was on the actions, often mundane, of one character who we were to bond, learn about, and voyeuristically view with his simple day-to-day mannerisms of existence. The film climaxed late with a blurted-out confession (much less eviscerating than "La Promesse"). Yes, many areas were duplicated in the Dardenne's previous work... but saying that I was only moderately disappointed in this lack of divergence for "The Son". In the overall acceptance of the film, it did however lack something for me. Whether it was the ability of Olivier Gourmet to carry the film or, what I would more likely surmise, that each piece of the formulated puzzle did not progress in the same manner as I was anticipating. Each scene in "Rosetta", for example, was an important lynchpin in the entire feel of the story. In The Son, I did not find this was the case. Perhaps, like many great cinema achievements this film will grow on me. In fact, I am certain it will. I still recommend it as a great work by two studious and highly detailed auteurs. It did hit me, but perhaps not as hard as I was hoping. I could have had my expectations too stratospheric, but regardless I had about 80% enjoyment and 20% "withdrawal", if that term makes any sense here. Others will surely disagree but I give this film  out of , which only goes to show my extremely high praise for their other two films.

Gary W. Tooze

Posters

Theatrical Release: May 23rd, 2002 - Cannes Film Festival, France

Reviews                        More Reviews                        DVD Reviews

DVD Comparison:

New Yorker - Region 1- NTSC vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL

(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - LEFT vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

Distribution

New Yorker Video

Region 1  - NTSC

Artificial Eye
Region 2 - PAL
Runtime 1:39:06 1:39:12 (4% PAL speedup)
Video

1.66:1.00 Letterboxed WideScreen / 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.88 mb/s
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

1.66:1.00 Letterboxed WideScreen / 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.67 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes

Bitrate:

New Yorker

.

Bitrate:

 

Artificial Eye

 

Audio French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)

French (Dolby Digital 5.1), DUB: Italian (Dolby Digital 5.1)  

Subtitles English, and none English, Dutch, Italian, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: New Yorker Films

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.66:1

Edition Details:
• Interviews with directors Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne - 1.66:1 (31:58) and star Oliver Gourmet 1.33:1 (33:20)

• Stills gallery (25)

• Filmographies

• Theatrical trailers (The Son - 1:32, Rosetta :55, La Promesse 1:11)



DVD Release Date: May25th, 2004
Keep Case

Chapters 18

Release Information:
Studio: Artificial Eye Company Limited

Aspect Ratio:
Anamorphic widescreen- 1.66:1

Edition Details:

  • Interviews with directors Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne - 1.66:1 (31:58) and star Oliver Gourmet 1.33:1 (33:20)
  • Stills gallery (25)
  • Filmographies
  • Theatrical trailers (The Son - 1:32, Rosetta :55, La Promesse 1:11)
  • Interactive menus
  • Scene selection

DVD Release Date: July 28th, 2003
Transparent Keep Case (2 discs)
Chapters: 18

Comments:

New Yorker obviously purchased and ported the Artificial Eye transfer, but they did not adjust for the PAL speedup by re-mastering on NTSC. Hence we have a lot of ghosting and a less sharp image. New Yorker did make this a dual layered DVD and was able to squeeze in all the Extras from the Artificial Eye's 2 disc set onto one disc since they did not utilize the Italian dub, the 5.1 French audio or the alternate (than English) subtitles that the Region 2 disc has. (NOTE: The Artificial Eye is two single layered discs). Even the New Yorker Extras have 'ghosting'. The New Yorker DVD has that usual greenish tinge that many of their releases have. Skin tones look a shade redder in the Artificial Eye. The New Yorker has a minimal amount cropped off the top edge. The Artificial Eye subtitles are superior as well.

To read an extensive article on PAL Speedup (which both discs have by the way) from our friends at Masters of Cinema  please visit HERE. 

 - Gary W. Tooze





DVD Menus

(
New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - LEFT vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - RIGHT)


 


 

Subtitle Samples

 

(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)


 


Screen Captures

(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


 

(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

NOTE: Prevalent 'ghosting' on the New Yorker - see Francis' head and the boy in the red shirt

 

 


(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


 

(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

NOTE: Prevalent 'ghosting' on the New Yorker

 

 


(New Yorker - Region 1 - NTSC - TOP vs. Artificial Eye - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 

DVD Box Covers

Distribution

New Yorker Video

Region 1  - NTSC

Artificial Eye
Region 2 - PAL

 


Hit Counter


Report Card:

 

Image:

Artificial Eye

Sound:

Artificial Eye

Extras: Artificial Eye (no ghosting on interviews)
Menu: -

 




 

DONATIONS Keep DVDBeaver alive:

CLICK PayPal logo to donate!

Gary Tooze

Many Thanks...