(aka "Batoru rowaiaru II: Chinkonka" )

 

directed by Kenta Fukasaku & Kinji Fukasaku
Japan 2003

 

When "Battle Royale" was released, it caused a nationwide hysteria and hype in Japan. Kids would drop classes to attend sold out screenings, and you could buy Battle Royale action figures, even for the minors in lego-version. In the west, "Battle Royale" hit the cult circuit like a tidal wave, gaining instant fame for its violence and context, and even critics had a hard time turning it down, as it was a great film with a very disturbing socio-political subtext.

Such a success had to be followed up by a sequel, and it became "Battle Royale 2 – Requiem". Sadly, the sequel not only was inferior, but also became the last film by Kinji Fukasaku, who passed away during production.

While the story of "Battle Royale" was an abstraction on the situation of students in Japan, the storyline in "Battle Royale 2 – Requiem" was pure stupidity. Here, three years later, the survivor of the original "Battle Royale" has formed an anti-government terrorist organisation, and a group of teenagers are given three days to locate his group and kill them, otherwise they will die. The premise alone is very far fetched, as why would teenagers without combat training be better at the job than professional soldiers. Instead of any logic in the plot, "Battle Royale 2 – Requiem" invests in violence and action, creating drama by having teenagers screaming at each other or in panic when they are about to have their heads exploded by their collar.

Instead of a sequel to its original, "Battle Royale 2 – Requiem" is a sad piece of exploitive cinema, amongst others putting Kitano Takeshi on the credits, even though he is only present for a minute or so in the latter part of the film. Acting is at times laughable, especially the overacting by Riki Takeuchi, the plot is laughable and the entire film is a mockery the original.

 

Henrik Sylow

Posters

Theatrical Release: May 18, 2003 (Cannes Film Market)

Reviews    More Reviews  DVD Reviews

DVD Comparison:

Tartan - Region 2 - PAL vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL

Big thanks to Henrik Sylow for all the Screen Caps!

(Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - LEFT vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - RIGHT)

DVD Box Covers

 

Distribution

Tartan

Region 2 - PAL

Tartan
Region 2 - PAL
Runtime 2:12:48 (4% PAL speedup) 2:34:04 (4% PAL speedup)
Video

1.78:1 Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.25 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.78:1 Aspect Ratio

16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.59 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Tartan

 

Bitrate:

 

Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition)

 

Audio 2.0 Dolby Digital Japanese, 5.1 Dolby Digital Japanese, DTS Japanese

2.0 Dolby Digital Japanese, 5.1 Dolby Digital Japanese, DTS Japanese

Subtitles English, None English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Tartan

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.78:1

Edition Details:
• Original Trailer
• Director Biographies
• Director Statements
• Kinji Fukasaku filmography
• Miles Filder filmnotes

DVD Release Date: August 23, 2004
Keep Case

Chapters 20

Release Information:
Studio: Tartan

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 1.78:1

Edition Details:
• As single DVD release plus 35 mm film strip replica
• Cast soundbites (13:21)
• Japanese Premiere (17:38)
• Thoughts on Kinji Fukasaku (14:43)
• Memories of the shoot (12:50)
• Acting Workshop (16:58)
• Rehearsals (7:43)
• War! (4:19)
• Happy Birthday Kinji (6:18)
• Beethoven (4:36)
• The Warshaw Philharmonic Orchestra (11:41)
• Teaser Trailer (1:03)
• Original Trailer (1:36)
 

DVD Release Date: May 22, 2006
Tinbox with deluxe keepcase

Chapters 16

 

 

Comments The new Tinbox release consists of three discs. The first is the standard theatrical version, which prior was released by Tartan as "Battle Royale II Requiem" (left side). The second and third are the directors cut of the film and additional material.

The two versions differ, not only in length, the director's cut being 20 minutes longer, but also in design of certain scenes. (see image #1).

In regards to the standard version, the transfer is quiet good. Most of the time, the details are strong and blacks solid. There are issues with compression artifacts and the fact, that it is a NTSC to PAL version, which causes severe ghosting. The Directors cut is a weaker transfer, or copy for that matter. Details are less strong and colors are weaker. While there are no ghosting, there still are combing issues.

The sound is on both versions impressive. Especially the DTS really pushes ones system to the limit, with a deep bass and excellent use of the rears.

The additional material is a mixed bag, from quiet well produced premiere coverage to b-roll footage with at time seemingly random comments from actors and crew.

 - Henrik Sylow

 

 






DVD Menus

(
Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - LEFT vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - RIGHT)


 

 


 

Screen Captures

(Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - TOP vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)
Capture is resized from 1016px to 800px

 

 


(Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - TOP vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 

 


(Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - TOP vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)

 


(Tartan - Region 2 - PAL - TOP vs. Tartan (3 Disc Limited Edition) - Region 2 - PAL - BOTTOM)
Ghosting / Combing

 

 



DVD Box Covers

 

Distribution

Tartan

Region 2 - PAL

Tartan
Region 2 - PAL


 




 

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