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The Martin Scorsese Film Collection

directed by Martin Scorsese
USA 1972 - 1980

 

      Boxcar Bertha       New York, New York           The Last Waltz           Raging Bull Special Edition            

 

DVD Review: MGM -  Region 1 - NTSC

       

 

Distribution MGM -  Region 1 - NTSC
Audio English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (2.0) (Some have French etc. DUBs
Subtitles English, Spanish, French, None

Features

Release Information:
Studio: MGM Home Video

 

Aspect Ratio:
Varying in each film

 

Edition Details:
• 4 Scorsese films -' all with commentary:
New York, New York
• Raging Bull (Special Edition)
• The Last Waltz
• Boxcar Bertha
• Number of discs: 4

DVD Release Date: February 8th, 2005

Cardboard Box with 4 Keep Cases

 

Comments:

MGM are a weak DVD producer. They rarely have the consumer in mind like a Warner or Criterion. It is always about where to portion their dollars to maximize profit. So MGM think "How do I sell some of Scorsese's lesser features in our catalogue?" - box it with one of his masterpieces! Perhaps I am being a little too cynical. Not meaning to totally deride Boxcar Bertha, New York, New York or The Last Waltz, but when listing Martin Scorsese's best films in order, they might tend to be in the lower half. The big problem with this boxset is continuity - aside from Scorsese being the director - these films have nothing in common.

 

Probably the big gripe for many is the non-anamorphic New York, New York - I also suspect they have cropped it.  Hollywood have such a problem with putting 1.66 films properly on DVD. Do they think that their purchasers won't understand the black bars down the edges? They mostly tend to crop them to 1.78 - and we usually don't put up enough fuss about that.

 

Raging Bull is the selling feature, but our extensive comparison HERE had expectations that ended on a disappointing note. I don't recommend this boxset. Buy them individually unless you are such a fan to want all the eclectic releases.

 

Gary W. Tooze

 

Recommended Reading  (CLICK COVERS or TITLES for more information)

directed by Martin Scorsese

USA 1972

 

Boxcar Bertha, Martin Scorsese's first studio film for Hollywood, shot on the limited budget of $600,000, is slightly better than its formulaic offering. It comes off as a fair imitation of the recent box office smash Bonnie and Clyde. This impersonal Scorsese project, based on the memoirs of the real Boxcar Bertha Thompson, shuns anything heavy or smacking of politics, and instead concentrates on the farcical nature of the work. There are set comedy and almost hard-core sex pieces, that seemed more commercially intended than artistic. This is not one of Scorsese's stronger films. But it gets by on the charms of its stars, Barbara Hershey and David Carradine, and it's filled with the latest cinematic tricks such as quick fades and dreamy soft-focuses. There are also some breezy characters who are easy to handle and add a certain corny charm. It gets away with its mix of hayseed comedy antics and some bloodshed, as it all appears as harmless fun until the murders start coming-- culminating in, of all things, a crucifixion.

Excerpt of Dennis Schwartz's review on Ozu's World located HERE 

 

out of

 

Posters

Theatrical Release: June 14th, 1972

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Cover and Individual purchase link

 

 

 

     

      

CLICK logo to order the whole Boxset! 

     

    

Runtime 1:28:03
Video

1.33:1 Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.95 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s 

Bitrate:

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Features: Release Information:
Studio: MGM

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen letterboxed - 1.85:1

Edition Details:
• trailer (2:30)

DVD Release Date: January 11th, 2005
Keep case

Chapters 16



DVD Menus

 


Subtitle Sample

 

 


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directed by Martin Scorsese

USA 1977

 

 New York, New York (directed by Martin Scorsese, 1977) was a commercial failure and not his most critically acclaimed outing. It is too stylized for some, plus there are Liza Minelli loathers and others who don't want Robert DeNiro playing romantic leads—which, admittedly, he has rarely done well... but this movie is the exception, probably because he plays an uncharming lout who is a talented jazz saxophonist named Jimmy Doyle. Liza plays a big-hearted, big-voiced chanteuse named Francine Evans. They struggle professionally and their relationship disintegrates. At the end, Jimmy returns and Francine keeps herself from throwing her love his way again. Trés triste, but the right move.

Excerpt of Stephen O. Murray's Review on E-Opinions located HERE 

 out of   

 

Posters

Theatrical Release: June 21st, 1977

Reviews     More Reviews     DVD Reviews

Cover and Individual purchase link

 

 

      

       

CLICK logo to order the whole Boxset! 

     

    

Runtime 2:42:55
Video

1.64:1 Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.53 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s 

Bitrate:

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Features: Release Information:
Studio: MGM

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen letterboxed - 1.64:1

Edition Details:
• Commentary by director Martin Scorsese and film critic Carrie Rickey
• Introduction by Martin Scorsese
• 25 minutes of alternate takes and deleted scenes
• Photo gallery
• Original theatrical trailer

DVD Release Date: Feb 8th, 2005
Keep case

Chapters 32



DVD Menus

 


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Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 

 

directed by Martin Scorsese

USA 1978

 

The Last Waltz remains an unusually dignified portrait of rock excess. Since its release in 1978, Martin Scorsese's documentary of the Band's star-studded "farewell" show in 1976 -- it reformed in the '80s, minus guitarist Robbie Robertson -- has been widely imitated by other concert films. Yet its most striking quality is its sense of restraint. The manic editing of most rock movies since Woodstock is largely absent. Simply put, Scorsese knew that when he had one camera on Muddy Waters belting out "Mannish Boy," there was no point to cutting away to a shot of an usher just for the sake of variety.

 

As for the Band's music, history has been kind to it, too. The rustic terrain staked out by these four Canadians and one American on classic albums like 1968's Music From Big Pink and 1969's The Band has been fertile ground lately, both for the recent wave of alt-country acts and the bluegrass veterans celebrated on O Brother, Where Art Thou's blockbuster soundtrack. One wishes there was even more of the Band in The Last Waltz, because the guests tend to push the hosts out of the spotlight. Some (Muddy Waters, Dr. John, Van Morrison and a surprisingly vigorous Bob Dylan) are terrific while others (Neil Diamond, Eric Clapton) are less so. The jury's still out on whose outfit is the most regrettable: is it Diamond's combo of red shirt, blue blazer and orange shades, Morrison's spangly purple jumpsuit or Ronnie Wood's white polyester faux-tuxedo shirt?

 

Intercut with the concert footage are interview segments in which the nervy Scorsese tries to pal around with the infinitely cooler Band members -- the director's awe for his friend Robertson, who later created soundtracks for The Color of Money and Casino, is still very amusing. Out in May, the forthcoming DVD includes some previously unseen backstage and onstage action. But The Last Waltz belongs in a movie theatre, where new audiences can fully appreciate the refurbished sound mix, which is so clean that you can nearly understand what Dylan is singing.

 

Excerpt from Jason Anderson Eye Weekly located HERE

out of   

  

Posters

Theatrical Release:  April 26th, 1978 - USA

Reviews    More Reviews    DVD Reviews

Cover and Individual purchase link

 

 

 

     

   

CLICK logo to order the whole Boxset! 

     

 

Runtime 1:56:32
Video

1.33:1 Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 7.71 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s 

Bitrate:

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Features: Release Information:
Studio: MGM

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen letterboxed - 1.85:1

Edition Details:
• Commentary by Robbie Robertson and Martin Scorsese
• New 5.1 audio remix and new transfer
• Featurette: "Revisiting The Last Waltz"
• Archival outtakes: Jam 2
• Photo gallery

DVD Release Date: May 7th, 2002
Keep case

Chapters 30



DVD Menus

 


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directed by Martin Scorsese
USA 1980

 

“I remember those cheers. They still ring in my ears. And for years they'll remain in my thoughts. Cuz one night I took off my robe. And what'd I do, I forgot to wear shorts. I recall every fall, every hook, every jab, the worst way a guy could get rid of his flab. As you know, my life was a jab. Though I'd rather hear you cheer, when I delve into Shakespeare, "A Horse, a Horse, my Kingdom for a Horse." I haven't had a winner in six months . I know I'm no Olivier, but if he fought Sugar Ray, he would say, that the thing ain't the ring, it's the play. So gimme a stage, where this bull here can rage. And though I can fight, I'd much rather recite. That's entertainment. That's entertainment.”

Jake LaMotta

 

Considered Scorsese's masterpiece and one of the best films of the 1980's. A candid and frightening tale of insecurity, denial and self punishment through the guise of a cult boxing hero - one of the toughest fighters of his era. Scorsese's constant intense focus on the main character, Jake LaMotta, is both revealing and hypnotic. De Niro's performance may be recognized as the greatest of his career. Overall this is fantastic cinema. out of

 

Posters

Theatrical Release: November 14, 1980

Reviews    More Reviews  DVD Reviews

Cover and Individual purchase link

 

 

 

  

CLICK logo to order the whole Boxset! 

     

 

Runtime 2:08:52
Video

1.85:1 Aspect Ratio 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 7.75 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s 

Bitrate:

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Features:

 

Release Information:
Studio: MGM

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen letterboxed - 1.85:1

Edition Details:
• Commentary by director Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker
• Commentary by director of photography Michael Chapman, producer Irwin Winkler, music producer Robbie Robertson, producer Robert Chartoff, actress Theresa Saldana, actor John Turturro, and supervising sound effects editor Frank Warner
• Commentary by writer Mardik Martin, writer Paul Schrader, boxer-author Jake LaMotta, and LaMotta's nephew Jason Lustig
• "Raging Bull: Before the Fight": documentary on the writing, casting, and preproduction of the film
• "Raging Bull: Inside the Ring": in-depth look at the choreography and the shooting of the fight scenes
• "Raging Bull: Outside the Ring": Behind-the-scenes stories
• "Raging Bull: After the Fight": featurette on the sound design, music, and impact of the film
• "The Bronx Bull": making-of documentary
• "De Niro vs. LaMotta": shot-by-shot comparison of De Niro and LaMotta in the ring
• Newsreel footage of the real LaMotta
• Original theatrical trailer

DVD Release Date: Feb 8th, 2005
Digipak inside slip case

Chapters 35



DVD Menus

Disc 2

 


 

Subtitle Sample

 

 


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Gary Tooze

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