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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "Early Summer' or 'Bakushű" )

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/ozu.htm
Japan 1951

The Mayima family is seeking a husband for their daughter, Noriko, but she has ideas of her own. Played by the extraordinary Setsuko Hara, Noriko impulsively chooses her childhood friend, at once fulfilling her family's desires while tearing them apart. A seemingly simple story, it is among the director’s most emotionally complex—a nuanced examination of life's changes across three generations. Another enduring Ozu classics.

Poster

Theatrical Release: October 3rd, 1951 - Japan

Reviews      More Reviews       DVD Reviews

Comparison:

Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL vs. Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC vs. BFI - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Big thanks to Henrik Sylow for the Tartan DVD Screen Caps!

1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL LEFT

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - RIGHT

 

DVD Box Covers

Distribution

Tartan

Region 0 - PAL

Criterion
Region 1 - NTSC

BFI

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Runtime 2:05:03 2:04:48 2:04:47.480
Video

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.93 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

1.33:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 6.13 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

1.33:1 - 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 22,030,927,097 bytes

Feature: 21,926,129,664 bytes

Video Bitrate: 19.99 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:

 

Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy)

 

Bitrate:

 

Criterion (Spine # 240)

 

Bitrate:

 

Blu-ray

 

Audio 2.0 Dolby Digital Japanese

2.0 Dolby Digital Japanese Mono

LPCM Audio Japanese 2304 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2304 kbps / 24-bit
Subtitles English, None English, None English, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Tartan

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Trailer (4:20)
• Photo Gallery

DVD Release Date: December 6, 2004
Triple Digipack

Chapters 24
 

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Fullscreen - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Audio commentary by Japanese-film expert Donald Richie, author of Ozu and A Hundred Years of Japanes
• Ozu’s Films from Behind-the-Scenes, a conversation about Ozu and his working methods, featuring a number of his collaborators, such as child-actor and sound technician Kojiro Suematsu, assistant camer
• Original theatrical trailer
• New and improved English subtitle translation
• Plus: a new essay by film scholar David Bordwell, author Ozu and the Poetics of Cinema, and an essay

 

DVD Release Date: July 20, 2004
Keep Case

Chapters 28

Release Information:
Studio: BFI

 

1.33:1 - 1080P Single-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 22,030,927,097 bytes

Feature: 21,926,129,664 bytes

Video Bitrate: 19.99 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

Edition Details:
• Extensive illustrated booklet featuring essays and film notes by James Bell (Sight + Sound ) and Ozu biographer Tony Rayns

• Contains DVD with Early Summer and What Did the Lady Forget?

 

Blu-ray Release Date: June 21st, 2010
Custom Blu-ray Case

Chapters 12

 

Comments

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were ripped directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: BFI Dual-format package - July 2010: This may look the best of the four Ozu Blu-ray transfers from BFI (Late Spring + The Only Son, Tokyo Story and, this, Early Summer). More than the infrequent scratches - the source, graded master materials again supplied by the Criterion Collection, has good range and density supporting improved contrast in the higher resolution. The image is very clear with nice grain and even some depth. Shadow detail is much stronger than the DVDs. I am very impressed with how Early Summer looks on this BFI Blu-ray. It gave me a fabulous presentation.

BFI have the Japanese soundtrack in a lossless linear PCM 2.0 at 2304 kbps. The disc is coded for region 'B'.  I, once again, prefer the BFI subtitle font size to either of the DVDs.

Included in this package are SD transfers sharing one DVD of both Early Summer and What Did the Lady Forget? (compared HERE) and a liner notes booklet with an essay by James Bell (Sight and Sound) and Ozu biographer Tony Rayns.

I don't see extensive value in the 'dual format' releases with an SD version sharing the DVD disc 'compression capacity' with another film. It seems unnecessary in that one of the films is accessible in the package in 1080P. But my opinion on these BFI Blu-rays is very strong- I am thrilled to see these, highly impacting, masterpiece films in the higher resolution. I am constantly thinking during my viewings of who I can show these wonderful films to. It is the best I have seen them look and sound and we again are encouraging a purchase. 

****

ADDITION: The Tartan (Dec - 04) - I am disappointed in the Tartan Boxset. In regards to price, I suppose the Tartan is the clear winner with all three of the Noriko Trilogy (includes Late Spring and Tokyo Story) and almost as cheap as one of the stacked Criterion releases. My biggest concern of the Tartans is that they appear to have used the NTSC standard transfers instead of creating their own in native PAL. I suspect they were given these masters by Shochiku, but did not convert first - and because of this the image suffers. Bottom line is that they are not that bad - not as sharp as the Criterions, and a little darker, but I greatly prefer that to artificially brightening as many of the Panorama Ozu discs are. Subtitles are also well done on all three Tartan discs. No extras to speak of, but again we go back to price point. This allows all to see these masterpiece films without breaking the bank - but we suggest breaking your bank. Criterion is obviously the superior.

Gary Tooze

Versus the poor “Tokyo Story”, this is Criterion as we know them. Stunning image, great contrast and sharpness in details. While it has minor scratches, it is really a print making it hard to put the finger on anything. Simply beautiful. Comparing it with Tartan, it is noticeable that Tartan is, again, completely spotless, but significantly darker and softer, causing details to be less sharp, especially in long shots. As such, based on these images alone, its two great images, both looking amazing, with one being superior in details, and the other in condition of source, and comparing them and taking the best from each, really makes one hope for the next edition.

But while “Early Summer” is the best of the three Tartan presentations, and looks great, which also is evident from the comparison, it suffers, although minimal, from ghosting, as it is a NTSC to PAL transfer.

As note in the
Tokyo Story comment, the final product notes on too many excuses. When one releases something as central in film history as the “Noriko Trilogy”, everyone eyes targets it, and people will be more critical than usual, because of the legacy of the films. As such, the production simply has too many excuses to be acceptable. Granted, we critics often take a production for granted, never realizing the problems involved, and they probably had a deadline for Christmas sales and some boss said no to postponing it, but there are too many hiccups production wise here, too many excuses, and regardless of a, what I personally think is, beautiful image and presentation, this is too flawed a product.

Henrik Sylow

****

On the Criterion: I have seen this film in a number of formats but this is by far the best it has ever looked. It has some minor damage (vertical scratches, etc.) mostly in the first 1/3 of the film, but that is all. The image does seem a little bright to me, but I see no evidence of digital manipulation. I suspect the print used was quite acceptable and Criterion did some (minor) restoration. Contrast is Criterion's hallmark and this DVD is no exception. Did I say 'contrast' was Criterion's strong suit? I almost forgot 'subtitles' - which are the best in all of DVD production (compared to the Panorama Ozu DVDs this is a true revelation). Sound is remastered and consistent. the Extras (commentary - that I haven't had the opportunity to delve into yet, shorts, trailer, essay) are typical of the greatest DVD production company in the entire world - strike that - UNIVERSE! If you don't purchase this DVD, then you don't know the value of the Digital Versatile Disc medium... and cinema.   out of

 - Gary Tooze


Recommended Reading for Japanese Film Fans (CLICK COVERS or TITLES for more information)

The Japan Journals : 1947-2004,

by  Donald Richie

The Midnight Eye Guide to New Japanese Film
by Tom Mes and Jasper Sharp

Kon Ichikawa (Cinematheque Ontario Monographs)

by James Quandt, Cinematheque Ontario

Shohei Imamura (Cinematheque Ontario Monographs, No. 1)
by James Quandt
Eros Plus Massacre: An Introduction to the Japanese New Wave Cinema (Midland Book, Mb 469)
by David Desser
The Films of Akira Kurosawa by Donald Ritchie

Tokyo Story

by Yasujiro Ozu, Kogo Noda, Donald Richie, Eric Klestadt

Ozu by Donald Ritchie

A Hundred Years of Japanese Film by Donald Richie

Check out more in "The Library"


DVD Menus

(Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL - LEFT vs. Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC - RIGHT)
 

 

BFI - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 


 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

Screen Captures

 

1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 


1) Tartan (Ozu Volume 1: The Noriko Trilogy) - Region 0 - PAL TOP

2) Criterion (Spine # 240) - Region 1 - NTSC MIDDLE

3) BFI Region 'B' - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

More Blu-ray captures

DVD Box Covers

Distribution

Tartan

Region 0 - PAL

Criterion
Region 1 - NTSC

BFI

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 

 


Hit Counter


Report Card:

 

Image:

Blu-ray

Sound:

Blu-ray

Extras: Criterion



 

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Gary Tooze

Mississauga, Ontario,

   CANADA

Many Thanks...