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S E A R C H    D V D B e a v e r

(aka "Andrej Rubljov" or "Strasti po Andreju" or "Andrei Rublev")

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/direct-chair/tarkovsky.htm
U.S.S.R. 1966

"I want to make a film about Andrei Rublov, the great 15th century Russian painter. I'm interested in the connections between creator's personality and his times. Thanks to the inborn subtlety a painter is able to comprehend the deepest meaning of the times he lives in and to present this meaning to the full. This will be neither a historical nor a biographical film. I'm fascinated by the process of artistic maturing of the painter and by the process of analyzing his talent. Andrei Rublov's work marks the apex of the Russian Renaissance. Rublov is one of the most outstanding figures in history of our culture. His life and art contain an unusual wealth of material."

 Andrei Tarkovsky    

Excerpt from The Tolstoy Complex, edited by Dr. Seweryn Kusmierczyk at the Polish Literature Department of Warsaw University found on Nostalghia.com.

Posters

Theatrical Premiere: February 1969 - U.S.S.R.

Reviews                                                                                     More Reviews                                                                                   DVD Reviews

 

Comparison:

MK2 (2-disc)- Region 0 - PAL vs. Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC vs. Lizard - Region 0- PAL vs. RusCiCo (2 disc) - Region 0 - NTSC vs. Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray vs. Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 Big thanks to Andrey Diment for the Lizard DVD Screen Caps!

1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - BOTTOM LEFT

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - BOTTOM RIGHT
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - TOP LEFT

6) Criterion - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - TOP RIGHT

 

    

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Criterion Collection Spine # 34

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Box Covers

 

 

Distribution

MK2 -

Region 0 - PAL

Criterion Collection - Spine # 34

Region 0  - NTSC

Lizard -

Region 0 - PAL

RusCiCo (Russian Cinema Council)
Region 0 - NTSC
Runtime 1:21:12 + 1:33:21 = 2:54:33 (4% PAL speedup) 3:25:41 1:21:09 + 1:33:27 = 2:54:36 (4% PAL speedup) 2:51:24 3:02:52.461

Andrei Rublev: 3:03:10.521

'The Passion of Andrei' Cut: 3:25:51.505

Video 2.02:1 aspect ratio 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 6.76 + 6.74, average = 6.75 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

2.35:1 aspect ratio
Average Bitrate: 4.51 mb/s
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

2.30:1 aspect ratio 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.25 + 6.36, average = 5.81 mb/s
PAL 720x576 25.00 f/s

2.02:1 aspect ratio 16X9 enhanced
Average Bitrate: 5.76 + 5.47, average = 5.62 mb/s
NTSC 704x480 29.97 f/s

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 45,965,552,284 bytes

Feature: 45,595,625,472 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.00

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

Andrei Rublev:

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,590,313,345 bytes

Feature: 33,648,592,896 bytes

Video Bitrate: 21.01 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

'The Passion of Andrei' Cut:

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,915,405,112 bytes

Feature: 48,462,821,376 bytes

Video Bitrate: 27.55 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Bitrate:  MK2

 

Bitrate:

Criterion

 

Bitrate:

Lizard

 

Bitrate:

RusCiCo

(Disc #1 + #2 )

  

Bitrate:

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

  

Bitrate:

Criterion 'Andrei Rublev'

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

  

Bitrate:

Criterion 'The Passion of Andrei cut"

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

  

Audio Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1), DUB: French (Dolby Digital 5.1)

Russian (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono)

Commentary: English (Dolby Digital 1.0 mono)

Russian DD 5.1, Russian mono

Russian (Dolby Digital 5.1), DUB: French (Dolby Digital 5.1)

LPCM Audio Russian 1536 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1536 kbps / 16-bit LPCM Audio Russian 1152 kbps 1.0 / 48 kHz / 1152 kbps / 24-bit (both)
Subtitles Russian, English, Deutsch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Hebrew, Mandarin, Japanese NOTE: they cannot be changed on the fly! A subtitle is mandatory unless you choose the French DUB! English and none Russian, none Russian, English, Deutsch, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Arabic, Hebrew, Mandarin, Japanese NOTE: they cannot be changed on the fly! A subtitle is mandatory unless you choose the French DUB! English and none

Andrei Rublev: English and none

'The Passion of Andrei' Cut: Burned-in English

 

 

Features Release Information:
Studio:
MK2

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.02:1

Edition Details:
Disc 1:

• Filmographies of Andrei Tarkovsky, Nicolai Sergeyev (actor), Vadim Yusov (cameraman), Irma Raush (Irina Tarkonskya - actress), Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov (composer), Rolan Bykov (actor), Nicolai Grinko (actor) text screen with imbedded announcements for future RusCiCo DVDs.
• Photos -10 images from production in a thumbnail single page listing (click to enlarge).

• Interview with A. Tarkovsky’s sister M. Tarkovskaya (2:00)

• Etude 1 (4:3): "Buffoon" (1:46)
• Etude 2 (4:3): “Theophanes the Greek” (6:57)
• Etude 3 (4:3): “The Andrei Passion” (2:46)
• Etude 4 (4:3): "Celebration" (2:37)
• Etude 5 (4:3): "Day of Judgment" ( black and white - destruction of Orthodox icons and architecture by the Soviets) (6:27)
• Teasers of Ruscico's future releases: Soljaris (3:19), Zerkalo (2:38), Stalker (3:30), Vojna i mir (4:09), Komissar (1:32)

Disc 2:
• Featurette: Making the film (5:20
• Etude 1
(4:3): “Raid” (8:41)
• Etude 2 (4:3): "Silence" - montage of frescoes (5:12)
• Etude 3 (4:3): "Bell" (3:36)
• Teasers of Ruscico's future releases: Siberiada (2:22), Svoj sredi čuzhich (2:33), Brillantovaja ruka (2:48)
• Pictures and filmography of the film’s authors;
• Photos -10 images from production in a thumbnail single page listing (click to enlarge).
• Interview with the actor Y. Nazarov (4:26)

*Not for sale or rent on all former territories of the USSR.

• Number of discs: 2

 

Release Information:
Studio:
Criterion

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen letterbox - 2.35:1

Edition Details:
• The definitive 205-minute director’s cut with exclusive widescreen digital transfer
• Completely retranslated subtitles that restore 40% of the dialogue
• Rare film interviews with Tarkovsky, with a general essay on Tarkovsky’s work by Professor Petric
• Audio essays by Harvard film professor Vlada Petric over select scenes
• A timeline featuring key events in Russian history, plus the lives and works of Andrei Rublev and Andrei Tarkovsky
• Widescreen letterbox format

 Audio Commentary by Vlada Petric, professor of film at Harvard University
• Rare film interviews with Andrei Tarkovsky (18:19)
• Timeline: Key events in Russian history, the lives and works of Andrei Rublev and Andrei Tarkovsky in clickable shifting text with images.
• Color Bars
• 6-Page Booklet with Liner Essay by J. Hoberman

DVD Release Date: February 2, 1999
Keep Case

Chapters 53

Release Information:
Distributor: Lizard
Released by: Krypny Plan


Edition Details:

Double DVD set

 

Disk 1 (7.70 Gb):

* Main feature (each part as a separate title, with seamless branching)

 

Disk 2 (3.91 Gb):

* Interview with Vadim Yusov (cinematographer) - 43:08, 6 chapters

* Interview with Saveli Yamschikov (consultant) - 36:20, 4 chapters

* Interview with Yuri Nazarov (actor) - 4:27

* Interview with Marina Tarkovskaya (A. Tarkovsky's sister) - 2:01

* Filmographies
* Photoalbum

• Number of discs: 2

 

DVD Release Date: June 9, 2004
Super Jewel Case

Chapters  14 (part I), 9 (part II)

 

Release Information:
Studio: Russian Film Council

Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen anamorphic - 2.02:1

Edition Details:
Disc 1:

• Filmographies of Andrei Tarkovsky, Nicolai Sergeyev (actor), Vadim Yusov (cameraman), Irma Raush (Irina Tarkonskya - actress), Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov (composer), Rolan Bykov (actor), Nicolai Grinko (actor) text screen with imbedded announcements for future RusCiCo DVDs.
• Photos -10 images from production in a thumbnail single page listing (click to enlarge).

• Interview with A. Tarkovsky’s sister M. Tarkovskaya (2:00)

• Etude 1 (4:3): "Buffoon" (1:46)
• Etude 2 (4:3): “Theophanes the Greek” (6:57)
• Etude 3 (4:3): “The Andrei Passion” (2:46)
• Etude 4 (4:3): "Celebration" (2:37)
• Etude 5 (4:3): "Day of Judgment" ( black and white - destruction of Orthodox icons and architecture by the Soviets) (6:27)
• Teasers of Ruscico's future releases: Soljaris (3:19), Zerkalo (2:38), Stalker (3:30), Vojna i mir (4:09), Komissar (1:32)

Disc 2:
• Featurette: Making the film (5:20
• Etude 1
(4:3): “Raid” (8:41)
• Etude 2 (4:3): "Silence" - montage of frescoes (5:12)
• Etude 3 (4:3): "Bell" (3:36)
• Teasers of Ruscico's future releases: Siberiada (2:22), Svoj sredi čuzhich (2:33), Brillantovaja ruka (2:48)
• Pictures and filmography of the film’s authors;
• Photos -10 images from production in a thumbnail single page listing (click to enlarge).
• Interview with the actor Y. Nazarov (4:26)

*Not for sale or rent on all former territories of the USSR.

• Number of discs: 2

DVD Release Date: January 21st, 2002
Slim Double
Keep Case

Chapters: 6 on 1st disc, 4 on 2nd = 10

Release Information:
Studio: Artificial Eye

Aspect Ratio:

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 45,965,552,284 bytes

Feature: 45,595,625,472 bytes

Video Bitrate: 30.00

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video


Edition Details:
• Mary Wild Introduction (2:35)

• Selected scene commentary with Film Psychoanalyst Mary Wild (13:48 - Part 2)

• Making of 'Andrei Rublev' (5:17)
•  Interview with Yuriy Nazarov (4:31)

•  Interview with Marina Tarkovsky (2:01)
• 36 page booklet

 

Blu-ray Release Date: July 11th, 2016
Standard Blu-ray case

Chapters 12

Release Information:
Studio: Criterion

Andrei Rublev:

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,590,313,345 bytes

Feature: 33,648,592,896 bytes

Video Bitrate: 21.01 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video

 

'The Passion of Andrei' Cut:

2.35:1 Original Aspect Ratio

1080P / 23.976 fps Dual-layered Blu-ray

Disc Size: 48,915,405,112 bytes

Feature: 48,462,821,376 bytes

Video Bitrate: 27.55 Mbps

Codec: MPEG-4 AVC Video


Edition Details:
• The Passion According to Andrei, the original 205-minute version of the film
Steamroller and Violin, Tarkovsky’s 1961 student thesis film (45:25)
• The Three Andreis, a 1966 documentary about the writing of the film’s script (18:49)
• On the Set of “Andrei Rublev,” a 1966 documentary about the making of the film (05:19)
• New doc f /interviews with actor Nikolai Burlyaev and cinematographer Vadim Yusov by filmmakers Seán Martin and Louise Milne (29:10)
• New interview with film scholar Robert Bird (36:59)
• Selected-scene commentary from 1998 featuring film scholar Vlada Petric (49:43)
• New video essay by filmmaker Daniel Raim (12:56)
• PLUS: An essay by critic J. Hoberman
New cover by Nessim Higsont

 

Blu-ray Release Date: September 25th, 2018
Transparent Blu-ray case

Chapters: 26 / 25

Alternate Version:

 

Artificial Eye (UK) - Region 0 - PAL

This version is the PAL version of the RusCiCo NTSC with a few more Extras. A comparison between the Artificial Eye and the Criterion releases can be found on ChiaroScuro located HERE.

 

Comments:

NOTE: The below Blu-ray captures were taken directly from the Blu-ray disc.

ADDITION: Criterion - Region 'A' Blu-ray - August 2018: Criterion present 2 cuts of Andrei Tarkovsky's epic masterpiece, "Andrei Rublev" on 2 Blu-rays. The first disc presents a new high-definition restoration of the director's preferred 183-minute cut. When compared to the Artificial Eye Blu-ray, this image seems framed slightly tighter on the top and bottom. There is more grain and slightly more detail in the Criterion transfer. Depth and contrast look slightly better here as well, with black levels appear deeper and more varied. Disc 2 houses "The Passion According to Andrei", the original 205-minute version of the film that was originally suppressed by Soviet authorities. This cut does not look as good as the 1st disc. Interestingly, this seems to be a different print than Criterion's previous non-anamorphic DVD. There are burned in subtitles and the light seems to blow out the image a bit, resulting in a loss of detail. There are multiple instances of scratches and debris. Contrast levels are nowhere near as impressive as they are on the 1st disc's cut. When there are moments of color at the end of the film, the colors are slightly different here than on the 1st disc (see cap of horses in the rain). Still, nice to have this included here, and it is a big step-up over Criterion's old DVD.

The first disc's audio features an uncompressed mono track. This is a 24-bit Linear PCM track in Russian. The second disc also has a 24-bit Linear PCM 1.0 Russian track but this is a different track altogether, certain dialogue is different and the sound is nowhere near as crisp as it is on the 1st disc. There are optional English subtitles (a new translation) on disc 1, and burned-in English subtitles on disc 2 (the longer "passion" cut). This is available in Region A -locked
Blu-ray.

"Inventing Andrei Rublev" is a 12-minute 2018 video essay where filmmaker Daniel Raim looks at Tarkovsky's creative process and the unique aesthetic philosophy he applied in creating Rublev, using the director's own words from interviews and essays. "Vlada Petric" is a 49-minute selected-scene commentary, with film scholar Vlada Petric analyzing the formal characteristics of Rublev (produced in 1998). "Robert Bird" is a new 37-minute interview with film scholar Robert Bird, author of the BFI monograph Andrei Rublev (2004). Here Bird discusses Tarkovsky's film and the complex relationship between it and the historical painter Rublev. "Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev: A Journey" is a new 30-minute documentary from filmmakers Louise Milne and Sean Martin. This doc features interviews with actor Nikolai Burlyaev, cinematographer Vadim Yusov, Tarkovsky personal assistant Olga Surkova, film critic Dmitri Salynsky, and Tarkovsky scholar Vida T. Johnson. "On The Set of Andrei Rublev" is a 5-minute collection of silent footage of Tarkovsky directing Andrei Rublev. This archival material is held by the Russian State Documentary Film & Photo Archive in Krasnogorsk. "The Three Andreis", a 19-minute short 1966 documentary about the making of Andrei Rublev is a project by Dina Musatova, who studied at the VGIK film school with Tarkovsky. This film is held by the Russian State Documentary & Photo Archive in Krasnogorsk. Criterion have also included Tarkovsky's first publicly released film of any kind, "The Steamroller and the Violin" from 1961. This 45-minute film was his thesis project from the VGIK film school in Moscow. The US rerelease trailer is also included here. as is an essay by critic J. Hoberman.

Andrei Rublev is Tarkovsky's masterpiece, and Criterion have created quite a complete package here with two versions and extensive supplements including the select-scene commentary. Criterion fans have waited patiently after It's non-anamorphic DVD of 19 years ago. It's unusual that the longer 205-minute cut has burned-in subtitles, but it is, at least, very satisfying to finally have it in 1080p. Cinema fans know the value of the film and having it in the HD resolution is somewhat of a revelation.

Colin Zavitz

***

ADDITION: Artificial Eye - Region 'B' Blu-ray - July 2016: As we already knew - this would be the shorter cut, but my viewing in 1080P was still a revelation. The higher resolution adds another dimension to the viewing experience. It carries a heavier, film-like feeling than any of the SDs. In-motion it looks very pleasing. I'm still analyzing the static images and some visual comparisons but my initial observations are very positive.

AE use a linear PCM 2.0 channel (16-bit) and Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov's score sounds rich and moving via the uncompressed. Quite marvelous and impacting. There are optional English subtitles on the region 'B' Blu-ray.

Extras include another educational 'Mary Wild introduction' to 'Andrei Tarkovsky's metaphysical dream zone' followed by the second part (1st is on AE's Blu-ray of Ivan's Childhood) of a visual essay (Part 2: Andrei Rublev's Metaphysical Structure) by the film psychoanalyst running almost 14-minutes. There is a 5-minute making of 'Andrei Rublev' and short interviews with Yuriy Nazarov and Marina Tarkovsky discussing the director. The package contains a 36 page, liner notes, booklet.

One of cinema's all-time greatest films - brought to adept Blu-ray with some solid supplements by AE. Fans will be very appreciative. Strongly recommended!

 

***

ADDITION: MK2 (France) - Region 0 - PAL -  May 2005 - Bottom line on this is the same as in the Mirror comparison - the MK2 is a direct port of the RusCiCo PAL, which is the same as the AE edition. Although it is anamorphic the image has a huge black border around it limiting horizontal resolution. The Lizard edition eclipses all other "shorter" versions of the film and the Criterion is still the definitive for the extended edition.

****

ADDITION (Lizard edition Aug 04)

The new Lizard edition has a very good image - perhaps the best I have seen. It is one DVD9 and one DVD5 and appears (from the screen captures) far superior to both the Criterion and RusCiCo. It again shows the cropping on the Criterion and that the CC edition has weak contrast. I was expecting to find Edge enhancement but it seems clean. It is sharper, brighter and the best contrast. Unfortunately this is the 'cut version' and is only in Russian with no English subtitles, but it is quite gratifying to know that another version could be available to us with such sterling quality. Colors are different, and may possibly be the most accurate. Its hard to know for sure, but they are more vibrant. If you are very familiar with the film, and want the "cut version" the Lizard print is the way to go... even if its just for the visuals. Let's hope this ignites a fire to get a strong print "cut version" for English language audiences soon.

From Andrey Diment:

I admit, "sharp" may not be the right word. Still, a problem does exist. Contrast edges (on the Lizard) look washed out a little, kind of Gibbs effect... A good example is the Idiot Girl capture - splashes and the girl's hair look more natural on the Criterion capture.

***

These two DVDs were made from different prints of Andrei Rublev. There are at least 4 version that I am aware of and the RusCiCo is a "cut version" where the Criterion is the "Director's Version" (also referred to as the 'Scorsese version' as it was with his efforts that it was snuck out of Russia). This makes a comparison all the more interesting. Both films are valid versions, both of great film historical value - both from Tarkovsky's hands. The jury is still out on what version Andrei actually preferred.

On the image quality, the Criterion displays a softer, warmer image, in comparison to the grittier harshly contrasted RusCiCo version. The Criterion is sharper. It also has more accurate colors hues in the limited sequences that have colour at the end of the film. Probably the biggest disparity between the two images is in the aspect ratio. The Criterion is cropped on various sides at different times. It is not consistent, but this is only in comparison to the RusCiCo which may also have some image placement manipulation. The RusCiCo has other issues though. It is slightly out of ratio with characters appearing slightly slimmer and taller. The RusCiCo image has some contrast boosting in spots and dampens its own detail because of this. This borders on visible edge enhancement. The Criterion is an easier winner in this category regardless of the fact that the RusCico is anamorphic and the Criterion is not. The Criterion Rublov looks as if the source element was overexposed by about 1 stop throughout - perhaps the Scorsese print is an 'answer print'.  It appears as if there is not enough shadow detail and it looks like perhaps Criterion tried to compensate for it by slightly boosting the luminance. Criterion has used a similar effect in many of their recent transfer of ilsm to DVD.

In the sound department, the RusCiCo have bumped the original mono track to a 5.1 Dolby Digital track. Although this sounds wonderful for Home Theatre aficionados, it is not accurate for the context of the director presentation of the film. The RusCiCo should have given the original mono as an option. The RusCiCo also has a French voice-over available  in place of the original Russian as an option.

Although the Criterion has a wonderful commentary track and rare Tarkovsky interview, the RusCiCo has a multitude of extensive Extras Features, many of which remain quite buried within the text screens of the filmographies. It is pretty hard to say one is better than the other in this category, but I would lean towards the Criterion, but suggest that true fans of the film may want both versions simply for the Extras. 

The Criterion menus are much cleaner and easier to navigate. Because the RusCiCo has a stipulation not to sell or rent this DVD on any former territories of the USSR, it has made set-up very cumbersome and confusing. The menu system seems designed simply to avoid any ability to watch this DVD without subtitles unless you have the French Voice-over on. Many of the extras features are displayed with a hard to distinguish, poorly colour -coded font.

Final comment: This is a majestic piece of film-making and it is impossible not to recommend the Director's Cut as the definitive viewing option. However the RusCiCo 'cut version' offers other insights into the censorship of the film and I was unable to determine conclusive reasons why certain scenes were omitted, but it was none-the-less fascinating. I look forward to Richard Malloy's eventual article/essay discussing these two versions in the near future.

 - Gary W. Tooze

 

 

ANDREI TARKOVSKY: "Nobody has ever cut anything from Andrei Rublov. Nobody except me. I made some cuts myself. In the first version the film was 3 hours 20 minutes long. In the second — 3 hours 15 minutes. I shortened the final version to 3 hours 6 minutes. I am convinced the latest version is the best, the most successful. And I only cut certain overly long scenes. The viewer doesn't even notice their absence. The cuts have in no way changed neither the subject matter nor what was for us important in the film. In other words, we removed overly long scenes which had no significance."

 

"We shortened certain scenes of brutality in order to induce psychological shock in viewers, as opposed to a mere unpleasant impression which would only destroy our intent. All my friends and colleagues who during long discussions were advising me to make those cuts turned out right in the end. It took me some time to understand it. At first I got the impression they were attempting to pressure my creative individuality. Later I understood that this final version of the film more than fulfils my requirements for it. And I do not regret at all that the film has been shortened to its present length".

Found on the ultimate Tarkovsky resource Nostalghia.com HERE


DVD Menus

(MK2- Region 0 - PAL LEFT vs. Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC RIGHT -  vs.

 

 

(Lizard - Region 0- PAL LEFT vs. RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - RIGHT)


 

Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray

 

 

Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Second Blu-ray

 

 

Criterion (BD 1) - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 

 

Criterion (BD 2) - Region 'A' - Blu-ray

 

 


 

CLICK EACH BLU-RAY CAPTURE TO SEE ALL IMAGES IN FULL 1920X1080 RESOLUTION

 

1) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC -TOP

2) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL SECOND

3) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - THIRD
4)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FOURTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

Screen Captures

 

Easy to see here how the RusCiCo has had its aspect ratio stretched.

 



 

Subtitle Sample

 

Criterion's bold font is represented below the frame on their non-anamorphic image where the RusCiCo and Lizard are both '16X9 friendly'. They use a slimmer, shorter font and in white outlined in black. It should be noted that the Criterion completely retranslated subtitles that restore 40% of the dialogue.

 

1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Potemkine (France) Blu-ray (no English subtitles)

 

Potemkine edition only has 'Andrei Rublev' version (3:02:38.333)

Disc Size: 48,737,143,133 bytes,

File Size:  32,123,996,160 bytes

Bitrate: 16.07 Mbps

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio Russian 3769 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3769 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio Russian 2073 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2073 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

Subtitles: French, none

 

 

part of Andreï Tarkovski - L'intégrale (version restaurée) Blu-ray

 


Screen Captures

 

1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

NOTE: The RusCiCo/Lizard DVD did not have a frame match for the below capture taken from the Criterion disc. The "dancing horse" sequence was a few seconds shorter in the print used by RusCiCo.

 

 


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: A significant amount of image has been cut off the top and bottom of the Criterion DVD.


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: Damage: Different scratches and marks are present on each of the two Criterion/Lizard transfers, where the Lizard looks clean. Aspect Ratio: The RusCiCo characters are stretched  slimmer and taller than the Criterion/Lizard.


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


 

1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

NOTE: "Ghosting" (blurred image) occurs occasionally on the RusCiCo print. This is often a result of poor PAL to NTSC transference.

NOTE: How superior the contrast is on he Lizard print!

 


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: A noticeable amount of contrast boosting is present on the RusCiCo DVD.


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: Cropping, especially on the top and right edge, are present on the Criterion version.


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: The Criterion image is sharper and more detailed than the RusCiCo which is bordering on edge enhancement. The Lizard image looks sharpest of all three, but possibly contrast boosted.


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: This was the exact first frame after a specific scene on all 3 DVDs. Never having seen a theatrical version I would guess that the RusCiCo colour is inaccurate as it appears washed-out, but it is hard to know positively. The Lizard looks to have more texture.

I was quite puzzled by the color differences as seen in the horse, and discussed this with Gary. I just looked up that particular icon in this book of mine (the book Alexander got as a birthday present in SACRIFICE - see BELOW), and it appears on page 74, "Entry into Jerusalem". This is a fairly high-quality book from a print quality point of view, so I do tend to trust it. The DVDBeaver comparison shows three frames: the top frame (Criterion) matches the printed image best, as far as color is concerned. The yellow should perhaps be slightly more saturated (a luminous gold) if I were to be picky. The Lizard (middle) release doesn't show a yellow/gold at all -- it is very wrong indeed. The woman's dress in Criterion should perhaps be a slightly more saturated as well (in conclusion: the Criterion could do with some added vibrancy), and in this case Lizard does do a better job (which only goes to show that the color BALANCING on the Lizard is problematic: how can one color be almost correct, and another way off? At least Criterion exhibit a certain consistency). On my Apple flat panel monitor, the Lizard frame on the DVDBeaver website shows a metallic blue on the horse's leg. This is most definitely not correct, according to the Icon book. The subtly shaded grey of the Criterion is much closer to the truth. (Needless to say, the RusCiCo frame shown at the bottom is way off, in every respect).

Trond Trondsen of Nostalghia.com

 

 

 


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 


1) MK2 - Region 0 - PAL - TOP

2) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC SECOND

3) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL THIRD

4) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - FOURTH
5)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - SIXTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

NOTE: The final scene, in color on the print used by Criterion/Lizard, is in black and white on the RusCiCo DVD.

1) Criterion - Region 0 - NTSC -TOP

2) Lizard - Region 0 - PAL SECOND

3) RusCiCo - Region 0 - NTSC - THIRD
4)
Artificial Eye - Region 'B' - Blu-ray - FOUTH

6) Criterion "AR" - Region 'A' - Blu-ray - FIFTH

7) Criterion "Passion" - Region 'A'  - Blu-ray - BOTTOM

 

 

Unmatchable frames: I found this most interesting. I wondered why I could not match this frame until I looked at both scenes one after the other. The short shot of the milky liquid leaking from the flask skin (at 1:29:38 on the Criterion print) appears to have been two separate shots for these two prints. The Criterion appears to have been photographed first and the one used in the RusCiCo/Lizard print looks to have been shot immediately after. The disbursement of the liquid was advanced almost exactly from the point concluding the Criterion scene to start the RusCiCo/Lizard one.

 

 

Potemkine (France) Blu-ray (no English subtitles)

 

Potemkine edition only has 'Andrei Rublev' version (3:02:38.333)

Disc Size: 48,737,143,133 bytes,

File Size:  32,123,996,160 bytes

Bitrate: 16.07 Mbps

Audio:

DTS-HD Master Audio Russian 3769 kbps 5.1 / 48 kHz / 3769 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 5.1 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)
DTS-HD Master Audio Russian 2073 kbps 2.0 / 48 kHz / 2073 kbps / 24-bit (DTS Core: 2.0 / 48 kHz / 1509 kbps / 24-bit)

Subtitles: French, none

 

 

part of Andreï Tarkovski - L'intégrale (version restaurée) Blu-ray

 

 

Below is another example of a frame (scene NOT included in the RusCiCo/Lizard "cut" print):

The "cut version" appears to be missing approximately 30 minutes from their print. This was one of many examples of scenes that were not included in the version they used to produce the RusCiCo and Lizard DVDs.

 

Question to Tarkovsky: What was the reason for the differences between the screenplay for Rublov and the shooting script?

Answer: There were various reasons. In the first place the original version was not particularly good, in the second place it was too long, even in the Director's Version, and therefore it had to be adapted while work was going on. For instance the scene of the swan hunt, which was the first one I cut, was pretentious, it was too "ancient Russian," it had nothing to do with the central idea.


Hit Counter


    

Artificial Eye (UK)

Region 'B' - Blu-ray

Criterion Collection Spine # 34

Region 'A' - Blu-ray

Box Covers

 

 

Distribution

MK2 -

Region 0 - PAL

Criterion Collection - Spine # 34

Region 0  - NTSC

Lizard -

Region 0 - PAL

RusCiCo (Russian Cinema Council)
Region 0 - NTSC




 

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