(aka 'Angst and Alienation in America' or 'Untitled Wim Wenders Project')

Directed by Wim Wenders
USA 2004

 

  Land of Plenty isn't for everyone, but patient viewers will be rewarded with a poignant look at life in America today. The screenplay by director Wim Wenders and Michael Meredith, from an original story by Wenders and Scott Derrickson, concerns Lana (Michelle Williams), a young woman returning to live in the U.S. after years abroad. While working as a missionary, Lana tries to locate her only living relative, an uncle named Paul (John Diehl), but once she finds him, he wants nothing to do with her. Paul is a Vietnam veteran living in fear of outsiders attacking America; he travels in a van throughout the day and night spying on people who look suspicious to him. Finally, Paul allows Lana into his life when a sudden and unexpected killing of an Arab man forces them together in order to figure out the mystery behind the murder.

Excerpt from Film Journal International located HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: September 9th, 2004 - Venice Film Festival

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DVD Review: IFC - Region 1 - NTSC

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Distribution IFC - Region 1 - NTSC
Runtime 1:58:44 
Video 1.78:1 Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.25 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s 

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

Audio English (Dolby Digital 2.0) 
Subtitles English, Spanish, None
Features

Release Information:
Studio: IFC Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio 1.78:1

Edition Details:

• Commentary by director Wim Wenders
• 8 deleted scenes

DVD Release Date: October 10th, 2006

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Chapters: 16

 

 

Comments:

IFC continue to irritate me with their sub-standard interlaced transfers. This exhibits the same hazy qualities that other IFC DVD productions usually display (see I Am a Sex Addict - although their Lonesome Jim is progressive). It is in the 1.78 aspect ratio and is certainly viewable via a tube (CRT) system. Franz Lustig's cinematography really suffers with the poor transfer. IFC can be forgiven somewhat as it does have a Wenders commentary.

In the commentary director Wenders discusses the speed in which they were able to make the film - from his conception to start filming in less than a month. he also divulges the cast and crew fee - where it be director or star - it was $100/day. Wenders describes the video image looking great theatrically. There are 8 deleted scenes.

As with Down in the Valley - I suspect the existing Nordic transfers will be superior and we may compare one day. The film has a lot of Wenders in it - slow pace, but far more a political juncture than I have seen from him before. It survives with the same gentle tact of most of his work, but unfortunately that usual means the pacing is too labored for many. I liked it - as I do most of his work, but you may disagree. I do suggest giving it a spin to determine for yourself - you may be very pleasantly surprised.  

Gary W. Tooze

 





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Distribution IFC - Region 1 - NTSC




 

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