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A view on Blu-ray by Gary W. Tooze

 

Humanoids From the Deep (aka 'Monster') [Blu-ray]

 

Barbara Peeters + Jimmy T. Murakami (uncredited), 1980

 

 

Review by Gary Tooze

 

Production:

Theatrical: New World Pictures

Video: Shout! Factory

 

Disc:

Region: 'A'-locked (as verified by the Momitsu region FREE Blu-ray player)

Runtime: 1:19:41.902

Disc Size: 23,422,990,632 bytes

Feature Size: 15,856,607,232 bytes

Video Bitrate: 22.99 Mbps

Chapters: 12

Case: Standard Blu-ray case

Release date: August 3rd, 2010

 

Video:

Aspect ratio: 1.78:1

Resolution: 1080p / 23.976 fps

Video codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Audio:

LPCM Audio English 2304 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2304 kbps / 24-bit

 

Subtitles:

None

 

Extras:

• Never-Before-Seen Deleted Scenes (7:19 in HD!)
• TV And Radio Spots (:32 X 2)
• Leonard Maltin Interviews Roger Corman On The Making Of The Film (3:26 in SD)
• The Making Of Humanoids From The Deep Featuring New Interviews With Composer James Horner, And Second Unit/Assistant Director James Sbardellati (22:42 in HD!)

Posters and Stills Gallery
• New World Trailers

 

Bitrate:

 

 

Description: Something evil is happening in the sleepy fishing village of Noyo. Fishlike humanoid creatures, spawned by mutant DNA, begin rising from the ocean looking to mate with the local women. Scientist Susan Drake (Ann Turkel) along with local fisherman Jim Hill (Doug McClure, The Land That Time Forgot) seek to investigate the cause of this invasion of creatures from the ocean floor. But when the annual Salmon Festival begins, some unwanted guests are about to crash the festivities. Also starring Vic Morrow (Message From Space), Cindy Weintraub (The Prowler) and Denise Galik (Don't Answer The Phone).

 

 

The Film:

Regardless of its utilitarian title, it should be stated that Humanoids from the Deep is about humanoids. This is important to note, because in construction it is easily confused with a film about a great white shark. It opens, for example, with an underwater POV shot, presumably of one of the nefarious creatures of the title, and in short order people begin to die watery deaths—an aural hallmark of Not John Williams’ composition accompanying each. This is an entertaining film, to be sure, but these influences, in their clarity, amplify this film’s derivation, framing its unmet potential as a more singular monster movie.

To illustrate its derivation, let’s compare a humanoid from the deep with a great white shark. In their cinematic depictions mentioned here, both creatures are able to maneuver through shallow waters with consummate prowess and discretion, snatching a victim and mangling him gruesomely without breaking the surface. Each is also equally capable of inspiring riotous fear in swarms of beach-goers. These similarities are most significant considering the humanoids have prehensile thumbs, legs, can breathe air, and can walk on land; nonetheless, they opt to torment humans in much the same way as the shark in Jaws. Now, let’s consider for a moment what a movie like Jaws would have been – nay, should have been – had its principal creature featured such improved mobility. Granted, this would not be the masterpiece of restraint and suspense that is Jaws, but it would certainly promise a more unpredictable genre exercise than Humanoids from the Deep.

Excerpt from Rumesly Taylor at Not Coming to a Theater Near You located HERE

 


Image :    NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.
 

Firstly this is advertised as the "The Uncut International Version" and DOES INDEED seem to have all the previously discussed gore at around 1 hour 4 minutes (located, for now, on YouTube HERE).

 

Of the Shout! Factory Corman Blu-rays that we've covered so far under the 'Cult Classic' label - Death Race 2000 , Piranha, and Galaxy of Terror - this looks the most... polished.  The image quality can be smooth and detailed but there are still instances of heavy grain and noise. It probably looked quite similar to this theatrically 30 years ago. This is only single-layered with a decent bitrate and colors look richer than SD could produce. The 1.85:1 aspect ratio film is framed for 1.78 here. It can surprise at times but is generally only modest looking overall. Hopefully the captures should give you a good indication.

 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Audio :

Shout Factory remain true with a linear PCM 2.0 channel stereo track at a healthy 2304 kbps. Once again they avoid the fake bump and remix but the lossless transfer often sounds like it has minor separation... although it cannot. Screams and shrieks are buoyed with depth and bass to produce the required tension. There are no subtitles and my Momitsu has identified it as being a region 'A'-locked.

 

 

Extras :

Extras aren't bad at all with 7-minutes of "Never-Before-Seen Deleted Scenes". Here you will find an abundance of nudity - in HD. The most appealing supplement though is the 22-minute Making Of Humanoids From The Deep featuring new interviews with composer James Horner, and second Unit/Assistant Director James Sbardellati. We get 3-minutes of Leonard Maltin interviewing Roger Corman about his input in Humanoids From the Deep, less than a minute of TV and Radio Spots (:32 X 2), a posters and stills gallery and, the typical, New World trailers.

 

 

BOTTOM LINE:
I happen to really like 'bad' cinema but I wouldn't want it getting any worse than Humanoids From the Deep. It's typical of this sub-genre - lots of young female bare breasts, throw in plenty of gore, the best 'star power' you can muster (here it's Doug McClure) and mix well with a less specific script. The screen captures should give you a good idea of what you are in for. Admittedly, I found the cheese factor here quite high and, predictably, plenty fun. Those keen on buying the Blu-ray will be well aware of the routine. Friday night with buddies is when to view - have plenty of beer handy - or alone with a healthy Scotch. Enjoy... 

Gary Tooze

August 5th, 2010

 

 


 

About the Reviewer: Hello, fellow Beavers! I have been interested in film since I viewed a Chaplin festival on PBS when I was around 9 years old. I credit DVD with expanding my horizons to fill an almost ravenous desire to seek out new film experiences. I currently own approximately 9500 DVDs and have reviewed over 3500 myself. I appreciate my discussion Listserv for furthering my film education and inspiring me to continue running DVDBeaver. Plus a healthy thanks to those who donate and use our Amazon links.

Although I never wanted to become one of those guys who focused 'too much' on image and sound quality - I find HD is swiftly pushing me in that direction. So be it, but film will always be my first love and I list my favorites on the old YMdb site now accessible HERE.  

Gary's Home Theatre:

60-Inch Class (59.58” Diagonal) 1080p Pioneer KURO Plasma Flat Panel HDTV PDP6020-FD

Oppo Digital BDP-83 Universal Region FREE Blu-ray/SACD Player
Momitsu - BDP-899 Region FREE Blu-ray player
Marantz SA8001 Super Audio CD Player
Marantz SR7002 THX Select2 Surround Receiver
Tannoy DC6-T (fronts) + Energy (centre, rear, subwoofer) speakers (5.1)

APC AV 1.5 kVA H Type Power Conditioner 120V

Gary W. Tooze

 

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