Search DVDBeaver

S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka 'Here and Elsewhere')

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/godard.htm
France 1976

 

Jean-Luc Godard (Breathless) initiated his radical video period with this startling film that combines videotape and film, enabling him to superimpose more than two images simultaneously. Made as part of the "Dziga Vertov Group", with Jean-Pierre Gorin and Anne-Marie Mi‚ville, the film was commissioned by the Palestinians and originally titled Until Victory. The film's original purpose was to examine life in the Palestinian camps. But following the defeat of the Palestinian army in the Six Day War, Ici et Ailleurs was radically transformed becoming a meditation on how cinema records history. Godard, Gorin and Mi‚ville contrast a French family (Here) with an impressionistic portrait of Palestine (Elsewhere) reflected and transmitted by television, books and pictures.

***

Initially begun as a documentary about Palestinian revolutionaries, Ici et Ailleurs (in English, Here and Elsewhere) was ultimately transformed into an hour-long filmed essay addressing the relationship between politics and image, the problems of documentary filmmaking, and the danger of media saturation. Collaborators Jean-Pierre Gorin and Anne-Marie Melville began the film with funding from Palestinian forces, under the title Victory, intending to create a sympathetic portrait of the revolutionaries as a true people's movement. Not long after the filmmakers' return to France, however, most of their subjects were killed in warfare, and the issues behind the film no longer seemed so simple. At this point Jean-Luc Godard joined the production, helping create a series of scenes focusing on the life of a middle-class French family; this is the "Here" portion of the film, with Palestine as "Elsewhere." By editing together documentary and fictional footage, and commenting on these images through photo collages, title screens, and other reflexive techniques, the film questions the association between political thought and the structures of fiction. Ultimately, Ici et Ailleurs seems suspicious of all images, even its own; the suggestion is that all films, especially documentaries, present a false, constructed vision of reality.

Posters

Theatrical Release: September 15th, 1976

Reviews       More Reviews       DVD Reviews

DVD Review: Olive Films - Region 1 - NTSC

DVD Box Cover

   

CLICK to order from:

Distribution Olive Films - Region 1 - NTSC
Runtime 0:54:54 
Video 1.33:1 Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.97 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s   

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

Audio French (Dolby Digital 2.0) 
Subtitles English (fixed)
Features

Release Information:
Studio: Olive Films

Aspect Ratio:
Original Aspect Ratio 1.33:1

Edition Details:

• none 

DVD Release Date: June 26th, 2012

Keep Case
Chapters: 8

 

Comments:

Typical Olive Films bare-bones release. It is in the 1.33:1 aspect ratio and progressively transferred. There is some grain and the source, from Gaumont, is very clean. There are fixed, yellow English subtitles and there are no extras on the single-layered disc.

As for the film, I defer to Jonathan Rosenbaum's comments at The Chicago Reader HERE: "Jean-Luc Godard's short feature about the PLO was initially shot with Jean-Pierre Gorin in the Middle East in 1970, but when he edited the footage with Anne-Marie Mieville several years later, many of the soldiers that had been filmed were dead. Reflecting on this fact, as well as on the problems of recording history and of making political statements on film, Godard and Mieville produced a thoughtful and provocative essay on the subject. Coming after the mainly arid reaches of Godard's “Dziga Vertov Group” period (roughly 1968-1973), when his efforts were largely directed toward severing his relation with commercial filmmaking and toward forging new ways to “make films politically,” this film assimilates many of the lessons he learned without the posturing and masochism that marred much of his earlier work. The results are a rare form of lucidity and purity. All proportions guarded, it is a little bit like hearing John Coltrane's “Blues for Bessie” after the preceding explorations of “Crescent” and “Wise One” on his Crescent album."

Short film at less than an hour but even hardcore Godard fans might find this pricey. I believe there was a Japanese DVD release of this but I don't own to compare. 

Gary W. Tooze

 


DVD Menus


 


Subtitle Sample

 

 


 

Screen Captures

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


DVD Box Cover

   

CLICK to order from:

Distribution Olive Films - Region 1 - NTSC



Search DVDBeaver
S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

 

Hit Counter

 

DONATIONS Keep DVDBeaver alive:

CLICK PayPal logo to donate!

Gary Tooze

Thank You!