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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(after page is fully loaded mouse over image for 1941 title)

directed by Rouben Mamoulian / Victor Fleming
USA 1932 / 1941

 

Story has it, that Stevenson, who suffered from nightmares throughout his life, wrote the novel in one session, only to have his wife throw it into the fireplace out of horror. Not so much because of the tone of the novel, but perhaps more, because Stevenson had this dual personality within him. If she, as some stories tell, later encouraged him to rewrite it, or if he did it by himself, is unknown. But rewritten it was and today it is considered one of the classic horror tales, alongside Dracula and Frankenstein.

Unlike the other tales, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is based upon man himself, the duality of man, part good, part evil. As such, Mr. Hyde is a wordplay on the word “hide”, which again suggests repression of character, which again lead to various interpretations of the motif.

In Rouben Mamoulian’s 1932 version, the conflict is thus between the modern (civilised) and the primitive man, where Hyde was given the characteristics of a Neanderthal. This had nothing to do with the popularity of apes in 30’s horror, but was a visual representation of the primitive forces that drives man. Opposite of this, Victor Fleming’s 1941 version saw the conflict between good and evil, thus making it a matter of morality and reason. The opening sequences of both films stresses the approach: In the 1932 version, Jekyll lectures at the university, in the 1941 version, a priest lectures the congregation.

Another significant difference between the two versions is, that the 1932 version is overtly sexual, while the 1941 version is very much toned down. Not only does Miriam Hopkins strip naked in front of the camera, she even licks the cloth of Hyde (a most provocative image) and is a prostitute. Contra to this, Ingrid Bergman is decent and promoted to barmaid. In fact, Fleming’s version is extraordinary decent, only having a few “risky” sequences, like the now restored and inserted dream sequence, where Hyde whips naked Turner and Bergman as horses.

Henrik Sylow

Theatrical Release: December 31, 1931 (New York) / August 12, 1941 (New York)

DVD Reviews

DVD Review:

Sandrew Metronome (Dobbelte Klassisk Film) - Region 2 - PAL

Big thanks to Henrik Sylow for all the Screen Caps!

(1932 version - LEFT vs.1941 version - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

or buy NTSC versions

  

or buy NTSC versions

  

Distribution

Sandrew Metronome

Region 2 - PAL

Sandrew Metronome
Region 2 - PAL
Runtime 1:32:02 (4% PAL speedup) 1:48:12 (4% PAL speedup)
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.90 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.96 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Sandrew Metronome (Dobbelte Klassisk Film)

Bitrate:

 

Sandrew Metronome (Dobbelte Klassisk Film)

Audio 1.0 Dolby Digital Mono

1.0 Dolby Digital Mono

Subtitles English, French, Spanish, Portoguese, Danish, Swedish, Croatian, Slovenian, Czech, Greek, Hungarian, Dutch, Romanian English, French, Spanish, Portoguese, Danish, Swedish, Croatian, Slovenian, Czech, Greek, Hungarian, Dutch, Romanian
Features Release Information:
Studio: Sandrew Metronome

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Audio Commentary by Greg Mank
• Bugs Bunny: Hyde and Hare (6:48)
• 1941 Theatrical Trailer (3:34)
• ...
• The DVD is a flipper. The 1932 feature is on side A, the 1941 feature is on side B.

DVD Release Date: July 6, 2004
Double Keep Case

Chapters 25

Release Information:
Studio: Sandrew Metronome

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• None

 

DVD Release Date: July 6, 2004
Double Keep Case

Chapters 28

 

Comments While both film still has minor scratches, the image, especially of the 1941 version, both are beautiful to watch. Sharp in detail and smooth in tone. Some scenes are more soft than others, but this may very well be contributed the use of soft focus filters and / or quality of newly inserted material.

The DVD is a DVD10, which means, it’s a flipside, with one version on side A and the other on side B, both versions are DVD5, taking up about 75% of the disc. Why Warner has chosen to cheapen out like that and not do a double DVD (DVD9) edition, which quiet possible would allow even better picture, is questionable.

The only notable additional material is the audio commentary by film historian Greg Mank on the 1932 version. This is an incredible informative commentary, ranging from production history, over accounts of the actors, over analytic notes to context. The information and anecdotes just keeps on coming and they never become tiresome.

While Mank covers part of the 1941 production on this commentary, it still is curious that so much effort is put into one version of the film and nothing into the other. One might be inclined to say, that this is a DVD presentation of the 1932 version, with the 1941 as additional material.

 - Henrik Sylow





DVD Menus

(
1932 version - LEFT vs.1941 version - RIGHT)
 

 

 


 

Screen Captures

(1932 version - TOP vs.1941 version - BOTTOM)

 

 


(1932 version - TOP vs.1941 version - BOTTOM)

 

 


(1932 version - TOP vs.1941 version - BOTTOM)

 

 


(1932 version - TOP vs.1941 version - BOTTOM)


(1932 version - TOP vs.1941 version - BOTTOM)

 

 

DVD Box Covers

or buy NTSC versions

  

or buy NTSC versions

  

Distribution

Sandrew Metronome

Region 2 - PAL

Sandrew Metronome
Region 2 - PAL

 


 

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Gary Tooze

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