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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

directed by Tony Scott 
U.S. 1993

There are few objections to "True Romance" that I haven't thought of, and I dismiss them all with a wave of the hand. This is the kind of movie that creates its own universe, and glories in it.

The universe in question could best be located inside the in flamed fantasies of an adolescent male mind - and not any adolescent, but the kind of teenage boy who goes to martial arts movies and fantasizes about guns and girls with great big garbanzos. It is the kind of film that will make the best 10 lists of such supporters of the decline of civilization as Joe Bob Briggs.

And yet that doesn't make it bad. I've always tried to adopt a generic approach to the movies, judging each film in terms of its type and the expectations we have for it. And "True Romance," which feels at times like a fire sale down at the cliché factory, is made with such energy, such high spirits, such an enchanting goofiness, that it's impossible to resist. Check your brains at the door.

Excerpt from Roger Ebert at the Chicago Sun-Times located HERE


2 Posters, Promo pic, CD Cover, Screenplay Book (Click to enlarge where applicable)    

 

Theatrical Release Date: September 10, 1993

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Comparison:

Warner Home Video - Region 1 vs. Warner Home Video SE - Region 1 vs. Warner - Region FREE Blu-ray

1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC LEFT

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - RIGHT

 

 Box Covers

  

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 1  - NTSC

Warner Home Video SE
Region 1 - NTSC
Warner Home Video SE
Region FREE -
Blu-ray
Runtime 2:00:40 min 2:00:48 min 2:01:01.796
Video

2.20:1 Letterboxed WideScreen
Average Bitrate: 4.75 mb/s
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

Video Sourced

2.35:1 Letterboxed WideScreen Anamorphic
Average Bitrate: 7.30
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s

Film Sourced

1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 35,936,175,177 bytes

Feature: 29,354,213,376 bytes

Codec: VC-1 Video

Total Bitrate: 32.34 Mbps

 

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes

Bitrate:

Warner

Bitrate:

Warner SE

Bitrate:

Warner Blu-ray

Audio English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround) English (DTS), English (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
Available subtitles: English, Spanish, French
Director's Cut

Dolby TrueHD Audio English 1830 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1830 kbps / 16-bit (AC3 Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps)
Dolby Digital Audio English 640 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps
DUB: Dolby Digital Audio French 640 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 640 kbps
Commentary: Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / Dolby Surround
Commentary: Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / Dolby Surround
Commentary: Dolby Digital Audio English 192 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 192 kbps / Dolby Surround

Subtitles English, Spanish, French, None English, Spanish, French, None English, Spanish, French, None
Features Release Information:
Studio: Warner Studios

Aspect Ratios:
Widescreen letterbox - 2.20:1
Full Screen (Standard) - 1.33:1

Edition Details:
• Production notes
• Theatrical trailer
• Full-screen and widescreen letterbox formats

DVD Release Date: September 30, 1997

Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.35:1



Edition Details:
• Commentary by Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette
• Commentary by director Tony Scott
• Commentary by writer Quentin Tarantino
• Theatrical trailer(s)
• Innovative storyboard track allows you to access the director's storyboards while watching the film
• Web-enabled screenplay viewer with storyboards, original production notes, and web links
• 30 minutes of deleted and extended scenes with optional director commentary
• Alternate ending with optional director and writer commentaries
• Selective commentaries with Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Brad Pitt, and Michael Rapaport
• Interactive behind-the-scenes featurette
• Animated photo gallery
• Vintage 1993 production featurette

 

DVD Release Date: September 24, 2002

Custom case

Chapters: 34

Release Information:
Studio: Warner Home Video

 

1080P Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 35,936,175,177 bytes

Feature: 29,354,213,376 bytes

Codec: VC-1 Video

Total Bitrate: 32.34 Mbps

Edition Details:
• Commentary by Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette
• Commentary by director Tony Scott
• Commentary by writer Quentin Tarantino
• Innovative storyboard track allows you to access the director's storyboards while watching the film
• 30 minutes of deleted and extended scenes with optional director commentary
• Alternate ending with optional director and writer commentaries
• Selective commentaries with Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Brad Pitt, and Michael Rapaport
• Interactive behind-the-scenes featurette
• Animated photo gallery
• Vintage 1993 production featurette

• Theatrical trailer(s)

 

Blu-ray Release Date: May 26th, 2009
Standard Blu-ray case

Chapters 34

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were ripped directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Warner - Region FREE Blu-ray - May 09': This is also the 'unrated director's cut' of the film.

Something doesn't seem right here. The image on this Blu-ray is decidedly softer than I've seen from a dual-layered hi-def disc of this film's age (about 15 years). No, I don't like the look of this very much - and I was expecting more. I don't think we need to throw around terms like DNR (Digital Noise Reduction) - the images below tell just about all we need to know about the visuals. There is not a lot of depth and actually Tony Scott's other films kind of share this visual style - a 'clouded' flatter look - thick and bland - without a discernable texture. Perhaps he feels it exports a form of realism... or nostalgia. The outdoor scenes tend to look better and black levels are notably deeper.  Does it look better than the Special Edition SD-DVD? Yes - I'd say so - but not by any amount that dramatically improved the presentation on my system. To be fair the DVDs never represented a pristinely crisp image and it may very well be the original source is not especially detailed. I actually think I may have seen this theatrically, but it was far too long ago for me to recall the sharpness of the picture. Colors are certainly brighter (oft-used pinks and to a lesser degree 'reds') but sometimes look artificial. The Blu-ray is 2.4:1 and shows a shade more information on the side edges. Generally though, it doesn't seem to benefit as much from the move to high-def on the visual front as many would hope - despite the reasonably strong bitrate.

The Dolby TrueHD 5.1 track fares a little better even though it is rendered at but 1830 kbps. There is some occasional punch although not an excessive amount of depth. Separation exists in the more aggressive moments (and there are quite a few even beyond the 'blood bath' at the conclusion). Slater's distinctive voice is crisp, deep and resonating. The music tracks - Soundgarden and Billy Idol to The Big Bopper and Burl Ives - sound pretty great. There are subtitles in English, French and Spanish and my Momitsu tells me it is Region FREE!

Extras duplicate the stacked 2-disc SE and I haven't yet found anything new. Beyond the three fun commentaries with respectively Slater & Arquette, Scott and Tarantino - there is the selective scene commentary input with Hopper, Kilmer, Pitt and Rapaport and decidedly poor alt-ending (good thing it wasn't chosen) with that commentary, 34-minutes of 8 deleted and three extended scenes (with Scott commentary - pointing out production details and people like Jack Black - who had very minor roles), featurettes and more. I don't see anything in HD but it's nice to have it all on one accessible disc.

I LOVED revisiting this film and despite my reservation and general disappointment in the image my viewing gave me the same level of fun-action thrills that I recalled from my first home theater DVD screening many years ago with Tarantino's perfectly written dialogue (his first full script!). It makes you want to name your own son 'Elvis'. I'd forgotten the Brad Pitt 'stoner' scene - this is such a cool flic. In the end the reasonable price makes it worth the purchase (I think I actually paid $10 MORE for the SE-DVD.) Who knows? it may never look any better than this and it's definitely a film that deserves repeat viewings.         

Gary W. Tooze


DVD Menus
(
Warner Home Video Left vs. Warner Home Video SE Version -Right)

 


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Screen Captures

1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) Warner Home Video - Region 1- NTSC TOP

2) Warner Home Video Special - Region 1- NTSC - MIDDLE

3) Warner - Region FREE - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


More Blu-ray grabs

 

 

Report Card:

 

Image:

Blu-ray

Sound:

Blu-ray

Extras:

Warner Home SE / Blu-ray

 

DVD Box Covers

  

Distribution

Warner Home Video

Region 1  - NTSC

Warner Home Video SE
Region 1 - NTSC
Warner Home Video SE
Region FREE -
Blu-ray

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Gary Tooze