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A view on Blu-ray by Gary W. Tooze

Jodorowsky's Dune [Blu-ray]

 

(Frank Pavich, 2013)

 

 

Review by Gary Tooze

 

Production:

Theatrical: City Film (II)

Video: Sony

 

Disc:

Region: 'A' (as verified by the Momitsu region FREE Blu-ray player)

Runtime: 1:30:14.409

Disc Size: 29,675,157,042 bytes

Feature Size: 20,257,572,864 bytes

Video Bitrate: 24.62 Mbps

Chapters: 12

Case: Standard Blu-ray case

Release date: July 8th, 2014

 

Video:

Aspect ratio: 1.78:1

Resolution: 1080p / 23.976 fps

Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio English 2954 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 2954 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
Descriptive Audio:

Dolby Digital Audio English 640 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps

 

Subtitles:

English (SDH), English, French none

 

Extras:

• Deleted Scenes (46:24)

• Theatrical Trailer (2:03)

Previews

Bookmarkable

DVD included

 

Bitrate:

 

 

Description: In 1975, director Alejandro Jodorowsky began work on his most ambitious project yet. Starring his own 12-year-old son alongside Orson Welles, Mick Jagger, David Carradine and Salvador Dalí, featuring music by Pink Floyd and art by some of the most provocative talents of the era, including H.R. Giger and Jean “Moebius” Giraud, Jodorowsky’s adaptation of the classic sci-fi novel DUNE was poised to change cinema forever. Through interviews with legends and luminaries including H.R. Giger (artist, ALIEN), Gary Kurtz (producer, STAR WARS EPISODES IV ' V) and Nicolas Winding Refn (director, DRIVE), and an intimate and honest conversation with Jodorowsky, director Frank Pavich’s film finally unearths the full saga of ‘The Greatest Movie Never Made’.

 

 

The Film:

A product of wild ambition, unfettered creativity, and more than a little madness, Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune remains one of history's most infamous films maudit, a movie either too imaginative or too fanatical to actually be produced. The result of several years of work by a wild-eyed surrealist at the height of his powers, with significant contributions from an all-star, multi-disciplinary team of creatives, the film's pre-production yielded one gigantic, rarely seen dossier, stocked with preliminary sketches, and little else. Yet the memory lives on, and is now primed to be spun further into legend with this nifty, breezy documentary by Frank Pavich.

Opening with, and dominated by, interviews with the Chilean director, the film delves into his background in avant-garde theater, which set the stage for the international success of El Topo and The Holy Mountain, works which gripped the imagination of newly freethinking early-'70s filmgoers. For Jodorowsky, who touts himself as an autodidact outsider uninterested in the tired games of narrative or traditional Hollywood success, this meant the chance to blow open the world's mind with the cinematic equivalent of an LSD trip, something he saw as a sacred duty.

Excerpt from Slant Magazine located HERE

 

Filmmaker Frank Pavich explores one of cinema's great "what ifs" in this documentary detailing Alejandro Jodorowsky's aborted feature adaptation of Frank Herbert's celebrated sci-fi novel Dune. With the release of El Topo (1970) and its psychedelic follow-up The Holy Mountain (1973), Jodorowsky became not only a pioneer of psychedelic surrealism in film, but also the father of the "Midnight Movie." Following the success of those two films, the Chilean director began focusing all of his energies on translating Dune to the big screen. The film was to star Jodorowsky's own son Brontis along with a stunning cast that included Orson Welles, David Carradine, Mick Jagger, and Salvador Dali, with Pink Floyd providing the score, and art direction by H.R. Giger and Jean "Moebius" Giraud. Two years into the massive production, however, the film was suddenly and unceremoniously cancelled. Yet even today, numerous relics of that ambitious production -- including thousands of enticingly vivid storyboards -- still exist. In this film, Pavich offers movie lovers a tantalizing glimpse at a masterpiece that was never meant to be.

Excerpt from MRQE located HERE

Image :    NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

The documentary Jodorowsky's Dune arrives on Blu-ray from Sony. It doesn't look particularly impressive but most are less-concerned with the video quality when it comes to the documentary genre. It is clean and very clear with some occasional depth. The quality is consistent with a few vintage interview infusions (Dali) looking notably weaker. There are some effect treatise for the film but nothing extravagant.  The majority is a variety of interviews with a look at storyboards and some stills. Jodorowsky is very affable and honest. This is a progressive HD transfer in the 1.78 aspect ratio.  There are no flaws and the BD produces, what appears to be, an authentic presentation as compared to the one shown at many festivals.

 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audio :

Audio is transferred in a DTS-HD Master 5.1 track at 2954 kbps. The surround may seem, largely unnecessary as the feature is essentially dialogue/narration. Very clean and audible. There is also a 'Descriptive Audio' track option in simply Dolby. There are English subtitles for the non-English spoken parts (mostly Jodorowsky) and optional for the entire film. The disc is region 'A' Blu-ray locked.

 

Extras :

The supplements include about 45-minutes of scenes that didn't make it into the 1.5 feature. There is more of the same, delving into unnecessary detail, or repeated information, but some of the scenes are interesting. There is a theatrical trailer, Sony previews, the disc is 'bookmark-able' and the package includes a DVD of the feature and extras.

 

 

BOTTOM LINE:
This is a fascinating topic that I knew very little about. Jodorowsky's Dune exports all the director's endless passion and need for a creative outlet. What a fanatical, and misunderstood, journey.  The Sony Blu-ray produces an adequate presentation - and the deleted scenes will be appreciated - adding further content. I think a lot of film fans will really like this - there is value here for buffs and those who enjoy the director's work as well as Herbert's book. Recommended! 

Gary Tooze

June 26th, 2013

 

About the Reviewer: Hello, fellow Beavers! I have been interested in film since I viewed a Chaplin festival on PBS when I was around 9 years old. I credit DVD with expanding my horizons to fill an almost ravenous desire to seek out new film experiences. I currently own approximately 9500 DVDs and have reviewed over 5000 myself. I appreciate my discussion Listserv for furthering my film education and inspiring me to continue running DVDBeaver. Plus a healthy thanks to those who donate and use our Amazon links.

Although I never wanted to become one of those guys who focused 'too much' on image and sound quality - I find HD is swiftly pushing me in that direction.

Gary's Home Theatre:

60-Inch Class (59.58” Diagonal) 1080p Pioneer KURO Plasma Flat Panel HDTV PDP6020-FD

Oppo Digital BDP-83 Universal Region FREE Blu-ray/SACD Player
Momitsu - BDP-899 Region FREE Blu-ray player
Marantz SA8001 Super Audio CD Player
Marantz SR7002 THX Select2 Surround Receiver
Tannoy DC6-T (fronts) + Energy (centre, rear, subwoofer) speakers (5.1)

APC AV 1.5 kVA H Type Power Conditioner 120V

Gary W. Tooze

 

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