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Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection

Bombshell (1933)    The Girl from Missouri (1934)    Reckless (1935)

 Riffraff (1936)        Suzy (1936)       Personal Property (1937)       Saratoga (1937)

JEAN HARLOW 7-MOVIE COLLECTION - BOMBSHELL Glamour queen Lola (Harlow) is quitting the movie biz – something her manipulative press agent (Lee Tracy) can’t allow! THE GIRL FROM MISSOURI Eadie’s not easy! A plucky bachelorette (Harlow) intends to bag a New York millionaire…without abandoning her virtue. RECKLESS Harlow goes dramatic as a Broadway star accused of murder after the death of her high-living, high-society hubby. With William Powell, the last real-life love of Harlow’s short life. RIFFRAFF She works in a cannery. He’s a fisherman. But their playful romance is fated to give way to a tragedy surrounding union activism. She’s Harlow, he’s Spencer Tracy. SUZY A heroine buffeted by fate! Harlow, Cary Grant and Franchot Tone in a World War I triangle of romance and spy intrigue. PERSONAL PROPERTY Glittery fun! Debt-ridden socialite Harlow puts on a show of wealth to impress a suitor who’s also making a pretense of fortune. Robert Taylor is the butler who sees through the ruses. SARATOGA The flag is up for thoroughbred fun as Harlow is engaged to a millionaire, but drawn to Clark Gable.

 

DVD Box Cover

CLICK to order from:

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

 

Comments

For the centennial of Jean Harlow in 2011, Warner Archive Collection released this lavish 100th Anniversary Collection of 7 of her MGM films from 1933 until her untimely death in 1937, including her final film, Saratoga with Clark Gable. Three of the missing films were restored and released just a year later - The Secret Six, Red Dust and Hold Your Man. At this time, only 2 films starring Ms. Harlow are missing from digital format - Universal's Iron Man and Fox's Goldie. While not her best or most famous films, all seven titles in this collection are A-pictures from one of the best studios in Hollywood featuring strong support to Jean Harlow from her male leads - Lee Tracy, Franchot Tone, Lionel Barrymore, William Powell, Spencer Tracy, Cary Grant, Robert Taylor, Clark Gable. My favorites here are probably three earlier films that are also available separately - a lone pre-code in this collection Bombshell, The Girl from Missouri and Reckless, but four other films are enjoyable as well and we recommend picking up the whole collection rather than three titles separately - it's a better value.

All seven titles come in a separate keep case on a single-layered made-on-demand disc. 3 of the earliest titles mentioned above were also part of a new restoration. There is still some specs and excessive grain, but they are looking better than ever before on home video. The remaining four titles have their share of marks and specs; Suzy and Saratoga transfers look much softer. They surely show their age, but this is still a nice presentation considering age of the films and the quality of existing film elements. The mono audio is decent. Each film has some kind of added bonus - a Spanish-language trailers for Bombshell and The Girl from Missouri; theatrical trailers for Reckless, Riffraff, Personal Property and Saratoga; Lux Radio Theater Production of Madame Sans-Gene with Harlow and Robert Taylor on Personal Property disc; Radio promotion Leo Is on the Air for Reckless and Suzy; and finally four pre-recording sessions on the MGM stage from Reckless. The boxset also includes a collection of seven MGM publicity photos of Ms. Harlow. To learn more about Jean Harlow, we recommend a Dinner at Eight disc for a TCM documentary Harlow: The Blonde Bombshell (or to learn even less - a very 1960's disappointing biopic with Carol Baker - Harlow. Overall, this is highly recommended release from Warner Archives and would make a great gift for the holiday season.

  - Gregory Meshman

 


(aka "Blonde Bombshell" )

 

directed by Victor Fleming
USA 1933

 

Jean Harlow is the "bombshell" of the title, a popular movie actress named Lola. Though she seemingly has everything a girl could possibly want, Lola is fed up with her sponging relatives, her "work til you drop" studio, and the nonsensical publicity campaigns conducted by press agent Lee Tracy. She tries to escape Hollywood by marrying a titled foreign nobleman, but Tracy has the poor guy arrested as an illegal alien. Finally Lola finds what she thinks is perfect love in the arms of aristocratic Franchot Tone, but she renounces Tone when his snooty father C. Aubrey Smith looks down his nose at Lola and her profession. Upon discovering that Tone and his entire family were actors hired by Tracy, Lola goes ballistic--until she realizes that Tracy, for all his bluff and chicanery, is the man who truly loves her. Allegedly based on the career of Clara Bow (who, like Lola, had a parasitic family and a duplicitous private secretary), Bombshell is a prime example of Jean Harlow at her comic best. So as not to mislead audiences into thinking this was a war picture, MGM retitled the film Blonde Bombshell for its initial run.

Poster

Theatrical Release: 13 October 1933

Reviews                                  More Reviews                               DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow:100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

 

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:35:27
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.83 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Spanish Trailer (2:09)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 35

 


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(aka "100 Per Cent Pure" or "Born to Be Kissed" or "Eadie Was a Lady")

directed by Jack Conway
USA 1934

 

Originally titled Eadie was a Lady, this Jean Harlow vehicle was slated for release under the title Born to be Kissed, but the new Production Code vetoed this "suggestive" cognomen. After a brief and uncomfortable period as One Hundred Percent Pure, the film was finally shipped to theaters as The Girl From Missouri. Harlow plays Eadie, a sexy gold-digger who promises to remain chaste until she finds a wealthy husband. Travelling to New York in the company of her best friend Kitty (Patsy Kelly), Eadie manages to keep that promise, though for a while it looks as though she'll succumb to the charms of playboy T. R. Paige Jr. (Franchot Tone). Once Paige has proven that his intentions are basically honorable, Eadie must break down the resistance of T. R. Paige Sr. (Lionel Barrymore), who is dead-set against his son's romance and intends to frame the girl in a compromising position. She gets even with Paige Sr. by framing him, but there's still a couple of reels to go before the happy ending. Except for some provocative costuming, Jean Harlow's character is essentially decent, thereby "cleansing" some of the more risque elements of this enjoyable romantic comedy. The film's best line is delivered by Patsy Kelly who, when propositioned by an elderly roue, snarls "Look at this! Death takes a holiday!

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Poster

Theatrical Release: 3 August 1934

Reviews                             More Reviews                         DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

 

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:11:51
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 7.52 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Spanish Trailer (2:31)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 23


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


 

directed by Victor Fleming
USA 1935

 

Reckless is a delightfully breezy screwball comedy from the same director (Victor Fleming) and star (Jean Harlow) responsible for the celebrated Bombshell (itself a film Ó clef loosely based on Clara Bow) -- with the added appeal of William Powell. One can readily see the chemistry between the two stars at work, which would lead to their impending marriage at the time of Harlow's death a year later. The sets for the Broadway number that Harlow's Mona Leslie performs in are also extraordinary. Mona Leslie (Jean Harlow) is an up-and-coming Broadway actress, dancer, and singer, who leads a happy-go-lucky, freewheeling lifestyle; bailed out of jail by family friend Ned Riley (William Powell), a sports promoter who loves Mona but won't slow down his lifestyle long enough to give her the satisfaction of admitting it, she performs in a bizarre "benefit" show, only to discover that she has an audience of one, wealthy admirer Bob Harrison (Franchot Tone). He declares his love for her and a romance does develop, but when he proposes marriage, he discovers that his upper-crust set won't accept a showgirl as one of their blue-blood crowd.

Their romance leads to a marriage and desperate unhappiness for all concerned, most of all Harrison, whose basic neurotic nature gets worse as the marriage deteriorates. When Harrison takes his own life, Riley and Mona find themselves accused of every foul deed possible, and when Mona gives birth to a son, a legal battle ensues over custody of the child, with Harrison's family claiming that she is unfit. Finally, Mona decides to fight back -- she gets Harrison's family to stand down by giving up any claim to her late husband's money, but she must now contend with the nation's self-appointed moral guardians. No producer will take the risk of backing a show with Mona in it, but she finally gets a helping hand from Ned Riley. The movie has a few too many changes in tone, which detracts from the verisimilitude. The whole story is a film Ó clef based on the tragic romance between torch singer Libby Holman and tobacco heir Smith Reynolds (which also provided fodder for such Ó clef films as Brief Moment, Sing, Sinner, Sing, and Written on the Wind) -- and Harlow's singing is obviously dubbed, just as her dancing is doubled. Also, the songs -- except for the final two numbers -- don't quite fit with the melodrama, and the Damon Runyon-esque comic antics feel completely out of left field at times. But when she and Powell are onscreen together, the film just lofts into the air, past all of those flaws.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Poster

Theatrical Release: 19 April 1935

Reviews                 More Reviews                   DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

 

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:37:06
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.54 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Audio Vault - Radio promotion Leo Is on the Air (7:06)
• Audio Vault - Four pre-recording sessions on the MGM stage
• Theatrical Trailer (2:33)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 38


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


 

directed by J. Walter Ruben
USA 1936

 

Jean Harlow took a stand for respectability on-screen and off in this 1936 dramatic comedy and came out the winner on both counts. The challenge this time out was to get the public to buy her not just as a good girl; they'd done that two years earlier when she played a modest miss in The Girl From Missouri (1934). This time audiences had a new challenge to face - the platinum blonde had gone natural.

Harlow's hair was the distinctive feature that had gotten her into the movies in the first place. But ever since her arrival at MGM in 1932, she'd been fighting for the chance to adopt a more natural color. By 1936, with her star power at its height, she finally had the clout to have her way. "I've gotten over acting with my hair," she announced, and the studio finally agreed to let her use her natural, reddish brown color. MGM Publicity Chief Howard Strickling even came up with a new word to describe it, "brownette."

Harlow had more than a little help in making her transition to good-girl roles. With Riffraff (1936) she had a solid script from Frances Marion and Anita Loos, both of whom had played a key role in her rise to stardom. Marion, who wrote the original story about romance and labor problems in a fishing community (with Harlow as "the toast of the tuna fleet" according to The New York Times), had worked on the script for Dinner at Eight, one of the films that had put Harlow over as a film star and helped create her image as a dumb but goodhearted tart. Loos had written Harlow's ultimate role as a seductress, the social climbing secretary in Red-Headed Woman, a racy tale turned into a box-office hit by Harlow's uninhibited comic playing.

Poster

Theatrical Release: 3 January 1936

Reviews                             More Reviews                       DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:33:45
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.83 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Theatrical trailer (2:44)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 28

 


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


directed by George Fitzmaurice
1936

Suzy is the film in which Cary Grant, overcome by the beauty and vivacity of Jean Harlow, sings her a love ballad! This lighthearted moment aside, Suzy, adapted from a novel by Herbert Gorman is a standard-issue love triangle, set against the tapestry of World War I. Harlow plays a London showgirl, married to Irish engineer Franchot Tone. When foreign spy Benita Hume shoots Tone, mistaking him as a threat against her mission, the terrified Harlow flees into the night, certain that she will be accused of her husband's murder. After the war breaks out, Harlow, believing herself a widow, falls in love with handsome aviator Cary Grant. She marries the well-bred but irresponsible young ace, only to discover that Tone has not been killed after all! This being an idealized World War I film, somebody is going to end up sacrificing his/her life on behalf of somebody else, but we're not about to reveal any more.

Poster

Theatrical Release: 26 June 1936 (premiere)

Reviews                      More Reviews           DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

 

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:33:09
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.83 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Audio Vault - Radio promotion Leo Is on the Air (14:05)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 26


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


(aka "The Man in Possession" )

directed by W.S. Van Dyke
USA 1937

 

A golddigger finds that romance doesn't always equal finance in this comedy. Crystal Wetherby (Jean Harlow) is an American widow left stranded in London with a stack of debts incurred by her late husband and barely a shilling to her name. Raymond Dabney (Robert Taylor) is the black sheep of a formerly wealthy family who has just been released from prison for fraud and is looking for work. Crystal hires Raymond to watch over her home so that her creditors won't repossess her belongings; Raymond soon learns that Crystal is being courted by his brother Claude (Reginald Owen), much to Raymond's amusement, since both Crystal and Claude are motivated less by love than the mistaken belief that the other has money. However, Crystal and Raymond become increasingly fond of each other, even though they know they're both flat broke. The supporting cast features two of Old Hollywood's favorite U.K. expatriates, E.E. Clive and Una O'Connor.

Poster

Theatrical Release: 19 March 1937

Reviews        More Reviews       DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collectio) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

CLICK to order from:

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:23:33
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.25 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Madame Sans-Gene - Lux Radio Theater Production (59:12)
• Theatrical Trailer (1:26)

DVD Release Date: October 25th, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 28

 


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


 

directed by Jack Conway
USA 1937

 

Jean Harlow offers her final screen performance in this witty and -- in retrospect -- quite moving racetrack comedy-drama co-starring Clark Gable and Walter Pidgeon. When her father dies shortly after losing his horse farm to Duke Bradley (Gable), Carol Clayton (Harlow) refuses the handsome bookmaker's offer to forget the debt and instead vows to pay him back in full. She even forbids her stockbroker fiancÚ, Harley Madison (Pidgeon), to make wagers that may benefit Duke, but promises to marry him once her champion horse wins at Saratoga. But against all the odds, Carol falls in love with Duke and when he appears in danger of ruination, she finds herself rooting for the competitor to win the all-important race. Saratoga, which was finished using both onscreen and voice doubles for Jean Harlow, was partially filmed on-location at Lexington and Louisville, KY, and in Saratoga Springs, NY

Poster

Theatrical Release: 23 July 1937

Reviews                        More Reviews                         DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Warner Home Video (Jean Harlow: 100th Anniversary Collection) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Gregory Meshman for the Review!

DVD Box Cover

Also available individually:

Also available in the Jean Harlow 100th Anniversary Collection (Bombshell / The Girl from Missouri / Reckless / Riffraff / Suzy / Personal Property / Saratoga)

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:32:03
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 5.91 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate

Audio Dolby Digital Mono (English)
Subtitles None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Theatrical trailer (1:39)

DVD Release Date: October 25, 2011
7 Keepcases in a box

Chapters 25

 


DVD Menus
 

 


Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 


DVD Box Cover

CLICK to order from:

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 0 - NTSC

 




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