directed by Jacques Tati
France 1974

Jacques Tati's last - and least known - film, Parade, sees his return to the boisterous music hall world in which he began his career as a mime artist in the 1930s. Ostensibly nothing more than a series of circus acts hosted by Tati and preformed for a family audience, Parade is in fact a brilliantly conceived spectacle which blurs all distinctions between performers and audience, accomplished acrobats and children at play. Offering gloriously funny visual gags that flow beautifully from one act to another - including several of his most famous pantomimes - Parade is the perfect stage for Tati's comic genius.

'It's a sign of this films greatness that the enormous sadness that accompanies the final leave-taking of the circus interior is a good deal more than the conclusion of an unpretentious evening's entertainments; it's a sublime and awesome coda to the career of one of this century's greatest artists.' 

- Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

***

Robert Frost noted upon verse libra vs. ordinary verse, that it was as playing tennis without a net. In his review Roger Ebert suggests that “Parade” is verse libra in film. Not a bad simile at all, as there is nothing of substance in “Parade” at all, even to the point of Tati actually playing tennis, without a net… and a ball.

“Parade” is the last film by Jacques Tati. His two prior films, “Playtime” and “Traffic” had been failures and while they had been hell to finance, he was now completely unable to find any backers for his projects. Along came Swedish television, who offered him a tiny budget and a three day shooting schedule. The result was “Parade”.

It is not really a film, nor is it Tati. There is no structure or plot. Its more an anarchic exercise in Tati comedy, which he himself called “out of control music hall”. One could go as far as to call it a recording of an amateur circus rehearsing their acts.
 

Henrik Sylow

Posters

Theatrical Release: May 12, 1974 (Cannes Film Festival)

Reviews        More Reviews        DVD Reviews

DVD Comparison: 

DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL vs. BFI - Region 2- PAL

Big thanks to Henrik Sylow for the Review!

DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL LEFT vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL RIGHT

DVD Box Cover

 

Distribution

DVDY Films

Region 2 - PAL

BFI Video

Region 2 - PAL

The individual release is also available the BFI's The Jacques Tati Collection which includes Jour de fête / Les Vacances de M. Hulot / Mon Oncle / Playtime and Parade.

Runtime 1:24:27 (4% PAL Speedup) 1:24:33 (4% PAL Speedup)
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.5 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 8.19 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s
Bitrate: DVDY

Bitrate BFI

Audio 1.0 Dolby Digital French Mono 2.0 Dolby Digital French Mono
Subtitles None English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: DVDY Films

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:

DVD Release Date: June 12, 2002
Amarey

Chapters 12

Release Information:
Studio: BFI Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Interview with Tati (19:10)

• Illustrated booklet with essays by Philip Kemp and Jonathan Rosenbaum, biography and credits.

DVD Release Date: June 22nd, 2009
Keep case

Chapters 11

Comments

NOTE: Criterion's Complete Jacques Tati Blu-ray Collection is compared/reviewed HERE!

 

ADDITION: BFI Video - Region 2 - PAL - June 09': My copy is a screener but appears to have the same content and transfer that will be commercially available. It's quite an advancement upon the 'DVDY Films' transfer although still suffers from its more organic roots. It's dual-layered with a healthy bitrate - colors look about the same and detail is a slight notch above the older DVDY release (that does not offer English subtitles - although largely unnecessary). The BFI has a great extra feature - a rare, 20-minute, interview with Tati filmed in London 1977 and an illustrated booklet with essays by Philip Kemp and Jonathan Rosenbaum.

 

This is a very amusing film that again showcases Tati's remarkable talents. The BFI is obviously the way to go and the Tati interview is a fabulous supplement.

Gary Tooze

 

***


 

ON THE DVDY Release (2002): "Parade" was shot on videotape by Swedish television and it is most likely that tape, which is the source for this DVD transfer. When Facets made their theatrical print in 86, they did it from the tape as well. The picture is quite hazy and suffers from edge enhancement.

There is a Dutch DVD version of "Parade" (release date: May 24, 2004) from Film Freak. If it is a port from the same source or better I don't know.


 - Henrik Sylow

 


DVD Menus

 

DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL LEFT vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL RIGHT

 
 
 

 


 

Screen Captures

 

DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVDY Films - Region 2 - PAL TOP vs. BFI - Region 2 - PAL BOTTOM

 

 


DVD Box Cover

 

Distribution

DVDY Films

Region 2 - PAL

BFI Video

Region 2 - PAL

The individual release is also available the BFI's The Jacques Tati Collection which includes Jour de fête / Les Vacances de M. Hulot / Mon Oncle / Playtime and Parade.

 


 

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   CANADA

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