(aka "7 Grand Masters" or "7 Grandmasters")

directed by Joseph Kuo
Taiwan 1978

 

An aging Kung Fu master sets out on a journey to test his incredible fighting skills against other masters for one last time before retiring from the fight forever. Along the way, a young rascal persuades the old master to accept him as his final student. The young man excels, and quickly becomes proficient in Kung Fu. He then delivers a shocking challenge that reveals a dark, deadly secret. The final showdown between the masters threatens to shake they very pillars of heaven!

This is a fun, simple film typical of the genre. It is packed with action sequences and easy to watch one dimensional characters. A great initiation for anyone keen on Kung Fu films.    out of    

Theatrical Release: 1978

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DVD Review: Media Blasters-  Region 0 - NTSC

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Distribution Media Blasters. - Region 0 - NTSC
Runtime 1:29:36 
Video 2.25:1 Original Aspect Ratio
Average Bitrate: 8.11 mb/s
NTSC 720x480 29.97 f/s
Bitrate:

NOTE: The Vertical axis represents the bits transferred per second. The Horizontal is the time in minutes.

Audio Mandarin (Dolby Digital 2.0 Dolby) , DUB: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Dolby) 
Subtitles English, Spanish, None
Features

Release Information:
Studio: Media Blasters

Aspect Ratio:
Original aspect Ratio 2.25:1

Edition Details:

• Liner notes from Linn Hayes

Original trailer (4:56 , widescreen 4:3)
• Six additional 4:3 widescreen trailers (Zatoichi, Sure Death, Samurai Fiction, Red Shadow, New Big Boss, Kunoichi)

DVD Release Date: March 30th, 2004

Keep Case
Chapters: 18

Comments:

On first viewing I was a little harsh on reviewing this title on DVD. I re-watched it a 2nd time and am able to clear up some of my previous points (with thanks to Linn Haynes). It is confirmed that the transfer was from a PAL source hence the "Ghosting" in the many of the images with movement (see first capture below). Although this becomes most apparent when doing screen captures for the review, it is far less noticeable on normal viewing.

I originally stated that it was ported from a Mei Ah laserdisc - as I saw their logo open the film and this practice is quite common in many Asian DVDs. I was incorrect - Mei Ah, who owns the rights to the film, just got the rights a year ago to all of Joseph Kuo's films and licensed it to Media Blasters. This release was made from an original film negative in Mei Ah and remastered by them. The only releases of this film prior to this one was three full screen releases (one subbed and two dubbed) and a semi-widescreen release from German that was slightly cut.

The colors still seem a little washed out to me with a greenish tinge, but I understand this was the original appearance of the film. I again saw very minor damage (dust, speckles etc.) which did not detract from the viewing experience. It is anamorphic with decent contrast and unusually sharp for a release of this genre and being this old. The subtitles are clean, bright and I didn't notice any errors at all even on 2nd viewing where I was scrutinizing. The subs are different than the English DUB and my Chinese speaking wife verified their accuracy with the audio.  The Extras are not extensive with some trailers which are in very poor condition and Linn Haynes informative liner notes.  out of  

Gary W. Tooze



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Subtitle Sample

 

 


 

Screen Captures

 

Ghosting sample

 

 


 

 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

 

 


 

 


 

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