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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "Avere Vent'Anni" or "Being Twenty")

 

directed by Fernando Di Leo
Italy 1978

 

Lia (Gloria Guida, SO YOUNG LOVELY AND VICIOUS) and Tina (Lilli Carati, THE ALCOVE) are two "young, hot, and pissed off" twenty year old women on the road. They hitchhike, shoplift, and flirt their way to Rome where they find digs at the commune of Nazariota (Vito Caprioli, RULERS OF THE CITY). They are taken aback when Nazariota suggests that they "satisfy desires" (putting the communing in commune) to contribute to the upkeep of the debt-ridden dive. Lia doesn't mind ("so long as they are clean") but Tina prefers to have a choice, and handsome Raymond Lovelock's perpetually-tripping Rico is the only one of the unwashed that tickles her fancy (actually she tickles his... while he's sleeping). Fed up with a series of "unfinished quickies" Tina drags Lia along as they seek other means of making money, including selling encyclopaedias door to door to middle class customers who are more interested in their nubile forms. When the commune becomes the subject of a TV documentary, the police plant drugs and conduct a raid. Lia and Tina get deported back to their home towns, but fate has something else in store for them at a remote roadside restaurant. Daniela Doria (forever mistreated in Lucio Fulci's horror films like CITY OF THE LIVING DEAD, HOUSE BY THE CEMETERY, and especially NEW YORK RIPPER) is on hand as a single mother of triplets. AVERE VENT'ANNI is not really director Fernando Di Leo's commentary on the youth movement(s), more so his sour commentary on seventies Italy. No one really comes off well here. The hippies are unwashed, some comatose from their drug use, the middle class are hypocrites, the authorities are corrupt (they don't mind drug use and prostitution, but they'll set you up if you get political), men really believe that women who rebuff them are lesbians who just haven't found the right man, and wearing a short skirt is tantamount to leading them on. As shocking as the ending of Di Leo's original cut it, it is necessary to spoil it in any discussion of the film. Di Leo does not side with the rapists (roughnecks spurned on by a seemingly impotent suited voyeur who perpetrates the film's most gruesome act), he has stated that the film is about girls who think they are free getting killed for being free. The negative reaction to the ending was such that the producers ordered a drastic recut of the film, deleting the downbeat finale, shuffling scenes, and generally dumbing down any political themes, winding up with a fluffy sexpoloitation movie. It was this version that served as the basis for the English dubbed version (supervised by dubbing artist Nick Alexander and actor/writer Robert Booth), which additionally had a new title sequence and replaced all of the score and Italian-language songs with CAM-licensed music selected by Donatella Ibba (wife of composer Carlo Maria Cordio). This version (possibly working from rewritten and redubbed Italian dialogue for the recut) also marginalized or completely inverted several of Di Leo's more liberal social and political statements. In the Italian version, a rather crass individual states that feminism is too complicated and that they should leave it to the women, whilst in the English version he simply says that feminism is too complicated for the female mind. The documentary filmmaker states in the Italian version that Catholicism, Marxism, and psychoanalysis have produced conditions conducive to schizophrenia, while in the Italian version, he states that the combination of Christianity, Marxism, and psychoanalysis have revealed the shortcomings of all other theories and theologies. The recut version is a nonsensical bit of softcore sexploitation for most viewers, but may leave a sour taste for viewers more familiar with the original cut of the film.

Eric Cotenas

Poster

Theatrical Release: 14 July 1978 (Italy)

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DVD Comparison:

Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC

Big thanks to Eric Cotenas for all the Screen Caps!

(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - LEFT vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

 

 

Distribution

Raro Video USA

Region 0 - NTSC

Runtime 1:37:33 1:23:42
Video

1.84:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 7.7 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.85:1 Original Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.3 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Raro Video USA (Director's Cut)

 

Bitrate:

Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version)

 

Audio Italian Dolby Digital 2.0 mono

English Dolby Digital 2.0 mono

Subtitles English, none none
Features Release Information:
Studio: Raro Video USA

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.84:1

Edition Details:
• Twenty Years for a Massacre: documentary (4:3; 29:46)
• DVD Credits
• Liner Notes Booklet by Nathaniel Thompson

DVD Release Date: 16 August 2011
Amaray

Chapters 10

Release Information:
Studio: Raro Video USA

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.85:1

Edition Details:
• Photo Gallery
• Director Biography
• Driector Filmography
• DVD Credits

 

DVD Release Date:
Amaray

Chapters 10

 

Comments

NOTE: The first pressing of this edition had some defects. The director's cut snapped back to the menu after chapter 10 (there are 11 chapters), both discs were labeled "director's cut." The re-pressed fixes these flaws.

The director's cut of TO BE TWENTY is progressive and anamorphic, but looks rather dull. The print is largely clean, but green vertical scratches show up once in a while. This is probably the best this version can look since the negative was cut to create the fluffy reissue version. As such, the single layer, progressive, anamorphic presentation of the theatrical cut (actually a re-release after the negative reaction to the original version) may be a little boosted, but is overall the more pleasing visual presentation with brighter colors and more detail. The Raro Italy DVD featured the Italian track and English subtitles on the director's cut (this version was never dubbed), and both English and Italian tracks (but English subtitles) on the recut version. Raro's US DVD drops the Italian track from the recut. The theatrical cut is missing the entirely different English opening titles sequence (a montage of stills and the girls frolicking in the waves set to a frenetic disco track) in favor of the Italian hitchhiking credits sequence, but features the English language end credits crawl. The English track features an entirely different music score and replaces all of the Italian language songs (including the main theme sung by actress Gloria Guida). The documentary "Twenty Years For A Massacre" features commentary from director Fernando Di Leo, actors Raymond Lovelock, Leopoldo Mastelloni, Giorgio Brocardi, and producer's son Gianluca Curti, who goes into the specifics of the recutting (he released the recut version of the film on VHS in Italy in the early eighties and had to do some redubbing to parts of the Italian track). Filmographies and a liner notes booklet by Nathaniel Thompson are included, but the promised original screenplay is not included on either disc.

Prior to the Raro Italy and Raro USA releases, the film was issued in its recut version on VHS in the US by Private Screenings, and then on DVD in Japan in its Italian version (full-screen and probably optically fogged), and as an unauthorized NTSC Region 0 2-disc set (non-anamorphic and from inferior sources) from Alfa Digital that featured exclusive short interviews with Di Leo and Lovelock (speaking English).

 - Eric Cotenas

 



DVD Menus
(
Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - LEFT vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - RIGHT)


 

 

 


 

Screen Captures

(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)
Subtitles sample (on director's cut)

 


(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)

 


(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)

 


(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)

 


(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)

 


(Raro Video USA (Director's Cut) - Region 0 - NTSC - TOP vs. Raro Video USA (Theatrical Version) - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM)

 


DVD Box Covers

 

 

Distribution

Raro Video USA

Region 0 - NTSC



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