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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka " Ivan's Childhood" or "Ivanovo detstvo" or "Childhood of Ivan" or "My Name Is Ivan" or "The Youngest Spy")

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/tarkovsky.htm
Soviet Union 1962

The debut feature from the great Andrei Tarkovsky, Ivan’s Childhood is an evocative, poetic journey through the shadows and shards of one boy’s war-torn youth. Moving back and forth between the traumatic realities of WWII and the serene moments of family life before the conflict began, Tarkovsky’s film remains one of the most jarring and unforgettable depictions of the impact of violence on children in wartime.

***

Andrei Tarkovsky presents an austere, bleak and haunting portrait of lost innocence in Ivan's Childhood. Tarkovsky uses sharp, contrasting scenes of light and darkness to visually delineate between the idealization of a normal life and its seeming elusiveness in the hopelessness of war: the brightness of the sunshine during Ivan's dream sequences and Kholin's courtship of the nurse, Masha (Valentina Malyavina) at a birch forest provide a jarring transition from the dark trenches, murky swamps, and poorly lit barracks of the battlefield. Nevertheless, within the daylight sequences, Tarkovsky continues to reinforce a pervasive sense of entrapment and helplessness: the spider web on the opening shot; Ivan bathing in the well; Kholin's stolen kiss from Masha while straddling a trench. What emerges is an ominous and incongruent coexistence of nature and frontiers, humanity and cruelty, youth and nihilism - a reflection of the austere and unnatural landscape of war.

Excerpt from Acquarello's comment on the Strictly Film School website located HERE

Posters

Theatrical Release: April, 1962 - Soviet Union

Reviews                                                                         More Reviews                                                                    DVD Reviews

 

Comparison:

Criterion - Region 1 - NTSC vs. MK2 - Region 0 - PAL vs. Artificial Eye - Region 0 - PAL vs. Spectrum (Korean) - Region 3 - NTSC vs. Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray vs. Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Thanks to Kevin Parent for the Korean DVD Screen Captures 

1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP LEFT

2) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP MIDDLE

3) Artificial Eye - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP RIGHT  

4) Spectrum - Region 3 - NTSC - BOTTOM LEFT

5) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM MIDDLE

6) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM RIGHT

 

Box Covers

  

 

 

Distribution Criterion Collection (Spine # 397) - Region 1 - NTSC

MK2 (France)

Region 0  - PAL

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 0  - PAL

  

 

Spectrum (Korea) 
Region 3 - NTSC
Criterion Collection - Spine # 397  - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Distribution Criterion Collection (Spine # 397) - Region 1 - NTSC

MK2 (France)

Region 0  - PAL

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 0  - PAL

Spectrum (Korea) 
Region 3 - NTSC
Criterion Collection - Spine # 397  - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Runtime 1:35:09 1:30:48 (4% PAL speedup) 1:30:54 (4% PAL speedup) 1:30:51 (4% PAL speedup) 1:35:13.082 1:34:51.560
Video 1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio 
Average Bitrate: 6.79
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s
1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio 
Average Bitrate: 6.39 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio 
Average Bitrate: 6.40 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio 
Average Bitrate: 6.80
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 43,107,439,534 bytes

Feature: 27,895,498,752 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.98

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 46,567,035,880 bytes

Feature: 27,360,374,784 bytes

Video Bitrate: 35.00

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes

Bitrate:

 Criterion

Bitrate:

 MK2

Bitrate:

Artificial Eye.

Bitrate: Spectrum

 

Bitrate: Criterion Blu-ray

 

Bitrate: Artificial Eye Blu-ray

 

Audio Russian (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono) Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1), Russian (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono) DUB: Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1) Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1), Russian (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono)

Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1), Russian (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono)

LPCM Audio Russian 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit LPCM Audio Russian 768 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 768 kbps / 16-bit
Subtitles English and none Russian, English, Deutsch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Hebrew, Mandarin, Japanese, None English, Russian and none English, Russian, Korean and none English and none English and none

Features

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Video appreciation of filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky and Ivan's Childhood, featuring Vida T. Johnson, coauthor of The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue • Video interviews with cinematographer Vadim Yusov and actor Nikolai Burlyaev
• 30-page Liner booklet featuring an essay by film scholar Dina Iordanova and new translations, by Robert Bird, of "Between Two Films," Andrei Tarkovsky's essay about Ivan's Childhood, and "Ivan�s Willow," a poem by the director's father, Arseny Tarkovsky

 

DVD Release Date: July 24th, 2007
Keep case

Chapters 18

Release Information:
Studio: MK2

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio - 1.37:1

Edition Details:
• Archive Section with two short films: Children of War (18:28), and Scenes from Tarkovsky's "The Steamroller and the Violin" (4:56) with removable white subtitles
• 3 Interviews, Yevgany Zharikov (18:26), Vyacheslov Ochinnikov (33:19), Vadim Yusoz (33:20) - with removable white sub-titles
• Bios of 14 Production staff over 43 static pages
• Photo Gallery with 8 restored Photos

 

DVD Release Date: May 25th, 2002
Think slip case with no sleeve

Chapters 15

English subs on all Extras

Release Information:
Studio: Artificial Eye

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio - 1.37:1

Edition Details:
• Archive Section with two short films: Children of War (18:28), and Scenes from Tarkovsky's "The Steamroller and the Violin" (4:56) with removable white subtitles
• 3 Interviews, Yevgany Zharikov (18:26), Vyacheslov Ochinnikov (33:19), Vadim Yusoz (33:20) - with removable white sub-titles
• Bios of 14 Production staff over 43 static pages
• Photo Gallery with 8 restored Photos

 

DVD Release Date: August 26th, 2002
Keep Case

Chapters 15

English subs on all Extras

Release Information:
Studio: Spectrum

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio - 1.37:1

Edition Details:
• Archive Section with two short films: Children of War (18:28), and Scenes from Tarkovsky's "The Steamroller and the Violin" (4:56) with removable white subtitles
• 3 Interviews, Yevgany Zharikov (18:26), Vyacheslov Ochinnikov (33:19), Vadim Yusoz (33:20) - with removable white sub-titles
• Bios of 14 Production staff over 43 static pages
• Photo Gallery with 8 restored Photo

DVD Release Date: June 11th, 2003
Keep Case

Chapters 15

English subs on all Extras

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 43,107,439,534 bytes

Feature: 27,895,498,752 bytes

Video Bitrate: 34.98

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video


Edition Details:
• Video appreciation of filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky and Ivan's Childhood, featuring Vida T. Johnson, co-author of The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue • Video interviews with cinematographer Vadim Yusov and actor Nikolai Burlyaev
• 30-page Liner booklet featuring an essay by film scholar Dina Iordanova and new translations, by Robert Bird, of "Between Two Films," Andrei Tarkovsky's essay about Ivan's Childhood, and "Ivan�s Willow," a poem by the director's father, Arseny Tarkovsky

 

Blu-ray Release Date: January 22nd, 2013
Transparent Blu-ray case

Chapters 17

 

Release Information:
Studio: Artificial Eye

Aspect Ratio:

1.37:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 46,567,035,880 bytes

Feature: 27,360,374,784 bytes

Video Bitrate: 35.00

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video


Edition Details:
 Selected scene commentary with Film Psychoanalyst Mary Wild (8:08)

 Introduction by Mary Wild (2:35)
 Interview with actor Evgeniy Zharikov (18:27)
 Interview with Director of Photography Vadim Usov (33:09)
 Interview with Composer Vyaaheslav Ovchinnikov (33:19)
 36 page booklet

 

Blu-ray Release Date: June 27th, 2016
Transparent Blu-ray case

Chapters 12

Alternate Version

There is an Region 0 PAL Italian version of Ivan's Childhood on DVD with dubs of Italian 5.1 Dolby Digital , Italian mono Dolby Digital and Russian 5.1 Dolby Digital. It has a bit arte of 5.5 mps and a Review (in Italian) can be found HERE.

 

 

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Artificial Eye - Region 'B' Blu-ray - June 2016: The new AE 1080P is much brighter than the Criterion Blu-ray. I haven't taken out the magnifying glass but I like the Artificial Eye. We've compared six captures below (some exact frame) and the side-by-side can make the Criterion a bit softer - but that is what brightness does. It's going to be a personal opinion although the Criterion might be the more accurate (the darker usually is). I presume these are different sources but I prefer a variance. I have a feeling the opinions will be strong and we can weigh in further.

NOTE: There is the opinion that the brighter appearance is due to a missing gamma correction from an encoding error. In Blu-ray authoring you often use a lossless Apple Quicktime Pro-Res file as an intermediate between the uncompressed content of an HD-tape-master and the final AVC or VC1 encoding. This Pro-Res file, like most thing made by Apple, has an error that comes with it which is that it brightens the picture. Now, if you encode the Pro-Res file without a gamma correction, your result can be a faulty Blu-ray.

The audio has a linear PCM but only 16-bit and not as technically robust as the Criterion (which is 24-bit). Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov's score still sounds poignant - some may note Ne velyat Mashe - the song played on the gramophone. The AE Blu-ray also offers English subtitles (see sample comparison below) but is region 'B'-locked.

The Artificial Eye exceeds the Criterion in the supplements with an 8-minute selected scene commentary with film Psychoanalyst Mary Wild (as well asan introduction by to this series her), plus we get the same three interviews (almost 1.5 hours worth) as found on their 2002 DVD with actor Evgeniy Zharikov, DoP Vadim Usovand composer Vyaaheslav Ovchinnikov. AE include a 36 page liner notes booklet.

This bodes well for the future AE Tarkovsky Blu-rays. Very solid package, new, valuable, supplement and what appears to be a competnet a/v

***

ADDITION: Criterion - Region 'A' Blu-ray - January 2013: The Criterion 1080P is brilliant. It seems like we have waited so long with the 2007 Picture-boxing a less satisfying stop-gap to the ultra-impressive image produced on the Blu-ray. The layered contrast and tighter detail significantly make this image quality rise to its most appreciated level. Tarkovsky's film has so many beautiful shots - just rolling one after the other - and the black and white hi-def image is extremely pleasing.

The audio is rendered in a lossless linear PCM track - clean and reasonably crisp with optional English subtitles. Extras duplicate the 2007 DVD; 'Vida T. Johnson (coauthor of The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue) gives a 30 minute video appreciation entitled 'Life as a Dream'. She discusses the significance of Ivan's Childhood in relation to the body of Tarkovsky's oeuvre. There are also two important interviews - one with the actor Nikolai Burlyaev (Ivan) - it is divided into chapters (lead role, screen tests, finding tears, the shoot and true patriot) and runs about 10 minutes in total. We have another with cinematographer Vadim Yusov - longtime Tarkovsky collaborator (Andrei Rublev, Solaris). It is also divided into chapters (visual language, preparation, dream and texture). They also run about 10 minutes in total and have some important information - very valuable. Finally we are given a nice bound 30-page liner notes booklet featuring an essay by film scholar Dina Iordanova and new translations, by Robert Bird, of "Between Two Films," Andrei Tarkovsky's essay about Ivan's Childhood, and "Ivan's Willow," a poem by the director's father, Arseny Tarkovsky.'

Some directors films are so visual (Antonioni) and it seems they were meant to be viewed in the pristine-levels of this new format. I was pretty blown-away by my viewing. Bravo Criterion - our strongest recommendation.

***

ADDITION - Criterion - Region 1- NTSC - July 07': The Criterion DVD is pictureboxed (see our description of 'pictureboxing' in our Kind Hearts and Coronets review), so it immediately gives up some resolution to the compared PAL DVDs - (than simply the standard difference). But as with existing PAL comparisons of Three Film By Hiroshi Teshigahara , the Criterion transfer is superior - sharper and cleaner - vastly improved contrast and detail. They just keep upping the bar! With the framing - I don't see the Criterion losing much, if any.

It's funny, not too long ago, I remember being ecstatic about the MK2 edition but next to the Criterion it looks like a weak sister. The French release appears a shade blown-out (see large capture set # 2). The Criterion is in original mono audio (Russian) with optional English subtitles that seems more complete than the French DVD translation, but I better say I really no which is more accurate - just that Criterion is a bit more detailed.

Criterion have included some wonderful extra features - Vida T. Johnson (coauthor of The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue) gives a 30 minute video appreciation entitled 'Life as a Dream'. She discusses the significance of Ivan's Childhood in relation to the body of Tarkovsky's oeuvre. There are also two important interviews - one with the actor Nikolai Burlyaev (Ivan) - it is divided into chapters (lead role, screen tests, finding tears, the shoot and true patriot) and runs about 10 minutes in total. We have another with cinematographer Vadim Yusov - longtime Tarkovsky collaborator (Andrei Rublev, Solaris). It is also divided into chapters (visual language, preparation, dream and texture). They also run about 10 minutes in total and have some important information - very valuable. Finally we are given a nice bound 30-page liner notes booklet featuring an essay by film scholar Dina Iordanova and new translations, by Robert Bird, of "Between Two Films," Andrei Tarkovsky's essay about Ivan's Childhood, and "Ivan's Willow," a poem by the director's father, Arseny Tarkovsky. Grand indeed and more than hopes could have wished for on all fronts. How could I not recommended?  

***

ADDITION - MK2 - May 2005 - Well I don't know why but the MK2 - seemingly also a RusCiCo port - is vastly superior to the AE and the Spectrum. It is tighter, although still sports a think black border around the edge, is sharper and has much better contrast. The blown-out contrast boosting of the Artificial Eye and the Spectrum are quite evident. The MK2 offers the same extras as the other two and also an optional French 5.1 DUB. It does still include the mono option. It is very surprising that both Mirror and Andrei Rublev are unimproved ports yet Ivan's Childhood has gotten significantly better from its initial RusCiCo publishing.

****

On the AE and Spectrum: Both discs are attributed to RusCiCo. As the Extras appears to be duplicated and the picture quality is just about the same, I can't tell you to avoid the Spectrum disc, BUT it presently only comes in a Boxset with inferior duplications of RusCiCo - Tarkovsky films ( see our Mirror comparison). So, what I am saying is don't buy the Boxset. It could be a fancy bootleg, or they could have purchased the rights from RusCiCo. I really don't know, but as far as duplications go, this one is very exact. I do notice some cropping down the left edge of the Spectrum as well as some contrast boosting so we go with the Artificial Eye.    

- Gary W. Tooze


Recommended Reading (CLICK COVERS or TITLES for more information)

 

   
The Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky (British Film Institute) (Paperback)
by Mark Le Fanu
Biography - Tarkovsky, Andrei (1932-1986): An article from: Contemporary Authors
by --Sketch by Les Stone
Tarkovsky
by Jean-Paul Sartre (Contributor), Marc Forster (Contributor)
Instant Light: Tarkovsky Polaroids
by Giovanni Chiaramonte and Andrei A. Tarkovsky
Tarkovsky: Cinema as Poetry by Maya Turovskaya Andrei Tarkovsky: Elements of Cinema
by Robert Bird
The Sacred Cinema of Andrei Tarkovsky
by Jeremy, Mark Robinson
Andrei Tarkovsky (Pocket Essentials S.) (Paperback)
by Sean Martin
The Films of Andrei Tarkovsky: A Visual Fugue by Vida T. Johnson and Graham Petrie Andrei Tarkovsky: Interviews (Conversations With Filmmakers Series) Sculpting in Time: Reflections on Cinema by Andrei Tarkovsky
      out of out of

Menus

 

(Criterion - Region - - NTSC LEFT vs. MK2 - Region 0 - PAL RIGHT)

 

 
 
 


(
Artificial Eye - Region 0 - NTSC - LEFT vs. Spectrum - Region 3 - NTSC - RIGHT)

 

 

Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 

 

Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 


 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Screen Captures

 

1) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - TOP

2) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

 

1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP 

2) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - SECOND

3) Artificial Eye - Region 0 - NTSC - THIRD  

4) Spectrum - Region 3 - NTSC - FOURTH

5) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM



1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP 

2) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - SECOND

3) Artificial Eye - Region 0 - NTSC - THIRD  

4) Spectrum - Region 3 - NTSC - FOURTH

5) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


 

1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP 

2) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - SECOND

3) Artificial Eye - Region 0 - NTSC - THIRD  

4) Spectrum - Region 3 - NTSC - FOURTH

5) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP 

2) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - MIDDLE

3) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

1) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - TOP

2) Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

1) Criterion - Region 1- NTSC TOP 

2) Criterion Collection - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

More Criterion Blu-ray Captures


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Report Card:

 

Image:

Blu-ray

Sound:

Criterion Blu-ray

Extras: Artificial Eye / Blu-ray

 

Box Covers

  

 

 

Distribution Criterion Collection (Spine # 397) - Region 1 - NTSC

MK2 (France)

Region 0  - PAL

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 0  - PAL

  

 

Spectrum (Korea) 
Region 3 - NTSC
Criterion Collection - Spine # 397  - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gary Tooze

Many Thanks...